Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 28 of 28

Thread: Awakened during surgery

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    389
    (called evoked sensory potential).

    Here's a link explaining:

    http://www.healthsystem.virginia.ed...care/eeg-ep.cfm

    (from Karen Ocker's reply) (she is SO smart!! and has helped me a lot!!)

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    459
    I was told by my surgeon and again by the anesthesiologist during pre-admission testing 2 weeks prior to surgery that I would be brought out of sedation just enough to wiggle my toes and fingers and then be put back under and that I would not remember any of it. In addition to my orthopedic surgeon and anesthesiologist, I also had a neurosurgeon who monitored me during surgery. It's my understanding that you are NOT supposed to remember it as you should still be at a level of unconsciousness that should not allow you to be aware of or remember anything.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    913
    That's why I'm baffled as to how many remember I don't know if that's something that just happens or it's the anestesiologist's fault.
    35 y/old female from Montreal, Canada
    Diagnosed with scoliosis(double major) at age 12, wore Boston brace 4 years at least 23 hours a day-curve progressed
    Surgery age 26 for 60 degree curve in Oct. 1997 by Dr.Max Aebi-fused T5 to L2
    Surgery age 28 for a hook removal in Feb. 1999 by Dr.Max Aebi-pain free for 5 years
    Surgery age 34 in Dec.2005 for broken rod replacement, bigger screws and crosslinks added and pseudarthrosis(non union) by Dr. Jean Ouellet

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Quote Originally Posted by Shari
    I remember waking up and feeling like I was choking. I remember pointing to my throat and my Dr. nodding his head and that's all I remember.

    Shari
    Hi Shari...

    I wonder if what you remember is them actually bringing you out of anesthesia after the surgery was over. During the wake up test, the patient's eyes are still taped shut, so you shouldn't have been able to see the doctor nodding his head.

    --Linda

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Chicago north suburb
    Posts
    774
    Linda,

    Why are the eyes taped shut?

    Chris

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Hi Chris...

    I think it's to keep them moist. I volunteer in a spay/neuter clinic, and we put an ointment in the animals' eyes for that purpose.

    Regards,
    Linda

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,291

    eyes taped shut??

    Linda's right. The eyelids can drift open while the person is anesthetized allowing the corneas to dry out. That is why the eyes are taped and or have ointment applied during surgery.

    Heck, my eyes open during normal sleep!!--and get dry.
    Original scoliosis surgery 1956 T-4 to L-2 ~100 degree thoracic (triple)curves at age 14. NO hardware-lost correction.
    Anterior/posterior revision T-4 to Sacrum in 2002, age 60, by Dr. Boachie-Adjei @Hospital for Special Surgery, NY = 50% correction

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    913
    I do remember choking and not being able to breath for this last surgery, but that was after surgery and they gave me oxygen right away.
    35 y/old female from Montreal, Canada
    Diagnosed with scoliosis(double major) at age 12, wore Boston brace 4 years at least 23 hours a day-curve progressed
    Surgery age 26 for 60 degree curve in Oct. 1997 by Dr.Max Aebi-fused T5 to L2
    Surgery age 28 for a hook removal in Feb. 1999 by Dr.Max Aebi-pain free for 5 years
    Surgery age 34 in Dec.2005 for broken rod replacement, bigger screws and crosslinks added and pseudarthrosis(non union) by Dr. Jean Ouellet

  9. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Wheeling, WV
    Posts
    1,105
    Hi Linda,

    Could it have been a dream??? I assumed I felt like I was choking because I had tubes down my throat, but since my eyes would have been taped shut, I'm not sure if what I remember was real.

    Shari

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Quote Originally Posted by Shari
    Hi Linda,

    Could it have been a dream??? I assumed I felt like I was choking because I had tubes down my throat, but since my eyes would have been taped shut, I'm not sure if what I remember was real.

    Shari
    Who knows! With the drugs that they give you, I think almost anything is possible.

    --Linda

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    137
    I had a problem with the anaesthetic when they took my appendix out and they had to bring me round briefly during the op (like a wake up test). I also remember seeing the surgeon (even though I've seen it on TV that they tape your eyes shut) and wondered after if it was a dream but was told when I asked afterwards that they did really wake me. I felt nothing except that I couldn't breathe (that was why they had to wake me!). I wonder if they remove the tape (and put it back on after) so that you are less frightened when you try to open your eyes? It might explain people's differing memories.
    Double 63(T)/75(L) deg curve with big sideways shift - Surgery in UK on 8th February 2006.
    Post op 30(T)/33(L)
    http://warpedwoman.blogspot.com/

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    151
    For my surgeries they hooked these electrodes on my legs, head and back of neck. I was told this would show the Dr. my nerve function. I guess in case he gets near one or damages one. Those little needles were quite uncomfortable. Maybe because I was so anxious.
    Mattie

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Hi Pips...

    During one of the spine surgeries which I viewed, they did a wakeup test, but did not untape the patient's eyes. I don't know if it varies by anesthesiologist.

    Regards,
    Linda

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •