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Thread: 19 Year Old Male. Scoliosis Progressing.

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by debbei View Post
    Being physically fit will allow you the best possible recovery. Maybe you should ask your surgeon what exercises he recommends that you avoid. Don't think that you will never be able to exercise again because you will.

    As far as reaching your feet, you might be surprised. Depending on how low you are fused you might not have a problem. I am fused T3 to L3 and as of a few weeks post op, I was putting on my socks and shoes by myself. Like I said to someone else recently, everyone's recovery is different, so you have to wait to see how things are for you.

    Good luck,
    Thanks a lot. Yeah, I can't wait to get back into lifting after my surgery knowing there is nothing stopping me. And the pain will be gone, I was in so much pain at the gym without doing much work.

    Quote Originally Posted by lapieper View Post
    I'm 5'3", and didn't gain any height. Only weight... Probably due to sedentary lifestyle! But I'm back to exercising, walking, free weights. I even did a 5K yesterday! So life goes on. And, hey, I love my scar! And it goes a long way. From the base of my neck down to my, uh, well, all the way down! I've had three surgeries in the last year, hence, my sedentary ways. I kept waiting for it to heal. But this past month, I bowled, went to two Silver Stars Women's basketball games, and toured all over San Anotnio (even in the rain). Life is good. The surgery isn't easy, but it's worth every single pain, ache, and muscle spasm. I can put my shoes and socks on now, but it did take several months before I was able to accomplish that. Still taking it one day at a time!
    Wow, that is inspiring. I'm glad you can do everything you want after the surgery, I hope that is the same case with me.

    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    Hi JDM...

    I think you need to ask Dr. Cheng to give you the names and contact info for a few patients similar to yourself, who have already gone through surgery. You've made some incorrect assumptions, and these people will be able to give you a proper idea of what they went through.

    Unfortunately, people with lumbar curves are usually not candidates for the minimally invasive surgery you mentioned. But, if you're interested in pursuing that, you might want to see Dr. George Picetti at Sutter in Sacramento. He's known for that type of surgery.

    Regards,
    Linda
    I'll try, it is just very hard to reach this doctor and he's at Stanford, so he thinks he's like godlike. He saw my father and I for like 5-10 minutes and barely answered questions and then left. I know he's busy, but I'm going to need freakin spine surgery. He said I need an MRI, so I guess i'll have to wait. Plus Sac is near by, only 2 hours.


    Are there are risks of doing the little incisions on my side Picetti's way or is it recommended to just do the regular Posterior way through the back. My skin is light tanned, so I think the scar wouldn't stand out real bad and it would heal after time.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDM555 View Post
    Are there are risks of doing the little incisions on my side Picetti's way or is it recommended to just do the regular Posterior way through the back. My skin is light tanned, so I think the scar wouldn't stand out real bad and it would heal after time.
    Hi...

    There aren't really any additional risks according to published studies.

    Spine 2007 Nov 15;32(24):2777-85

    The use of thoracoscopy in the management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.
    Norton RP, Patel D, Kurd MF, Picetti GD, Vaccaro AR.

    Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case cohort series. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the outcomes of thoracoscopy in the surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Traditionally, progressive idiopathic scoliosis has been treated surgically with either an open posterior, anterior, or combined surgical approach. Surgical methods are being explored to minimize the extent of soft tissue disruption such as thoracoscopy followed spinal release, bone grafting, and instrumentation. Several authors have reported good results using thoracoscopy in the treatment of spinal deformity following a requisite learning curve. METHODS: A consecutive case cohort series of 45 adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis evaluated and treated at a single institution. Patients with a progressive deformity underwent a thoracoscopically assisted curve correction, fusion, and instrumentation procedure. After surgery, patients were assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. RESULTS: All patients underwent successful thoracoscopic instrumentation and fusion without the need for an open conversion. The average preoperative thoracolumbar Cobb measurement of the major curve was 51.6 degrees . The thoracolumbar levels instrumented anteriorly ranged from T7 to L3 and had an average postoperative Cobb angle of 6.58 degrees , with an overall improvement of 87.3%. To date, at a mean follow up of 4.6 years, all curves have maintained correction. Sagittal balance was recreated or maintained through the application of interbody femoral ring allografts. Operative times averaged 5 hours and 46 minutes, with a range of 3 hours, 48 minutes to 6 hours, 55 minutes. Hospital stays averaged 2.9 days, with a range of 2 to 7 days. All patients were completely off pain medication before their first postoperative visit at 4 weeks. Children were back to school between 2 and 4 weeks on average. There were a total of 3 complications. One patient experienced transient chest wall numbness, which resolved by 3 months. Two patients developed postoperative mucus plugging in the ventilated lung. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic thoracoscopic spinal deformity correction, fusion, and instrumentation is a safe and feasible method of surgical management of an adolescent patient with progressive scoliosis. The key to successful fusion is a total discectomy and complete endplate removal. This method appears to be comparable to open procedures in terms of curve correction with significantly shorter hospitalization and rehabilitation due to less surgical discomfort. The thoracoscopic correction of adolescent scoliosis warrants continued development and evaluation as a surgical method of scoliosis correction.

  3. #18
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    May i just ask a question...?

    when i saw dr boachie in nyc, he said he would do side incision for me...when i discussed this with another surgeon, he said he would do front & back incisions for me, as side incision might lead to lung issues...now, i am older, so maybe for young people, side incisions are a safer procedure...??

    just asking...

    jess

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrnyc View Post
    May i just ask a question...?

    when i saw dr boachie in nyc, he said he would do side incision for me...when i discussed this with another surgeon, he said he would do front & back incisions for me, as side incision might lead to lung issues...now, i am older, so maybe for young people, side incisions are a safer procedure...??

    just asking...

    jess

    Hmm, yeah that is one of the risks I read about. They have to deflate your lungs or something like that and take out a rib to reach your spine from the side, that might lead to lung issues as you said. I mean, I'd rather have side obviously, but if it might lead to more problems, I guess i'll just get posterior, I mean it's better than having posterior scars AND anterior scars on me. But the little 1-2" scars on the side under my arm/lat area is awesome imo.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrnyc View Post
    May i just ask a question...?

    when i saw dr boachie in nyc, he said he would do side incision for me...when i discussed this with another surgeon, he said he would do front & back incisions for me, as side incision might lead to lung issues...now, i am older, so maybe for young people, side incisions are a safer procedure...??

    just asking...

    jess
    Jess...

    I think that most of the best surgeons are no longer doing big side incisions to get to the front of the spine, so I'd be surprised if that's what Dr. Boachie actually meant (unless he said it some time ago). In most cases, if anterior release and/or circumfrential fusion are required, they're done thorascopically or through small midline incisions in the abdomen.

    Regards,
    Linda

  6. #21
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    JDM555:

    My now 14 yo son was fused T2-L4 10+ months ago. He was tying his shoes in less than 4 weeks and back in school in a month. He is just over 6 feet tall and under 125 lb (your build sounds like his), and VERY thin. Two months ago he was carrying a 25+ lb pack on some long days over pretty dicey trails with his dad and me and he did very well. He was able to start jogging again and got the okay to lift light weights (up to 50 lbs) at six months post-op. He did lose weight because of surgery, but he gained it back by 8 weeks post.

    He has a long scar down the back, and it's very thin. He also has very long legs, could not touch his toes before surgery, and can't now--but he is working on stretching his hamstrings. Football and will always be out, but just about any other non-contact sport is allowed (no parachuting, jumping on horseback, or motorcycling). Since you are in good condition and motivated, I think you'll be surprised at how quickly you heal and get back in shape.

    Mary Ellen

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by WNCmom View Post
    JDM555:

    My now 14 yo son was fused T2-L4 10+ months ago. He was tying his shoes in less than 4 weeks and back in school in a month. He is just over 6 feet tall and under 125 lb (your build sounds like his), and VERY thin. Two months ago he was carrying a 25+ lb pack on some long days over pretty dicey trails with his dad and me and he did very well. He was able to start jogging again and got the okay to lift light weights (up to 50 lbs) at six months post-op. He did lose weight because of surgery, but he gained it back by 8 weeks post.

    He has a long scar down the back, and it's very thin. He also has very long legs, could not touch his toes before surgery, and can't now--but he is working on stretching his hamstrings. Football and will always be out, but just about any other non-contact sport is allowed (no parachuting, jumping on horseback, or motorcycling). Since you are in good condition and motivated, I think you'll be surprised at how quickly you heal and get back in shape.

    Mary Ellen
    Yeh, that sounds like me. 6+ft plus and 125lbs. I have a very thin bone structure and build overall. So gaining 60 lbs is something that I had to work a lot harder for than someone who can easily gain muscle. I hope I can get back to stuff like boating/jetskiing/basketball/weight lifting/cardio/etc. I don't need motorcycling, horseback, parachuting. 50 lb limit at 6 months, but what about after? At the 1 year, can he do whatever he wants, or is there still a limit.

  8. #23
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    Hi JDM, I don't have much to add to all of the very good words of encouragement except that I am in awe of how much knowledge you seem to have gained from research. This will help you as you go though this surgery and recovery in that there shouldn't be too many surprises! As far as the weight issue, you will have to be diligent in your diet, making sure it is healthy with lots of protein. My physical therapist also advised me that to put weight on to do a lot of resistance vs. aerobic exercises. Good luck to you in choosing a surgeon.
    Dolores A
    June 4, 2009 Anterior L3 - S1
    June 8, 2009 Posterior T4 - Pelvis
    Mark Agulnick, MD FAAOS
    NY Spine & Scoliosis Center

  9. #24
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    hope I can get back to stuff like boating/jetskiing/basketball/weight lifting/cardio/etc. I don't need motorcycling, horseback, parachuting. 50 lb limit at 6 months, but what about after? At the 1 year, can he do whatever he wants, or is there still a limit.
    JDM555:

    Every case is different and every surgeon has slightly a different protocol.

    We are not yet at the 1 year mark (that will be in November), but I think right now there are no limits on what he can lift. I don't know what your surgeon would say about jet skiing, but I do know that the jolts on a jet ski can be pounding on the lower back. As far as I can tell, basketball and cardio as much as you want. Motorcycles are forbidden because of the potential trauma to the spine in a wreck...and my son's surgeon said he had seen too many kids come in with spine injuries after snowmobiling (not an issue for us) to say that would be okay. He also wanted my son to wait a while to try wakeboarding (he had never done it and had a chance to try) I think there are a few things you might have to give up, but many of your favorite workouts will be available to you after 6 months to a year.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by dolores a View Post
    Hi JDM, I don't have much to add to all of the very good words of encouragement except that I am in awe of how much knowledge you seem to have gained from research. This will help you as you go though this surgery and recovery in that there shouldn't be too many surprises! As far as the weight issue, you will have to be diligent in your diet, making sure it is healthy with lots of protein. My physical therapist also advised me that to put weight on to do a lot of resistance vs. aerobic exercises. Good luck to you in choosing a surgeon.
    Thank you for the kind words. I do already have a good diet with high protein. Like I said, I'm serious about working out, so I already take the multivitamins everyday, count my calories/protein/carbs/etc everyday to get a certain amount, and I work out daily. So hopefully I can get back to all this after surgery.

    Quote Originally Posted by WNCmom View Post
    JDM555:

    Every case is different and every surgeon has slightly a different protocol.

    We are not yet at the 1 year mark (that will be in November), but I think right now there are no limits on what he can lift. I don't know what your surgeon would say about jet skiing, but I do know that the jolts on a jet ski can be pounding on the lower back. As far as I can tell, basketball and cardio as much as you want. Motorcycles are forbidden because of the potential trauma to the spine in a wreck...and my son's surgeon said he had seen too many kids come in with spine injuries after snowmobiling (not an issue for us) to say that would be okay. He also wanted my son to wait a while to try wakeboarding (he had never done it and had a chance to try) I think there are a few things you might have to give up, but many of your favorite workouts will be available to you after 6 months to a year.
    Yeah, I thought about jet skiing, in a lake, it's really smooth, in an ocean is where the jet ski gets a little dangerous, if I take it easy, I bet I can still ride around without causing any jolts to my lower back. Idk if I'd want to risk that anytime soon. Snowmobiling? I'm in CA, that's not happening anytime soon lol. Wakeboarding is allowed? Awesome. And by working out, I don't mean like going to the gym and running on a treadmill or bike for 45 minutes then doing like ab's or something. I have a split workout, Mon-Chest/Tri's, Tue-Back/Bi's, Wed-Shoulder/Traps/Abs, Thur-Legs. So I use dumbells and machines, I stay away from free weights such as Deadlifts or Squats cause that puts pressure on the spine, but I do barbell bench. That's what you mean about your son working out with no limit right? Or did you mean just cardio/bike/etc.

  11. #26
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    Linda..thanks for the info on incisions..i saw dr boachie about 3 years ago...& the other surgeon told me dr boachie was "known" for doing side incisions at that time...

    jess

  12. #27
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    So I use dumbells and machines, I stay away from free weights such as Deadlifts or Squats cause that puts pressure on the spine, but I do barbell bench. That's what you mean about your son working out with no limit right? Or did you mean just cardio/bike/etc.
    What I mean is that when my husband, who supervises the weight work, asked about weight limits for lifting, he wasn't give any. My son is only 14 and his upper body is not super strong (hence the weights) so he is not lifting lots of weight, but the message we got is that he could lift as much as he wanted to. Again, your surgeon would give you the definitive answer in your case.

  13. #28
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    Jess, my anterior surgery was done through a small 'caesarian like' incision, in the lower abdomen. I have met a patient who had surgery ten years earlier and she had what i call 'the shark bite' incision.
    Vali
    44 years young! now 45
    Surgery - June 1st, 2009
    Dr David Hall - Adelaide Spine Clinic
    St. Andrews Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia
    Pre-op curve - 58 degree lumbar
    Post -op - 5 degrees
    T11 - S1 Posterior
    L4/5 - L5/S1 Anterior Fusion

  14. #29
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    that's cool, val...sounds like a "bikini cut"...tho i dont know anyone over the age of 25 who wears one!

    jess

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrnyc View Post
    that's cool, val...sounds like a "bikini cut"...tho i dont know anyone over the age of 25 who wears one!

    jess
    Alright, I got my MRI done, and had another appointment with Ivan Cheng. We discussed options for surgery, posterior or anterior. I think I'm leaning towards posterior, I don't want to remove a rib and have an ugly scar on my side, plus run the risk of lung issues. I want to do it over winter break, from Dec. 15 to Jan. 21 should be enough time to get back to school/rest. My rib hump is getting worse and it is annoying me daily, pretty much hourly. It affects me in the gym as well and I get embarrassed if I bend over to get water and there is a big hump on my right side.

    Here are some pictures. Like I said, very very low curve, Lumbar. I am worried about my flexibility, I have REALLY long legs, so it's going to be hard.

    http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c3.../jmimageap.jpg
    http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c3...jmimagelAT.jpg

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