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Thread: Rolling out of Bed

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    105

    Rolling out of Bed

    My daughter is having double fusion surgery next month and I just was wondering, is it the whole first year that you have to roll on your side out of bed? I know there is restrictions on bending, twisting, lifting. I just wondered if one can pull themselves out of a recliner or a lounge chair. How long till you can do this on your own or without fear of hurting your spine? If anyone knows and can answer I would really appreciate it! Just one of MANY unanswered questions. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Canada
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    91
    Hello! I had my spinal fusion three years ago, on my thoracic "C" curve measuring 81 degrees.. L5-T1 when I was seventeen.
    I rolled myself onto my side and then pushed myself into a sitting position and then stood up from there..... very slowly for quite some time. Usually the doc says to take it SUPER easy for about a year after the surgery to make sure the fusion has taken. After three years I still use a similar way of getting up, but just faster. If I remember correctly after about three months I pretty much could sit in a recliner and pull myself out...
    Now I can do almost anything, except things that require bending my upper body. I've learned to find ways to get things done.. (like picking up a pencil when I drop it...) and work around my limitations.

    I hope that answers your question....
    All the best,
    lisanicole
    Last edited by lisanicole; 03-11-2004 at 02:18 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NJ
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    1,291

    rolling out of bed

    What really worked for me was something I learned in Pilates: Tightening my abdomen and butt whenever I moved. It reduced discomfort while stabilizing my healing spine. By tightening I mean isometrically.
    Karen

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Thanks everyone for the advice. I guess it must get to be second nature to roll and squat down, etc. How soon did you guys get to carry a backpack at school again? I heard that you can't lift more than say, a gallon of milk. Does this restriction last the whole year till the spine fuses? My daughter is having a double fusion. I was wondering if next fall if she would have to use the backpack that is on wheels/with the handle.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Canada
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    91
    Peggy,

    The backpack with the wheels and handle is a good idea. I had my surgery while I was in grade twelve, I didn't wear or use a backpack for the rest of the year (I had my surgery in november, went back to school in february)... I still don't really like wearing backpacks. I just carry the book or two that I need to my classes, and leave everything else behind. My limit for a year after the surgery was a can of soup... I didn't always follow that, and when I didn't I did have more backpain.

    Hope that helps,
    lisanicole

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Northshore, suburbs near Chicago
    Posts
    185
    My curve was 48 degrees from L2 to T4. I had surgery about 5 weeks ago. I was able to return to school after 1 month and I can carry my backpack fairly easily. I am allowed to change books every period and I have a double set of text books, so that makes my load a little lighter. I also have an elevator pass (my school is four floors).

    I don't know how long I'll have to "log roll" for, but I've accidentally jerked up in bed a couple of times and it hasn't caused me any pain or broken my back . I'm really much more mobile than I ever could have imagined.

    But, everyone has a different curve and different situation so the best idea is to talk to you doctor. Hope I've been helpful!
    Charlotte

    48 degree upper curve
    L2 to T4
    Braced for 4 years
    Surgery 2/4/04

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    105
    Thanks both of you for the advice. We will do the double textbook thing too to eliminate the heavy book problem. Since she is having a double fusion from top to bottom I imagine her restrictions will be a bit tougher than some. I don't think carrying a heavy backpack all the time is good for anyone let alone scoliosis kids. Was it hard not being to lift anything above the weight of a can of soup or does it get to be second nature?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Northshore, suburbs near Chicago
    Posts
    185
    Peggy, what is your daughter's curve? Hopefully, she won't have the "can of soup" restriction because most people who are that restricted have a very large curve. After the first two weeks, I gained stability and mobility very quickly. I was lucky enough to have only a single curve, so I imagine it will be a bit more difficult for your daughter because her hips will be affected.

    Is your daughter having any ribs removed? Good luck again.
    Charlotte

    48 degree upper curve
    L2 to T4
    Braced for 4 years
    Surgery 2/4/04

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    105
    Hi Charlotte,
    My daughter's curve is 60 on top and 36 on the bottom. That was over 2 months ago so it could be worse by now. Yes, she is having ribs removed to fix her rib hump on the right side. I hear that is sometimes more painful than the spine pain. She will be wearing a brace after surgery for a minimum of 6 months too.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    45
    Hi
    In my opinion, you usually roll over on your side whether you're on the couch, bed, etc. as you're talking about on here, but after a matter of months, you basically FEEL fairly normal again, and I would think most people can get of bed sitting up, or like the previously did before the surgery. I had my surgery back in Nov., and I am getting out of bed normal again, taking showers, driving to school, I just don't carry a backpack either. I had a double set of books for my Calculus book for a while, but this semester we're into Statistics, and it's a paperback book, so it's of course not too heavy. I just don't think you have to continually roll out of bed for up to a YEAR, you're usually probably able to get out of bed normal again after a few months. Just my experiences...have a nice day!
    "Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom."
    "Talent takes you to the top. Character keeps you there."

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    45
    Peggy,
    I had rib removed as well, but more so to make me a bit more flexible, and the rib bone was used to make the actual fusion material. I AGREE--my side where my rib removed usually hurt more days than my back did, and my surgeon told me my rib might not grow back, we're not sure at the moment...after 4 months, sometimes I still get some pain w/in my side, but a lot of the pain overall w/in my side and back has decreased quite a bit, and as I said in my earlier post, I FEEL fairly normal again...but I still watch what I do because even though one may feel good one day, they're still not 100% "good and normal" again, you know? But yes...the side where the rib is removed often hurts just as much if not more than the back, from my experiences...have a nice day!
    "Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom."
    "Talent takes you to the top. Character keeps you there."

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    105
    Thanks Racin2win for the positive messages. I'm glad to see you are getting back to normal. You're smart to be careful and watch what your activities. Does tylenol help when you have a bad day? Or is the pain beyond that? Good Luck with your continued recouperation!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    45
    Hi again Peggy
    I'll tell you what, as I've mentioned on this board before, I truly just had a HIGH pain tolerance throughout my surgery experiences. I of course was on a type of morphine after surgery, but only on it for a few days. Even when I was home, I took Tylenol for only about the first couple of nights, to help relieve some pain so I could sleep. I have not been on Tylenol or any type of pain medication for months now. Really just depends on the individual. Also, after my dance classes I take a couple of nights a week, I'm really not too sore. Hope I helped ya out some, good luck!
    "Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom."
    "Talent takes you to the top. Character keeps you there."

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    105
    I hope my daughter is as lucky as you in regards to pain. She isn't a complainer but neither has she ever dealt with pain this immense. That is what I am most afraid of. Well, besides the surgery itself . Is that the pain will be overwhelming. There really is no way to prepare one for that. I can tell her its going to be bad but until you experience it...She hasn't complained once about giving blood or her injections of Procritin so she is being a trooper right now. How did your parents keep you positive right after your surgery? You sound like you have a great attitude.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    45
    Peggy,
    From what I can tell, if your daughter is already not complaining about just doing the blood donations, she is a trooper! Just tell her to keep up that positive attitude, and coping w/her surgery will be a little bit easier. I know so many people who asked me how I even dealt w/the blood donations, let alone the pain, and if she's already being good about giving blood, as long as she keeps her attitude up, her surgery will hopefully go as well as mine did!
    I honestly think I naturally just had a postitive outlook after surgery, b/c there were so many things I couldn't wait to do again, and I still yearn to do. I stay occupied w/other things...post surgery at home can be hard, but her normal routine/time spent at home like she would normally spend it, WILL get back to being almost regular sooner than she thinks. The first week or 2 at home is rough...you think it will stay that way forever, but tell her to TRUST it WON'T! As long as she takes it easy and continues what she's doing now, I think your daughter's experiences will HOPEFULLY be similar to mine. Just my opinion. Good luck
    "Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom."
    "Talent takes you to the top. Character keeps you there."

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