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Thread: Case study: Non-surgical reversal of scoliosis in a mature adult

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pooka1 View Post
    It's been almost a year. Do you know if that patient maintained the reduction in her curve?
    So, to clarify, the SEAS folk sent me information the first time I wrote (a year ago) showing both that the first case study patient had continued to reduce her curve over two years with a moderate amount of exercise (30 minutes of exercise three times a week).

    A follow-up cohort (34 patients) had also done well a year after starting the exercise program. Of the 34, 19 had decreased their curve more than 5 degrees, and the remainder had stayed the same. Noone had progressed. Note that these are all adult patients who are showing pretty significant decreases - for example, a 53 year old patient whose curve went from 68T, 45L to 58T, 39L.

    I just wanted to set the context, because my quote in your post makes it sound like I never heard from them about the follow-up. So, yes, I heard from them and they've shown (in a case study with two years worth of follow-up and then in a cohort study with one year's worth of follow-up) that adults can both hold and reduce a curve with minimal targeted exercise. Which is a pretty stupendous result.

    So, having set that context, no, I didn't send them a follow-up email to ask about continued studies because I was satisfied with the first follow-up. For me, it answered the question of whether one could design an exercise program which would hold (and might even reduce) a significant curve in an adult patient, having shown a reduction which was maintained with exercise for two years in the initial patient and reductions and/or maintainance for one year in the follow-up cohort.

  2. #62
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    What happened to that one patient they singled out?
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  3. #63
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    The original case study? That's the one they'd followed for 2 years who had continued to reduce her curve over the two years with 30 minutes of exercise three days a week.

    Here initial numbers were: 35T, 47L before any treatment. At the end of her second year of minimal exercise (in 2009), they were 28T, 26L. She also reduced her pain enough that she was no longer facing surgery.

  4. #64
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    So that one patient was the only person in that cohort that was started at least 2 years ago? Why do they only have a group doing it for one year?
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  5. #65
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    So, the context again. The SEAS people aren't a group of people who just do research. They're practitioners who run a treatment center. So, like anyone who does regular treatment, normally they go about their business without publishing everything that happens. And, again, like anyone who does regular treatment, when they see something really unusual, they publish a case study.

    So, this was a case study that occurred as part of their regular treatment, not an individual result plucked out of an experiment. And this result came as a great surprise to them. They weren't trying (and didn't expect) to reduce curves as part of their treatment. They were just trying to hold curves and reduce pain.

    *After* they got this unusual result, they decided to run a cohort. That's the 34 people noted in the experiment. And they track the results of the entire cohort for the year (which followed a year after their initial case study).

    So, practitioners running a treatment center see and publish an unusual event amongst their regular patients, and then follow up more experimentally with a cohort who they report fully on. Textbook science. And pretty interesting results. It's enough to make a half-Italian very proud

    BTW, maybe I'm getting deja-vu-ish with my flu, but I'd swear we had this exact same discussion a year ago. Quite alright - it's an interesting study to bring forward every year - but I am wondering if I'm going to start seeing Punxsutawney Phil.
    Last edited by hdugger; 12-06-2010 at 09:27 PM.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdugger View Post
    So, this was a case study that occurred as part of their regular treatment, not an individual result plucked out of an experiment. And this result came as a great surprise to them. They weren't trying (and didn't expect) to reduce curves as part of their treatment. They were just trying to hold curves and reduce pain.
    So was she the only patient who was given the exercises to try at that time? Or were other patients given those same exercises at the same general time and had different results?

    So while they may not have been running a trial, they very likely had SEVERAL people doing the prescribed exercises wherein exactly one showed this improvement, yes?

    Are people in the experimental group getting similar results or is she really unique in reducing the curve this much given the same PT?
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdugger View Post
    So, the context again. The SEAS people aren't a group of people who just do research. They're practitioners who run a treatment center. So, like anyone who does regular treatment, normally they go about their business without publishing everything that happens. And, again, like anyone who does regular treatment, when they see something really unusual, they publish a case study.

    So, this was a case study that occurred as part of their regular treatment, not an individual result plucked out of an experiment. And this result came as a great surprise to them. They weren't trying (and didn't expect) to reduce curves as part of their treatment. They were just trying to hold curves and reduce pain.

    *After* they got this unusual result, they decided to run a cohort. That's the 34 people noted in the experiment. And they track the results of the entire cohort for the year (which followed a year after their initial case study).

    So, practitioners running a treatment center see and publish an unusual event amongst their regular patients, and then follow up more experimentally with a cohort who they report fully on. Textbook science. And pretty interesting results. It's enough to make a half-Italian very proud

    BTW, maybe I'm getting deja-vu-ish with my flu, but I'd swear we had this exact same discussion a year ago. Quite alright - it's an interesting study to bring forward every year - but I am wondering if I'm going to start seeing Punxsutawney Phil.

    http://www.scoliosisjournal.com/content/3/1/20

    Since many years we propose specific exercises for adult scoliosis [11,12] according to the SEAS protocol [13-17], and our experience seems to sustain this possible treatment, even if we still lack data on its effectiveness.
    So it seems like they were giving these exercises out for many years and then this patient responds? So while they may not have been running a study at the time (not clear) this patient seems to be the only one in that time period who responded dramatically.

    That is more consistent with something unique about this patient than anything to do with the efficacy of the PT, no? Maybe she exercised much more than she wwas told or maybe she has something unique in her physiology.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  8. #68
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    From the paper...

    B.I. started performing SEAS exercises 30 minutes every day at home, and came to the Center every two months to check and intensify her exercises. In one year B.I. recovered her posture, and according to radiographs, she was even better than at the end of bracing treatment (March 2007, RT 32, LL 28.5 Figure ​Figure6).6).
    So she did 30 minutes a day for at least a year. Perhaps none of the other patients actually stuck with that regime.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    I'm trying to imagine how someone can massage their own back.
    we give amber massages with a massager hand held....it helps stimulate the weaker muscles.

    So it is possible a family member could help with that.
    age 15
    Daughter diagnosed at age 13
    T20 l23 10-09
    T27 L27 1/2010

    T10 L 20 in brace 4/2010
    T22 L25 12/2010 out of brace
    T24 L25 7/2011 out of brace

    Type 1 diabetes- pumping
    Wearing a Boston brace and Schroth therapy
    Faith, Hope, and Love- the greatest of these is Love


  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by reneemarie View Post
    I've been searching for more information on how to work on chest wall expansion. I came across this article regarding Martha Hawes in the Chest Journal.

    http://chestjournal.chestpubs.org/content/120/2/672.full.html#ref-4

    It mentions

    "In the current report, the achievement of a significant increase in chest expansion in correlation with the near-elimination of respiratory illness is consistent with a previous study showing that even in middle age, functional defects associated with thoracic scoliosis can be reversed measurably using physical methods."

    The study is attributed to: "Block, AJ, Wexler, J, McDonnell, EJ Cardiopulmonary failure of the hunchback: a possible therapeutic approach. JAMA 1970;212,1520-1522" but I am unable to bring up any of the details. Has anyone seen this study before?
    when doing schroth exercises they measured lung function with air peak flow meter...my dd lung function improved capacity over the week of therapy.
    it is measurable..

    Also expansion of lungs and volume of air is measurable, encourage your children to play wind instruments to develop lung capacity.

    Two of my children outgrew asthma..by swimming and playing trombone and clarinet.
    Sorry piano or guitar will not be effective.
    age 15
    Daughter diagnosed at age 13
    T20 l23 10-09
    T27 L27 1/2010

    T10 L 20 in brace 4/2010
    T22 L25 12/2010 out of brace
    T24 L25 7/2011 out of brace

    Type 1 diabetes- pumping
    Wearing a Boston brace and Schroth therapy
    Faith, Hope, and Love- the greatest of these is Love


  11. #71
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    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdugger View Post
    So, the context again. The SEAS people aren't a group of people who just do research. They're practitioners who run a treatment center. So, like anyone who does regular treatment, normally they go about their business without publishing everything that happens. And, again, like anyone who does regular treatment, when they see something really unusual, they publish a case study.

    So, this was a case study that occurred as part of their regular treatment, not an individual result plucked out of an experiment. And this result came as a great surprise to them. They weren't trying (and didn't expect) to reduce curves as part of their treatment. They were just trying to hold curves and reduce pain.

    *After* they got this unusual result, they decided to run a cohort. That's the 34 people noted in the experiment. And they track the results of the entire cohort for the year (which followed a year after their initial case study).

    So, practitioners running a treatment center see and publish an unusual event amongst their regular patients, and then follow up more experimentally with a cohort who they report fully on. Textbook science. And pretty interesting results. It's enough to make a half-Italian very proud

    BTW, maybe I'm getting deja-vu-ish with my flu, but I'd swear we had this exact same discussion a year ago. Quite alright - it's an interesting study to bring forward every year - but I am wondering if I'm going to start seeing Punxsutawney Phil.
    thanks for reposting it! good review for those of us willing to try alternative methods.
    age 15
    Daughter diagnosed at age 13
    T20 l23 10-09
    T27 L27 1/2010

    T10 L 20 in brace 4/2010
    T22 L25 12/2010 out of brace
    T24 L25 7/2011 out of brace

    Type 1 diabetes- pumping
    Wearing a Boston brace and Schroth therapy
    Faith, Hope, and Love- the greatest of these is Love


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