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Thread: Other Surgeries to Fix Scoliotic Problems

  1. #46
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    Sep 2019
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    199
    Quote Originally Posted by KathyInIowa View Post
    My case is similar to yours - I probably had a slight case when I was younger and it went undetected. I had "low back pain" for most of my adult life - starting in my early 20s but pretty tolerable. I just dealt with it. It did get worse as I got older, but it was all muscular pain that I could handle. There was nothing noticeable about my spine being slightly crooked. At some point around my early 40s, my rib hump appeared but I didn't know what it was. I went to a local orthoped and he said that was the "classic scoliosis hump - how long have you had that?" I had noticed about 4 months prior to that appointment. He did scoliosis xrays and my curve was around 24 degrees. He said that in adults it usually doesn't change much. But mine did, - my curve was getting about 2 degrees worse per year. By age 52 I was having all sorts of issues but was still fairly active so they weren't really treating me. By age 54 I was when it got really bad and I had surgery at age 55.

    By the time of my surgery, my curve was around 32 degrees - so not really all THAT bad - but it was pain the drove me to surgery. I had everything on the list: rotted discs, the one half decent disc had ruptured, stenosis, nerve impingement....

    I had a great outcome, all things considered. I still have residual "pains" that we all probably have - but they are very tolerable - nothing near what they were before surgery.

    My surgery was at TCSC - so I felt that I was in good hands. I am going up next week for my 4-year follow up x-rays. Hopefully I will hear that my nothing has shifted and it all still looks good!!

    Kathy
    Kathy, I was 10 years older than you when I had my surgery and I probably should have gotten it done sooner, by your age.
    I thought they never straightened curves as small as 32 degrees but waited until they got larger. Or is pain the determining factor, maybe it's teens that wait until their curve gets larger? I forget what Linda said.
    Last edited by Tina_R; 10-17-2020 at 10:08 PM.

  2. #47
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    Sep 2019
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    199
    I had my lumbar MRI. They didn't inject anything into me because the radiologist said it wouldn't do any good. My hardware is keeping them from getting revealing images. The MRI was a failure.

    The next thing they are going to try is a myelogram. I was told it is very expensive, so I'd better check on my insurance. Is this invasive in any way?

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    illinois
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    912
    Yes the myelogram is invasive. They inject the dye into the epidural layer of the spinal cord. The dye follows the nerve paths that lead from the spine. They access the area very low on the spine. It is unfortunate but not horrible. If there is a trapped nerve you feel a lot of pressure on that area .But again it is doable.
    T10-pelvis fusion 12/08
    Fractured t-9 six days out of surgery
    C5,6,7 fusion 9/10
    PJK at t-9
    T2--T10 fusion 2/11
    Removal of left side t6-t10. 8/14
    C 4-5 fusion 11/14
    Right scapulectomy 6/15
    Right pectoralis major muscle transfer to scapula
    To replace the action of Serratus Anterior muscle 3/16

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
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    7,119
    Quote Originally Posted by Tina_R View Post
    I thought they never straightened curves as small as 32 degrees but waited until they got larger. Or is pain the determining factor, maybe it's teens that wait until their curve gets larger? I forget what Linda said.
    Tina...

    Never isn't even close. It totally depends on the patient. For older patients who just want to reduce their pain, some may have the option of a one or two level fusion, while others have longer fusions that involve reducing the curve(s).
    Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Twain
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
    Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by jackieg412 View Post
    Yes the myelogram is invasive. They inject the dye into the epidural layer of the spinal cord. The dye follows the nerve paths that lead from the spine. They access the area very low on the spine. It is unfortunate but not horrible. If there is a trapped nerve you feel a lot of pressure on that area .But again it is doable.
    About how long did yours take, Jackie? Do they allow you to drive yourself home afterwards?
    Is there anything confining about it like being in a tube for an MRI? Or are you just on a table while it is done?

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    Tina...

    Never isn't even close. It totally depends on the patient. For older patients who just want to reduce their pain, some may have the option of a one or two level fusion, while others have longer fusions that involve reducing the curve(s).
    In that case I should have had my surgery two decades ago when my curve was probably in the thirties.

    I just found out it's rather hard to get your password reset on this site if you've forgotten it. Unnecessarily twisty process compared to other sites.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    illinois
    Posts
    912
    The test is quick. You may on your stomach and the dye is injected. Then you are taken to the CT scanner. Like a big donut. That is just minutes.
    I am not sure how quickly you can leave but you do have to lay on your back for awhile. I wasn't allowed to drive myself home.
    T10-pelvis fusion 12/08
    Fractured t-9 six days out of surgery
    C5,6,7 fusion 9/10
    PJK at t-9
    T2--T10 fusion 2/11
    Removal of left side t6-t10. 8/14
    C 4-5 fusion 11/14
    Right scapulectomy 6/15
    Right pectoralis major muscle transfer to scapula
    To replace the action of Serratus Anterior muscle 3/16

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by jackieg412 View Post
    The test is quick. You may on your stomach and the dye is injected. Then you are taken to the CT scanner. Like a big donut. That is just minutes.
    I am not sure how quickly you can leave but you do have to lay on your back for awhile. I wasn't allowed to drive myself home.
    Sounds simple and quick, I thought it would be more involved for the radiologist, that he would have to do some probing. I wonder why it is so expensive (according to the neurologist who ordered it).

    Thanks, I'll have someone drive me.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    7,119
    Quote Originally Posted by jackieg412 View Post
    The test is quick. You may on your stomach and the dye is injected. Then you are taken to the CT scanner. Like a big donut. That is just minutes.
    I am not sure how quickly you can leave but you do have to lay on your back for awhile. I wasn't allowed to drive myself home.
    I don't know if it's always the same, but the two CT myelograms I had were a little more involved. After injecting the dye, they had me contort into several different poses to get good radiographs of the trouble areas.

    Here's a good description of the process: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/heal...pies/myelogram
    Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Twain
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
    Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation

  10. #55
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    reno,nevada
    Posts
    4,201
    I had to do a double log roll while laying on the flouroscope table. This helps with the mixing process....I told them I forgot my pogo stick and they told me that would be fine. (Today's radiology joke) Iohexol was used, its iodine based.

    CT machines are thinner than MRI machines, about 30" wide vs MRI machines that are about 5 feet deep. I never had any problems with either, for MRI scans, simply close your eyes....MRI machines will produce these sounds....CT machines do not make much noise....certainly not over 100 decibels. MRI can be loud.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cSV...GeneralImaging

    The spinal tap can hurt a bit.....but it ends quickly. The CT process is easy....

    You don't want to drive after a Spinal Tap.

    I have driven after other CT scans, but not Myelograms. The way I understand it is that a myelogram requires the spinal tap, or lumbar block (same thing)

    What it's like to get a Myelogram
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZao...gnosticImaging

    Ed
    49 yr old male, now 61, the new 61...
    Pre surgery curves T70,L70
    ALIF/PLIF T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
    Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

    Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

    My x-rays
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

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