[QUOTE=Pooka1;80774]From the Hey clinic...

amazing-disappearing-juvenile-scoliosis.html

"Abigail is a young lady who was placed in a brace 3 years ago at age 7 and has decreased her curve from 40 degrees to 4! This is a perfect example of a juvenile scoliosis case, which you see in children between 5 and 7 years old, most of which will resolve as they get older. More than 90% of cases do NOT turn into idiopathic scoliosis."
QUOTE]

I sent Dr Hey an email shortly after Sharon posted his blog (he replied the same day) and had the opportunity to speak with him recently for 15 minutes.

He has BTW reworded his blog after a number of emails.
"Abigail is a young lady who was placed in a brace 3 years ago at age 7 and has decreased her curve from 40 degrees to 4! This is an interesting example of a juvenile scoliosis case, which you typically see in children between 5 and 7 years old. Unlike congenital, adolescent scoliosis and adult scoliosis, some juvenile scoliosis curves can improve or even resolve as they get older. Even though some juvenile scoliosis curves will improve, careful follow-up is always indicated when you have any form of scoliosis to document curves over time."

When he wrote 90% of JIS patients do not develop AIS, he did not mean to imply that their scoliosis problems are over when they hit 12 years old and they no longer are at risk of progression. He conciders JIS and AIS 2 completely different beasts.

He has seen many of his JIS pateints with mild curves improve on their own and moderate cases improve with bracing. He has never seen an AIS improve regardless of whether they were braced or not. Hence 2 completely different beasts.

JIS patients have a high chance of progression to surgical levels since they have a lot of growning ahead of them. However he said they rarely have the very rapid spurts in progression seen with AIS (ie several degrees/month) during adolesence. Bottom line - they still can progress as teens and still need to wear their brace, if prescribed.