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Thread: Is an almost 10-year-old boy juvenile?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    3

    Is an almost 10-year-old boy juvenile?

    My son was diagnosed with mild scoliosis two months before his 10th birthday. We have not yet seen the ortho, (appointment next month) but the x-ray result was reported as "mild" with no measurements. (we saw the x-ray, and the curve is noticeable but definitely under 20*) I understand that the chances that adolescent scoliosis will progress, particularly for a boy, are very low. On the other had, the chances that juvenile scoliosis will progress are very high. Some sites that I saw (like this one) put the line at 10, and others at 12. My question is, what should I be asking the orthopedist to understand whether he's "adolescent" or "juvenile?" I understand that Risser number is one measure, but is not always accurate, particularly for boys. I have a feeling that the ortho will say "wait and see," which I can accept at this point, but what's a good waiting period at this age -- 3mos? 6 mos? a year?

    I'd appreciate any help you could give me.

    Thanks,
    Gigi

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    1,809
    Hi Gigi,

    I've seen juvenile described as 3-10 years old but there's no magic number. He's growing prettly steadily now I'd guess - and for boys, the big growth spurt comes later than it does for girls, so he does have quite a bit of growth left to do and several years to do it.

    My guess is that they'd want to see him every 4-6 months, based on the exact measurement of his curve so long as it's well under 20. Closer to 20, they may say 3-4 months.

    Good luck and keep us posted,
    mariaf305@yahoo.com
    Mom to David, age 17, braced June 2000 to March 2004
    Vertebral Body Stapling 3/10/04 for 40 degree curve (currently mid 20's)

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/ScoliosisTethering/

    http://pediatricspinefoundation.org/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    672
    Hi Gigi,

    Everything Maria said was right on. My eldest son was diagnosed as AIS when he was just a couple of months past 10th b-day. My youngest (9 1/2) was just diagnosed by pediatrician-I'm sure ortho will diagnose him as JIS. I think with our boys being diagnosed so young the odds are high that it will continue to progress. Another way to measure skeletal maturity is to x-ray the hand. At this point, don't let more than 6 mos. go by without having him checked. Good luck and please keep us posted.

    Renee

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,010
    Ditto what the others said. My lay-understanding is that your son would be considered juvenile scoliosis because he's not in adolescence. AIS is typically a term used for true teenagers going through growth spurts. However, AIS is also a generically used term too. I wouldn't get hung up on classifications. He has scoliosis. You need to know why (if any reason) and then deal with it. When you do meet with a ped. orthopedic surgeon, you need to know if there are any bone malformations in the spine (this would be congenital scoliosis). If not, then ask about having an MRI done to rule out any spinal cord or hidden conditions that may complicate treatment for scoliosis. Scoliosis in young children is not common. Good luck and keep us posted.
    Carmell
    mom to Kara, idiopathic scoliosis, Blake 19, GERD and Braydon 14, VACTERL, GERD, DGE, VEPTR #137, thoracic insufficiency, rib anomalies, congenital scoliosis, missing coccyx, fatty filum/TC, anal stenosis, horseshoe kidney, dbl ureter in left kidney, ureterocele, kidney reflux, neurogenic bladder, bilateral hip dysplasia, right leg/foot dyplasia, tibial torsion, clubfoot with 8 toes, pes cavus, single umblilical artery, etc. http://carmellb-ivil.tripod.com/myfamily/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for your input!

    I feel that now I have good solid questions to bring the orthopedist, and I know what tests he should be ordering. If he doesn't go in this direction, I'll demand a referral to a pediatric specialist. In Israel, we have access to some of the best medical services in the world, but if you don't know what to ask for and how to demand it, you'll never even know the specialists even exist!

    Our appointment is Oct. 22 -- I'll post after that with an update.

    Gigi

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    3

    Update

    We went to the orthopedist today, who said the curve is between 10-15* (he didn't measure exactly), and that Yotam's feet are in much worse shape than his back -- he has terrible flatfoot! We'll be getting him remeasured for orthotics soon, and since the summer is over he'll actually be using them. (It's very hard to get a kid to wear shoes with orthotics when the average temperature is 100*). The orthopedist told us to come back in 6 months for a checkup. Meanwhile, I'm taking him to a private specialist in Tel Aviv next month to see if he says the same thing.

    The Israeli author David Grossman wrote a book once called "Some Children are Zigzag." Yotam and I have decided to adopt this title as our motto!

    Good luck to all of you
    Gigi

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    388
    I'm glad the curve is mild. Hopefully the orthotics will help not only his feet, but his back! Good luck.
    daughter, 12, diagnosed 8/07 with 19T/13L
    -Braced in spinecor 10/07 - 8/12 with excellent in brace correction and stable/slightly decreased out of brace curves.
    -Introduced Providence brace as adjunct at night in 11/2011 in anticipation of growth spurt. Curves still stable.
    -Currently in Boston Brace. Growth spurt is here and curves (and rotation) have increased to 23T/17L

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