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  • #16
    Originally posted by LindaRacine View Post
    Those are the standard long cassette xrays, one view taken from either the front or the back, and one from the side. When flatback is an issue, they need to be able to see what the spine looks like under load (that is, not when lying down).
    Oh. Not sure if the x-rays I had are that. I do know I was standing though! I'll ask about that too, next time.

    And while I'm here, I tried to indicate that I wanted to be notified if there were any comments on this thread, and thought I checked the right boxes, but I am not getting email alerts. Am I missing the secret?
    Singing the Blues
    Female 1951
    A/P Surgery Oct 13th & 17th '05, from T7-L5, 46 degree curve reduced to 19 degrees. Rib hump almost gone, but I have flatback. Thought it was "normal" and I would improve over time. I developed kyphosis above the surgical area. Had surgery with Dr Menmuir in Reno, Nv on October 13, 2010.
    Today I am still plagued with flatback, and I'm considering ALIF surgery.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Sharon C View Post

      And while I'm here, I tried to indicate that I wanted to be notified if there were any comments on this thread, and thought I checked the right boxes, but I am not getting email alerts. Am I missing the secret?
      I think it's turned off for the entire group, but I'll ask Joe O'Brien when I next talk to him.

      --Linda
      Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Twain
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
      Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation

      Comment


      • #18
        I sometimes get notifications but they come days later.
        Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

        No island of sanity.

        Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
        Answer: Medicine


        "We are all African."

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Pooka1 View Post
          I sometimes get notifications but they come days later.
          I finally got notified today, then clicked on what I thought was a link to take me there and clicked on unsubscribing to the thread instead. GOOD GRIEF!
          I'll try to re-subscribe now....
          Singing the Blues
          Female 1951
          A/P Surgery Oct 13th & 17th '05, from T7-L5, 46 degree curve reduced to 19 degrees. Rib hump almost gone, but I have flatback. Thought it was "normal" and I would improve over time. I developed kyphosis above the surgical area. Had surgery with Dr Menmuir in Reno, Nv on October 13, 2010.
          Today I am still plagued with flatback, and I'm considering ALIF surgery.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Sharon C View Post
            I finally got notified today, then clicked on what I thought was a link to take me there and clicked on unsubscribing to the thread instead. GOOD GRIEF!
            I'll try to re-subscribe now....
            I've found that the most convenient way to see what's new, is to click on "New Posts" in the upper left-hand corner. I get a list of only what's occurred since I last read the Forum.
            Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Twain
            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
            Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by LindaRacine View Post
              Hi Sharon...

              I did have an ALIF, but it was part of a combined anterior/posterior procedure.

              A standalone ALIF is not something I've heard of being done, but that doesn't mean it's not an option. It seems to me that there might be an issue because the back of your spine is almost certainly fused solidly at this point. Does a wedged cage have enough strength to stand up to a solid posterior fusion? I would do two things if I were you. First, I would ask what your surgeons think about the risk of requiring additional posterior surgery in the future. Second, I would try to get a second opinion from someone outside the current practice (UCSF would be the obvious choice).

              --Linda
              Sooo Linda,

              I'm also thinking about whether the fusion to the pelvis with nuts and bolts has bothered you (pain or otherwise) /made you much less able to accomplish what you might have been able to beforehand, etc. I believe Ed illustrated that he can no longer touch the ground. This is my new panicky thought when waking in the night--being so small boned that I will feel/be plagued by the hardware and fusion. Just so afraid of being worse off and regretting it all. Then I have to remind myself I don't need to do anything if I don't choose to! And that is the only way I will take this step is if I can be significantly improved, and actually accomplish being able to walk without a walker/cane/cart.
              What was your reason for having it done...disc degeneration or..? I'm thinking you're a pretty smart cookie, so it must have been too much pain that drove you to it.

              Thanks for the "new post tip" while I'm at it. :-)
              Singing the Blues
              Female 1951
              A/P Surgery Oct 13th & 17th '05, from T7-L5, 46 degree curve reduced to 19 degrees. Rib hump almost gone, but I have flatback. Thought it was "normal" and I would improve over time. I developed kyphosis above the surgical area. Had surgery with Dr Menmuir in Reno, Nv on October 13, 2010.
              Today I am still plagued with flatback, and I'm considering ALIF surgery.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Sharon C View Post
                Sooo Linda,

                I'm also thinking about whether the fusion to the pelvis with nuts and bolts has bothered you (pain or otherwise) /made you much less able to accomplish what you might have been able to beforehand, etc. I believe Ed illustrated that he can no longer touch the ground. This is my new panicky thought when waking in the night--being so small boned that I will feel/be plagued by the hardware and fusion. Just so afraid of being worse off and regretting it all. Then I have to remind myself I don't need to do anything if I don't choose to! And that is the only way I will take this step is if I can be significantly improved, and actually accomplish being able to walk without a walker/cane/cart.
                What was your reason for having it done...disc degeneration or..? I'm thinking you're a pretty smart cookie, so it must have been too much pain that drove you to it.

                Thanks for the "new post tip" while I'm at it. :-)
                Hi Sharon...

                I've gotten accustomed to the implants and don't really feel them. Unfortunately, I really hate the lack of flexibility. It's very difficult for me to get up from the floor/ground. I can do it, but it looks really awkward, and I need a stool, chair, or something similar to brace myself. I avoid getting down on the floor like the plague. I can't put socks on my feet without a device. (I wear compression socks, which adds to the difficulty.) I have to use a different device to get my socks off. I had a couple of medical complications that left me with a pulmonary issue that requires that I'm on supplemental oxygen 24/7. I also ended up with lymphedema in my legs (thus, the compression socks), and some fairly uncomfortable numbness and tingling in my feet.

                So, with that said, the good news is that I no longer have back pain, or sciatic pain in my legs. While I felt I could live with my back pack prior to my surgeries, the sciatic pain made it next to impossible to stand/walk for more than 10-15 seconds. In my case, I could relieve my pain by sitting or lying down. For me, I feel like I traded one set of functional difficulties for others. I've often heard people say that they had surgery because they thought or were told they'd end up in a wheelchair. I'm not sure that that's the worst thing that could happen to me. With all that said, I'd probably do it again. IF I had a lot of pain while sitting or lying down, I'd have the surgery in a heartbeat.
                Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Twain
                ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
                Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation

                Comment


                • #23
                  The implants can be sized to your bone size. My surgeon used cervical screws in the thoracic to keep them smaller. You do get used to the implants. It is more how the implants restrict the ways you can move.
                  T10-pelvis fusion 12/08
                  C5,6,7 fusion 9/10
                  T2--T10 fusion 2/11
                  C 4-5 fusion 11/14
                  Right scapulectomy 6/15
                  Right pectoralis major muscle transfer to scapula
                  To replace the action of Serratus Anterior muscle 3/16
                  Broken neck 9/28/2018
                  Emergency surgery posterior fusion C4- T3
                  Repeated 11/2018 because rods pulled apart added T2 fusion
                  Removal of partial right thoracic hardware 1/2020
                  Removal and replacement of C4-T10 hardware with C7 and T 1
                  Osteotomy

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jackieg412 View Post
                    The implants can be sized to your bone size. My surgeon used cervical screws in the thoracic to keep them smaller. You do get used to the implants. It is more how the implants restrict the ways you can move.
                    Unfortunately, even with smaller, lower profile implants, some people are really bothered by the feeling. I think it's often because of muscle movement.
                    Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Twain
                    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
                    Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Wow...

                      Originally posted by LindaRacine View Post
                      Hi Sharon...

                      I've gotten accustomed to the implants and don't really feel them. Unfortunately, I really hate the lack of flexibility. It's very difficult for me to get up from the floor/ground. I can do it, but it looks really awkward, and I need a stool, chair, or something similar to brace myself. I avoid getting down on the floor like the plague. I can't put socks on my feet without a device. (I wear compression socks, which adds to the difficulty.) I have to use a different device to get my socks off. I had a couple of medical complications that left me with a pulmonary issue that requires that I'm on supplemental oxygen 24/7. I also ended up with lymphedema in my legs (thus, the compression socks), and some fairly uncomfortable numbness and tingling in my feet.

                      So, with that said, the good news is that I no longer have back pain, or sciatic pain in my legs. While I felt I could live with my back pack prior to my surgeries, the sciatic pain made it next to impossible to stand/walk for more than 10-15 seconds. In my case, I could relieve my pain by sitting or lying down. For me, I feel like I traded one set of functional difficulties for others. I've often heard people say that they had surgery because they thought or were told they'd end up in a wheelchair. I'm not sure that that's the worst thing that could happen to me. With all that said, I'd probably do it again. IF I had a lot of pain while sitting or lying down, I'd have the surgery in a heartbeat.

                      Sciatica is what brought me to get the original big, badass surgery done. Started getting it at my job that required a lot of bending, squatting, lifting etc. You know the lightening bolt shooting down the leg feeling well. I got the surgery against the advise of my then son-in-law, an anesthesiologist, who was dead-set against it (you'll never be the same!) and said I should at least seek another opinion from an orthopedic surgeon colleague. I did, and he didn't see how I could be pain-free without surgical intervention. Have to remind myself of that when I wish I would have never got it done. Living on pain meds wasn't how I wanted to live, but.......no use in playing the "if only I ....." game.

                      I am so sorry for you issues. As if just getting older isn't enough! You are wonderful to care about and help others in spite of it all, and I appreciate you more than you know. Another thing to be thankful for on this day :-) I too, can sit/lie down without much discomfort when I use the proper seat cushions, knee lift, and the adjustable Tempur-pedic bed I bought with my first disability check all those years ago. That is no small thing for folks like us, from what I've read here.

                      I think I am deciding to leave things alone--for now. Too many variables that just don't make sense in my current situation. I'll have the final visit on Dec 1st with doctor Mendoza, ask all my questions and record all the answers. I think I'll start trying to walk around the block with my cane, weather permitting. I have developed osteopenia, and doc wants me to do more weight bearing stuff. My occasional, beloved bike rides don't help with that much. My insurance does cover a gym membership, and I have gone pre-Covid, but the treadmill was always tough for me due to the flatback, so I used the sit down bike thingy for a warm-up, which again doesn't provide enough weight-bearing. I'll try the treadmill/stepper thingy again when the infection rates go down a bit.

                      Again, thanks so much for all your wisdom and insight!

                      Gratefully,
                      Sharon
                      Singing the Blues
                      Female 1951
                      A/P Surgery Oct 13th & 17th '05, from T7-L5, 46 degree curve reduced to 19 degrees. Rib hump almost gone, but I have flatback. Thought it was "normal" and I would improve over time. I developed kyphosis above the surgical area. Had surgery with Dr Menmuir in Reno, Nv on October 13, 2010.
                      Today I am still plagued with flatback, and I'm considering ALIF surgery.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        SRS Logo The Genie Lamp Dr Levine

                        Recently I was watching a scoliosis surgeon on a video and the old SRS logo was displayed behind him.....

                        On the lower left side of the logo is a scoliotic spine wrapping around a straight staff. On the lower right side, is a crooked tree supported by a tree stake.

                        Up at the top of the logo is a Genie lamp..... What does this signify? Is Barbara Eden (I dream of Jeannie) going to pop out? (smiley face)

                        Significance of the Genie in the lamp
                        https://www.giantglacier.com/genie-lamp-significance/

                        It was Dr David B Levine who suggested they work on scoliosis in the early 1960's and Dr Moe was in agreement. This was the very beginning of the Scoliosis Research Society....They probably designed the Logo and I would love to hear Dr Levine's take on selecting the Genie lamp in the original logo.......If he is reading....

                        Dr Levine ran the scoliosis dept at HSS (Hospital For Special Surgery) for a really long time...He is probably the most senior scoliosis surgeon in the US today.

                        See attachment below for the old SRS logo

                        The things we do for sciatica......

                        Thank you Linda for moderating the forum....also wanted to wish you an early happy birthday!

                        Ed
                        Attached Files
                        Last edited by titaniumed; 11-27-2021, 04:42 PM.
                        49 yr old male, now 63, the new 64...
                        Pre surgery curves T70,L70
                        ALIF/PSA T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
                        Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

                        Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
                        http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

                        My x-rays
                        http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

                        http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          You're A Gem..Too

                          Originally posted by titaniumed View Post
                          Recently I was watching a scoliosis surgeon on a video and the old SRS logo was displayed behind him.....

                          On the lower left side of the logo is a scoliotic spine wrapping around a straight staff. On the lower right side, is a crooked tree supported by a tree stake.

                          Up at the top of the logo is a Genie lamp..... What does this signify? Is Barbara Eden (I dream of Jeannie) going to pop out? (smiley face)

                          Significance of the Genie in the lamp
                          https://www.giantglacier.com/genie-lamp-significance/

                          It was Dr David B Levine who suggested they work on scoliosis in the early 1960's and Dr Moe was in agreement. This was the very beginning of the Scoliosis Research Society....They probably designed the Logo and I would love to hear Dr Levine's take on selecting the Genie lamp in the original logo.......If he is reading....

                          Dr Levine ran the scoliosis dept at HSS (Hospital For Special Surgery) for a really long time...He is probably the most senior scoliosis surgeon in the US today.

                          See attachment below for the old SRS logo

                          The things we do for sciatica......

                          Thank you Linda for moderating the forum....also wanted to wish you an early happy birthday!

                          Ed
                          And thanks to you too Ed, for all your research and support--especially for the Dr Menmuir rec those many moons ago. The personal visit was so very thoughtful--and helpful to hear from one who'd actually been there. Don't just run into scoli people every day, that's for sure.

                          I cancelled my Appt with Dr. Mendoza. Just couldn't wrap my head around it. Maybe someday. Don't know him well, but I did see him on an "emergency" basis as Dr Fry was booked for a couple of months last year, and I had had shooting pain down my arm for several days. Turns out my cervical area is degenerative too, but the pain had stopped by the time I saw him, after using ice and ibuprofen for those days it was worse. I decided the "watchful waiting" route would be my plan. Seems to be my M.O., and not such a bad one either!

                          I just wasn't impressed with his manner--didn't even take me to see the x-rays (should have asked, I know) and left a bit confused as I tend to be with a scary doctor's visit. I really loved that about Dr Menmuir. Never seemed rushed, and always had the films on display to point out this or that. And man, was he handsome! (ahem).

                          Sooo...I'll wait until the future brings a magical laying of hands (or the rubbing of a lamp;-) that cures all that ails us, and makes us whole again, (snicker snicker).

                          Happy holidays to you, and happy birthday Linda!
                          Singing the Blues
                          Female 1951
                          A/P Surgery Oct 13th & 17th '05, from T7-L5, 46 degree curve reduced to 19 degrees. Rib hump almost gone, but I have flatback. Thought it was "normal" and I would improve over time. I developed kyphosis above the surgical area. Had surgery with Dr Menmuir in Reno, Nv on October 13, 2010.
                          Today I am still plagued with flatback, and I'm considering ALIF surgery.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Thanks, I also thought you looked pretty good.....at least you don't have any screaming pain.

                            I was up at 9 levels of pain at various stages before my surgeries which is "one below screaming". That would be a good title for a scoliosis book.

                            I also cancelled in 2005 with Dr Menmuir, mainly because I wasn't ready. It was me, not him.

                            Your doctors should understand as these decisions are NOT easy.

                            Ed
                            49 yr old male, now 63, the new 64...
                            Pre surgery curves T70,L70
                            ALIF/PSA T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
                            Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

                            Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
                            http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

                            My x-rays
                            http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

                            http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by titaniumed View Post
                              Thanks, I also thought you looked pretty good.....at least you don't have any screaming pain.

                              I was up at 9 levels of pain at various stages before my surgeries which is "one below screaming". That would be a good title for a scoliosis book.

                              I also cancelled in 2005 with Dr Menmuir, mainly because I wasn't ready. It was me, not him.

                              Your doctors should understand as these decisions are NOT easy.

                              Ed
                              One Below Screaming--the book. Too funny (only hurts when we laugh).

                              Yeah, "looking pretty good" can be a curse. People think I "should" be able to walk/stand normally/comfortably. And I can still dance, which really makes 'em think it's all an act. I can do many things for a little while. Just need lots of breaks and sit downs.

                              I am always grateful I don't usually have lots of pain. Can't imagine trying to tolerate that.

                              Sharon
                              Singing the Blues
                              Female 1951
                              A/P Surgery Oct 13th & 17th '05, from T7-L5, 46 degree curve reduced to 19 degrees. Rib hump almost gone, but I have flatback. Thought it was "normal" and I would improve over time. I developed kyphosis above the surgical area. Had surgery with Dr Menmuir in Reno, Nv on October 13, 2010.
                              Today I am still plagued with flatback, and I'm considering ALIF surgery.

                              Comment

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