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Thread: Surgery for 30 degree curve?

  1. #16
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    Jul 2009
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    I think they should change the criteria for surgery because even a 30* curve causes imbalance and disturbance in gait which can lead to arthritis or joint problems later on. I have been told I have a swayback and a weird walk. I'm sure by the time I'm 50 I will have joint problems or arthritis even if my curve remains at 30.

  2. #17
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    I also can understand about appearance related to scol, which is OFTEN pushed aside by Docs.
    Not according to Herr Weiss who claims virtually all fusions are EXCLUSIVELY done ONLY for appearance.

    This guy lives on some other planet despite being an orthopedic surgeon. I think his status as K. Schroth's grandson has clouded his thinking and forced him into some intellectually dishonest statements.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  3. #18
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    Jun 2009
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    Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pooka1 View Post
    I agree with fusing earlier than the current trigger point of 50* but don't know how much earlier. Simply having scoliosis, even a sub-surgical curve, over time, seems to predispose folks to a panoply of other problems that can be painful enough to trigger surgery anyway down the road.


    You're saying that "simply having scoliosis, even a sub-surgical curve, over time, seems to predispose folks to a panoply of other problems that can be painful enough to trigger surgery anyway down the road"?

    I'm confused about whether this is your personal belief/experience, or
    if this is actually statistically true?

    I have never heard before that non-fused scoliotic people with small curves have a greater number of orthopedic surgeries than non-scoliotic people.

    B.
    Bettina:
    - 34 year old physiotherapist
    - main curve of 3 is mid-thoracic convex, approx 37 d.
    - my goal: to stay as upright, strong and painfree as I can, as long as I can.

  4. #19
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    Jun 2009
    Location
    Westland Michigan (Between Ann Arbor and Detroit
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    Hi,
    Personally, I waited until there was nothing else to be done and I couldn't hardly walk before I had my surgery. Yes, mine was visible if you really looked, however, the possibilities of complications involved is NOT worth doing it if you don't have to. What if the surgeon you have picked isn't a top notch as someone has already mentioned. Do you know the risks involved? Foot-drop is one, paralysis is another, if the screws are not placed properly and go into the spinal cord you could end up with severe leg/foot pain or paralysis. Now, none of us can tell you what to do, obviously, however, we CAN advise you and those of us who have had the surgery can tell you, it isn't a walk in the park! I'm 49 and just had my surgery 5 weeks ago. I went through pregnancy just fine in my early-mid 20's. So. There's my 2 cents worth Take it for what it is. If you decide to go through with it, best wishes and I'll be praying for you.
    Debbie

  5. #20
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    Jan 2008
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    NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by betty14 View Post
    You're saying that "simply having scoliosis, even a sub-surgical curve, over time, seems to predispose folks to a panoply of other problems that can be painful enough to trigger surgery anyway down the road"?

    I'm confused about whether this is your personal belief/experience, or
    if this is actually statistically true?

    I have never heard before that non-fused scoliotic people with small curves have a greater number of orthopedic surgeries than non-scoliotic people.

    B.
    The reason many/most adults have far longer recuperation periods after surgery is because they have many other ancillary issues.

    The reason children are back in school a few weeks after surgery is they largely do NOT have these issues.

    Per our surgeon when asked why the huge difference in recovery rates between kids and adults.

    Combine that with the need of certain folks for surgery on sub-surgical curves for pain or instability associated with these ancillary condition. We have some testimonials on this site.

    I am seeing our surgeon in a few days. I'll try to remember the ask the question directly about incidence of ancillary issues in sub-surgical scoliosis versus general population and rates of surgical correction for these other issues in each population.

    My kid has a 36*-40* curve at least. Ask me if I thin it likely that her spine will be stable her whole life even if the curve doesn't progress. It seems highly unlikely... her various balances (sagittal, coronal, ec.) are way off. Isn't that highly contributory if not causative in these other issues?
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  6. #21
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    Oct 2005
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    Chicago north suburb
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    772
    I have a life-long friend who I saw a couple weeks ago when she was in from Florida visiting her family in Milwaukee. She has moderate scoliosis that never progressed. She carries one hip a little higher than the other, but besides that has no outward visible signs. Other than occasional bouts of sciatica during the past few years, she’s had a pain-free life and will turn 79 next month. I suspect too that her life-long slim build has worked to her advantage.

  7. #22
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    May 2009
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    3,729
    Just a note..slim all my life, my curves progressed in the last 5 years, since i herniated discs (which is REALLY easy to do)....i am now down to 96 pounds, cause i cant eat due to pain meds...& i am STILL holding off on the surgery...what i am saying is being thin has not helped my back in any way that i can see....for about 25 years, my curves must have progressed very slowly & caused no pain at all... & i would never have the surgery without it being the last resort..which it is getting to be now!! and i have also developed the added problems of arthritis in my spine, degenerative disc disease, & spinal stenosis!

    jess

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    alabama
    Posts
    6

    Lightbulb

    Hi,im new here.Was just wondering in regaurds to being worried about how you look ,is it the rib hump that bothers you or the twisted look of your back?I had the harrinton rod implanted in the mid 80s and also had a rib resection. Im still twisted a bit and still have a rib hump. The operation has left me with more pain than I had befor and im not sure the rib hump looks much better than it did. I now have large scars to hide.Im not sure and havent seen anyone eles coment on it but if its the rib hump that bothers you most maybe they have come up with a better way of fixing that these days ???But than again if you curve is still progressing having the ribs fixed now may not be a option.Does anyone eles have thoughts on this? I found a good tatoo artist who covered my hip scar with a beautifull humming bird floating on some flowers.The scar gives the tatoo a bit of texture,looks much better than plain ugly scar.lol Anyway I wanted to add that most people dont care about what we look like on the outside,,,,Its whats on the inside that counts.I hope all works out for you..

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    19
    My rib hump is fairly small. My large curve is lumbar so its the uneven hips plus undefined waistline that I hate.

  10. #25
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    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pooka1 View Post
    The reason many/most adults have far longer recuperation periods after surgery is because they have many other ancillary issues.

    The reason children are back in school a few weeks after surgery is they largely do NOT have these issues.

    Per our surgeon when asked why the huge difference in recovery rates between kids and adults.
    I'm not certain that I buy that. While complications will definitely add time to the recovery period, it seems to me that people without complications still usually recover much slower than children. I think it's got much more to do with the gradual loss of ability to regenerate cells as one ages.

    --Linda

  11. #26
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    Aug 2009
    Location
    alabama
    Posts
    6
    Yeah,I can understand that.It took a while for me to find things I could wear that didnt show my uneven hips,rid hump,scars and my shoulder blades poking out.Im am and allways have been very thin so you can see all of that if I wear the wrong thing.Some times its even hard to find pants that dont make one leg look shorter than the other.Now im 38 and kinda have gotton over it all.I have allways been very uneasy about my deformaties around new people.I do think its more just that it bothers me and most people seem to get over it quickly.My husband and our children do alot of water sport type things and thats when I really catch the looks but i know its just that people are currious and yes some will ask ,what happend to your back.I still have a 34 degree curve after having harrington rod.Its really not that hard to come to grips with the looks of it all,just have to get used to it.I kinda think of it as a teaching opertunity when someone asks about my back.I can also say it has not held me back in the public settings I get right out there...

  12. #27
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    Jan 2008
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    NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    I'm not certain that I buy that. While complications will definitely add time to the recovery period, it seems to me that people without complications still usually recover much slower than children. I think it's got much more to do with the gradual loss of ability to regenerate cells as one ages.

    --Linda
    Very astute of you not to buy that!

    I cleared this up with the surgeon. This time he mentioned your point about simply being older and the recovery rate due to that.

    But when I earlier asked why the huge difference in recovery times he said because adults often have other issues.

    As you have stated, adults in the general population have ~85% rate of back issues. At that time, I didn't realize the rate for the general population was 85% and mistakenly thought these other issues were due to simply have scoliosis over the years.

    He said the rate of these other issues is not different in scoliotics... it is 85%. That is why he answered that adults have more complications but I mistook that to mean they were triggered by scoliosis.

    I am convinced, despite my best efforts, that I have misrepresented plenty of what our surgeon has said. This is not my field and it shows.

    I am going to put a disclaimer on every comment I make about what I think our surgeon tells me that isn't easily found in the literature.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

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