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Thread: Breathing problems

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario CANADA
    Posts
    1

    Breathing problems

    Hello
    I am so happy I found this forum. I am 40 years old with 53 deegre thoracic scoliosis diagnosed at age 17 (that time only 32 deegrees. I went through rehabilitation centres and other facilities doing exercises. For last few years my scolisis did not progress. Stopped at 53. I did not have any major pain, until now. I am seeing my doctor once a year. He did not recomend surgery because I am neurologicaly OK, no major pain and no breathing problems until now. I feel such a disomfot in my chest. It is so hard to breath. I don't know what is going on. Is enyone had that kind of problem?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    78
    My son has neuromuscular scoliosis. He did develop breathing problems from the scoliosis. On his first checkup he was 40 degrees and he has a thoracic curve. At that time I noticed he was having apnea all the time and sometimes short of breath. His ortho doctor told me that the scoliosis was probably not the cause of it. Since, heart and lung problems don't start to occur til 90-100+ curve. Although there was nothing to explain why this was happening all of a sudden. I took my son back six months later and his curve had progressed to 65-70 degrees by then he needed oxygen at night and sometimes during the day depending on his positioning. He has had posterior spinal fusion since and I will say this his breathing is a lot better. He doesn't sound short of breath and no longer needs oxygen. Though, from what I've read you sound like you are a healthy person so my son's circumstances are much different than yours since he has cerebral palsy and a different type of scoliosis.

    I'm not sure what the possibilities are that your curve is affecting your breathing? It could be something else entirely. I just wanted to share my son's experience since he was having the same problem and his curve was in that range. I hope you're able to find an answer to your problem from your doctor.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    913
    Quote Originally Posted by skygirl
    Hello
    I am so happy I found this forum. I am 40 years old with 53 deegre thoracic scoliosis diagnosed at age 17 (that time only 32 deegrees. I went through rehabilitation centres and other facilities doing exercises. For last few years my scolisis did not progress. Stopped at 53. I did not have any major pain, until now. I am seeing my doctor once a year. He did not recomend surgery because I am neurologicaly OK, no major pain and no breathing problems until now. I feel such a disomfot in my chest. It is so hard to breath. I don't know what is going on. Is enyone had that kind of problem?
    I really doubt it has anything to do with your scoliosis(since it's not that big of a curve-over 70 degrees at least to get those types of problems), I have been fused and sometimes have breathing problems due to other things. Maybe you should try to see what other causes could bring this. It can't help, that's for sure, but I don't think it would cause big problems or it would be the main cause for breathing problems.
    Last edited by sweetness514; 09-10-2006 at 06:33 PM.
    35 y/old female from Montreal, Canada
    Diagnosed with scoliosis(double major) at age 12, wore Boston brace 4 years at least 23 hours a day-curve progressed
    Surgery age 26 for 60 degree curve in Oct. 1997 by Dr.Max Aebi-fused T5 to L2
    Surgery age 28 for a hook removal in Feb. 1999 by Dr.Max Aebi-pain free for 5 years
    Surgery age 34 in Dec.2005 for broken rod replacement, bigger screws and crosslinks added and pseudarthrosis(non union) by Dr. Jean Ouellet

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,294

    breathing problems???

    When was your curve actually last measured?

    I did have breathing problems even thought one doctor's nurse said it was unlikely . When I went to have my pulmonary function measured I had lost 30% of my lung capacity.

    On the other hand it could be from something else: asthma, smoking, heart valves, or anxiety just to name a few--and just being out-of-shape.

    The only way to really know is to see a pulmonologist and have it measured. My doctor thought it was my heart (I was 59) but I had a normal stress test and the cardiologist said it was from my deformed chest.
    Original scoliosis surgery 1956 T-4 to L-2 ~100 degree thoracic (triple)curves at age 14. NO hardware-lost correction.
    Anterior/posterior revision T-4 to Sacrum in 2002, age 60, by Dr. Boachie-Adjei @Hospital for Special Surgery, NY = 50% correction

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