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Thread: Is 30 degrees a good correction?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    313

    Is 30 degrees a good correction?

    When I saw my surgeon for the 2 week post-op, he compared my before/after posterior surgery x-rays. I got 30 degrees of correction for each of my two curves. I was 70T/77L, so that leaves me still with 40T/47L.
    (I am age 47 and had not had surgery before.)

    I guess after reading this forum and hearing all of the stories I had thought that the correction would be more than this, like down to 20 something degrees or less. My back does look straighter and I gained 1 1/2 inches in height. My surgeon said that the 30 degrees was a very good correction for me and seemed quite happy with it. Is he right?

    Deb

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sacramento,Calif.
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    420
    HI Deb,

    The degree of correction has to do somewhat with the flexibility of your spine. My Dr. told me that they try to get 50% correction but it's not always possable. Also, If your spinal cord starts to react to the manipulation of you spine your Dr. may have needed to stop the correction. I would focus on the positive, YOU GOT 1 1/2" of height back! Thats great! Also you said your back looks straight, Yea! If your Dr. is pleased it makes me think that was all he could get for you. Remember we are all very different.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    7,125
    Hi Deb...

    Suzy is correct. You probably would have gotten a lot more correction if your surgery had been both anterior/posterior. However, if I had to do it over again, I think I would probably trade my excellent correction for not having to have the anterior surgery.

    Regards,
    Linda

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NJ across from NYC
    Posts
    329

    Question for Linda or anyone else...

    In 1981, I was 27 years old and my original curves were 62/32. The 62 was brought down only to 45. Now that I read what others were corrected to, that's not much at all. I'm wondering is it because of the instrumentation they use - the Harrington Rod vs. the ones they use today? or is it because of they way they do the surgery. Just curious. Thanks - LYNN
    1981 Surgery with Harrington Rod; fused from T2 to L3 - Dr.Keim (at 26 years old)
    2000 Partial Rod Removal
    2001 Right Scapular Resection
    12/07/2010 Surgical stabilization L3 through sacrum with revision harrington rod instrumentation, interbody fusion and pre-sacral fusion L5-S1 - Dr. Boachie (at 56 years old)
    06/11/14 - Posterior cervical fusion C3 - T3 (Mountaineer System) due to severely arthritic joints - Dr. Patrick O'Leary (at age 59)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    7,125
    Hi Lynn...

    I don't think there's any way of knowing without someone looking at your surgical report. But, I think most surgeons who used Harrington implants, at least in those days intentionally applied a relatively small amount of distraction because they feared that they might damage the spinal cord.

    Regards,
    Linda

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bucks County, Pa
    Posts
    274
    Linda
    Why would you not have had the anterior done in retrospect?
    surgery 9/06
    Rothman institute

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Chicago north suburb
    Posts
    772
    Deb,

    I have to admit I was quite surprised when I saw that you had only a posterior surgery. Everything I've read and researched indicates that anterior/posterior is always recommended for people over 40 with large lumbar curves. Who was your surgeon?

    Chris

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    7,125
    Hi Dawney...

    The anterior incision was quite painful, and I ended up with an incisional hernia.

    Regards,
    Linda

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Posts
    313
    Chris,

    I sent you a Private message.

    Deb

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sacramento,Calif.
    Posts
    420
    Hi Chris,

    My Dr. said he would have to do anterior and posterior if my spine wasn't flexable enough fo a good correction. The anterior access would give him the abiity to free up the spine more. It is not always recommended for our age group just because of age, it depends on flexability of the spine. There are 40 somethings in great shape and some not so much. My Dr. had a few bone spurs to remove that helped with my correction. I guess I was one of the lucky ones. At age 43, posterior only and a lumbar correction from 49* to 8*. Who knows Chris, you may only need posterior as well............

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    137
    Hi Deb

    I also didn't get as much correction as I hoped after seeing some of the x-rays out there!

    Having said that, my surgeon was aiming to do no more than to get me 'balanced' in all directions and he certainly acheived that. He did anterior only - his preference for older gals! (Which proves nothing beyond the fact that all surgeons have their own ideas). I can still see my curves in the mirror easily (we have trained eyes now, don't we) but to everyone else I look perfectly straight. In fact, if I had these curves to start with, I would never have contemplated surgery - so maybe that's what we should focus on, not, how good a correction surgeons can get from these young things!! Lets face it, would we worry, if we hadn't see our x-rays?

    Take care
    Pip
    Double 63(T)/75(L) deg curve with big sideways shift - Surgery in UK on 8th February 2006.
    Post op 30(T)/33(L)
    http://warpedwoman.blogspot.com/

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    913
    Hi Deb,

    I had posterior only, and a 60 degree curve. What I find weird is that at first, my curve had been corrected to about 15 degrees. When I went to my first post op appointment, it had increased to about 20 something(that's what I think, it could be a bit more), and it has stayed the same since, even after I had the hook at the top/right side removed a year later. Maybe the fusion needed a few months to stabilize itself, but I don't care as much as the fact that I didn't get anterior as well.
    35 y/old female from Montreal, Canada
    Diagnosed with scoliosis(double major) at age 12, wore Boston brace 4 years at least 23 hours a day-curve progressed
    Surgery age 26 for 60 degree curve in Oct. 1997 by Dr.Max Aebi-fused T5 to L2
    Surgery age 28 for a hook removal in Feb. 1999 by Dr.Max Aebi-pain free for 5 years
    Surgery age 34 in Dec.2005 for broken rod replacement, bigger screws and crosslinks added and pseudarthrosis(non union) by Dr. Jean Ouellet

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