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Thread: Spontaneous Correction

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    494

    Spontaneous Correction

    I was going to post this in further response to Linda's question about the Greek study parameters but I see the thread is locked. I hope I didnt offend anyone, perhaps the conversation took a turn towards some things best not discussed in a public forum.

    Anyway, Linda asked about initial curve information and I posted the link on the now-locked thread. I obtained the follow up paper and wanted to share the following:
    Of the 80 children who demonstrated complete spontaneous resolution of the scoliotic deformity, 41% (n = 33) had left thoracolumbar curves and 78.8% (n = 63) had an initial curve magnitude of between 10 and 12 (Table 2).

    and, Table 2 is attached.

    So these were mostly small curves which "Spontaneously" corrected. It is interesting that they didnt attribute this to measurement error. Nor did I see it spelled out if the curve went to zero or just fell below 10 degrees. Maybe I didnt read it carefully enough.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    All smaller curves

    If this sample is representative it's safe to say that in most cases it's the smaller curves that spontaneously resolve.

    10 degrees = 38 (47.5%)
    11 degrees = 20 (25%)
    12 degrees = 5 (6.25%)
    13 degrees = 7 (8.75%)
    14 degrees = 2 (2.5%)
    15 degrees = 5 (6.25%)
    17 degrees = 2 (2.5%)
    18 degrees = 1 (1.25%)

    Or looked at another way
    10-13 degrees = 70 (87.5%)
    14-18 degrees = 10 (12.5%)

    Is there a distribution for curves that shrank by 5 degrees or those that didn't progress?
    Last edited by Dingo; 04-06-2009 at 11:21 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Well, here are Tables 3 and 4

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    That table is awesome!!!

    Just so I know, did this come from that study with the huge 85,000 child sample? I think something like 1500 kids had Scoliosis out of that large group.

    That table is awesome!

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