Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: another question---heartburn, digestion...

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    850

    another question---heartburn, digestion...

    Does anybody with severe scoliosis have any digestive issues? Tightness in the mid section? bad acid reflux.? Maybe connected, maybe not... thks,lynne: here's the start of my journal ! http://lynnebackattack.blogspot.com
    Last edited by lelc2002@yahoo; 01-16-2006 at 08:32 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,010
    Lynne,

    My son is only 10yrs old. Because of his thoracic scoliosis, his esophagus is also curved, complicating an already existing GERD issue. If your spine is curved enough, the rest of the organs have to go somewhere. Sometimes they compensate well, while other times they need medical help to function properly. I hope your heartburn isn't serious. Good luck.
    Carmell
    mom to Kara, idiopathic scoliosis, Blake 19, GERD and Braydon 14, VACTERL, GERD, DGE, VEPTR #137, thoracic insufficiency, rib anomalies, congenital scoliosis, missing coccyx, fatty filum/TC, anal stenosis, horseshoe kidney, dbl ureter in left kidney, ureterocele, kidney reflux, neurogenic bladder, bilateral hip dysplasia, right leg/foot dyplasia, tibial torsion, clubfoot with 8 toes, pes cavus, single umblilical artery, etc. http://carmellb-ivil.tripod.com/myfamily/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,802
    Hi...

    I have GERD, both before and after my scoliosis surgery, which straightened my thoracic spine almost completely. Whether or not there's a link to idiopathic scoliosis, I don't think anyone knows, and in the end, it probably doesn't matter.

    --Linda

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    137
    Hi Lynne

    You probably know from my blog that I have the same issues as you and although there's a lot of anecdoctal evidence to support the scoliosis link, there's not much else.

    My doctor checked through all possible causes (bacterial infection, hiatus hernia, excess acid production etc) and made me keep a diary of when the attacks happend and what I ate and drank each day. In the end we had to come to the conclusion that it was my spine as eating/drinking made no difference at all - straining my back in some way (usually by walking too much in my case) would bring it on.

    The diary was fascinating to do and showed a clear link so its probably worth you trying that. If you want more info on how to do it, PM me.

    Pips
    Double 63(T)/75(L) deg curve with big sideways shift - Surgery in UK on 8th February 2006.
    Post op 30(T)/33(L)
    http://warpedwoman.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,291

    Lightbulb scoliosis/indigestion/GERD

    Before my revision I had those things because my stomach was crumpled under my diaphragm. I even got out of breath after a big meal. I had a thorough gastro work-up. My doctor observed my stomach laying in it's side. She called it "watermelon stomach" from scoliosis. I add here I had triple curves. When they were reduced I lost all those symptoms.

    Karen
    Original scoliosis surgery 1956 T-4 to L-2 ~100 degree thoracic (triple)curves at age 14. NO hardware-lost correction.
    Anterior/posterior revision T-4 to Sacrum in 2002, age 60, by Dr. Boachie-Adjei @Hospital for Special Surgery, NY = 50% correction

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    850
    thks for the feedback, Karen. Pips-we seem to have similar curves -I'm very bad on the Lumbar so maybe there's some similarities. I'll try to put my x-ray on my blog soon........Lynne

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1
    My daughter has some reflux issues, and we've been able to get it under control recently enough to take her off prescription meds. One supplement I've found that I like to help with typical heartburn and acid indigestion is Acid Ease. It helps to soothe the intestines to provide relief. Now, for more severe reflux, it's important to consult with a doctor to see if stronger meds are necessary. Severe reflux that goes untreated can lead to esophageal cancer, so you want to make sure that yours isn't chronic or severe.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,802
    At IMAST last week, there was a presentation (paper #75) that concluded "This study showed that left lumbar curves larger than 30 degrees are a significant risk fact for the presence of GERD. We should consider that lumbar deformity may affect the visceral organ when evaluating Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis."
    Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Dilbert
    I'm sarcastic... what's your super power? --Unknown
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
    Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If you've signed up and are having trouble posting, please check your spam folder. An email was sent to the email address which you subscribed. You have to follow the instructions in that email. Done that and still having trouble posting? Contact Joe O'Brien at jpobrien@scoliosis.org.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    illinois
    Posts
    766
    Interesting --my heart burn went away after surgry--very interesting thought.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    3,745
    my acid reflux was caused by oral antibiotics taken after IV antibiotics were
    finished, for Lyme Disease...the oral antibiotics finally ate away at my stomach lining, it seems...
    i was put on what i was told was a strong prescription (that my insurance did not want to pay for, and that was back when i had better health insurance)...
    i was on Protonix...it worked great....

    surprised to read lumbar has an impact...makes sense it would
    be thoracic curve that would do it....??

    jess

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Warsaw, MO
    Posts
    373
    This is interesting. I wonder if after my spine is fixed if I will be able to say goodbye to the protonix. Would be nice.
    Diagnosed at age 12 with a double major curve

    Braced till age 15

    SSBOB T12-L2 Anterior age 34. (October 22,2012) Dr. Robert Gaines Jr. ( Columbia, MO)

    Revision Surgery T2-Sacrum with Pelvic Fixation Prosterior age 35 (November 13,2013) Dr. Michael Kelly (St. Louis, MO)

    Revision Surgery L4/L5 due to BMP Complication age 36 (November 20,2014) Dr. Michael Kelly (St. Louis, Mo)

    Revision Surgery due to broken rod scheduled for October 19, 2016 with Dr. Michael Kelly (St. Louis, MO)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    At IMAST last week, there was a presentation (paper #75) that concluded "This study showed that left lumbar curves larger than 30 degrees are a significant risk fact for the presence of GERD. We should consider that lumbar deformity may affect the visceral organ when evaluating Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis."
    I know this was some time ago but any idea if I can get hold of this study

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,802
    Quote Originally Posted by burdle View Post
    I know this was some time ago but any idea if I can get hold of this study
    Papers presented at meetings are not considered studies. To find the text of the presentation, I Googled IMAST 2013 PROGRAM. To find out if they actually published anything, search PubMed (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/)

    75. Scoliosis is a Risk Factor for Gastroesophageal Reflux
    Disease in Adult Spinal Deformity
    Naobumi Hosogane, MD; Kota Watanabe; Mitsuru Yagi, MD, PhD; Shinjiro
    Kaneko, MD, PhD; Hitoshi Kono; Masanobu Shioda; Masafumi Machida, MD;
    Masashi Saito; Yoshiaki Toyama; Morio Matsumoto, MD
    Japan

    Summary: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms were evaluated
    in 190 spinal disorder patients including 126 degenerative lumbar kyphoscoliosis
    (DLKS) patients using Quest (Questionnaire for the diagnosis of reflux disease).
    Fifty-nine patients were GERD positive (Quest 6). Multivariate regression analysis
    revealed that left lumbar curve larger than 30°was a significant risk factor for the
    presence of GERD (odds ratio 10.9).
    GERD symptoms should also be taken into consideration in the treatment of adult
    spinal deformity.

    Introduction: Patients with DLKS (degenerative lumbar kyphoscoliosis) are at a
    risk of developing various visceral organ disorders due to their trunk deformity.
    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the trunk deformity on
    gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
    Methods: One-hundred-ninety patients over 40 years of age (mean 70.2 years,
    51 males and 139 females) who had whole standing spine X-ray and answered
    to the Quest (Q; Questionnaire for the diagnosis of reflux disease) were included
    in this study. Quest is an 18-point scale and has been developed for the screening
    of GERD patients. Patients with Q score 6 points or more were defined as GERD
    positive. Radiological parameters including Cobb angle, sagittal alignment and
    trunk balances were measured and evaluated the relation to the Q score with
    Pearson’s correlation coefficient analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis
    was performed to evaluate the risk factors for GERD.

    Results: The average Q score was 3.7 points (-1 to 15) in whole 190 patients
    and 59 patients were GERD positive. In order to discriminate the direction of
    lumbar curve, we defined right convex curve as negative and left convex curve
    as positive value. There were 42 patients with right convex lumbar curve (mean
    -34.1°; -10 to -90°) and 84 patients with left convex lumbar curve (mean
    +33.6°; 11 to 109°). Q score was significantly correlated with lumbar Cobb
    angle (R=0.26). There were no significant correlations with sagittal parameters.
    In multivariate regression analysis, lumbar Cobb angle tended to be associated
    with the presence of GERD (Odds ration 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03, p=0.06).
    Moreover, lumbar Cobb angle larger than 30° was strongly associated with the
    presence of GERD (Odds ratio 10.9, 95% CI 2.26 - 52.80, p<0.05).

    Conclusion: This study showed that left lumbar curve larger than 30° was a
    significant risk factor for the presence of GERD. We should consider that lumbar
    deformity may affect the visceral organ when evaluating DLS patients.
    Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Dilbert
    I'm sarcastic... what's your super power? --Unknown
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
    Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If you've signed up and are having trouble posting, please check your spam folder. An email was sent to the email address which you subscribed. You have to follow the instructions in that email. Done that and still having trouble posting? Contact Joe O'Brien at jpobrien@scoliosis.org.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •