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Thread: harrington rod information

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5
    The address for the flatback article is

    http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/feistyscolioflatbackers
    I found alot of helpfull info on it.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    massachusetts
    Posts
    20

    Feisty no more

    Brandon,

    For the most part, the membership of the Feisty group moved on last July. Among other things, the moderator insisted that donations to her were in order. None the less, there is plenty of good information in the archives.

    Most of that group is now found at:

    http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Flatback_Revised/

    Maybe we will see you there, Cam

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4

    Broken Rods

    Blandon

    Have you seen anything on Broken Rods? My lower back has been killing me. I went to the Dr. and found that my rods broke L-3,L-4.

    Please e-mail me sometime: wmcbride@triad.rr.com

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4

    Harrington rods & flat back syndrome

    Hello All,
    I have had a Harrington Rod in for 18 years and it broke about 14 years ago, I cant begin to describe the effects of a bad car accident Dec 04 (not in public anyway). The best way I can describe things is to say I feel that I'm too heavy for my spine and pelvis (even though believe me I'm not) and for those that know what it means I suffer from Cauda-Equina syndrome. What is flat back syndrome? and what are its symptoms? Have any Harrington Rods had to be replaced? Sorry for all the questions, I've just found this site, any information gratefully received.
    Regards
    Sharon

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Hi Sharon...

    Flatback is the loss of lumbar lordosis. You can find a good article on the topic here:

    http://www.spineuniverse.com/display...rticle308.html

    Regards,
    Linda

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4

    Thank you

    Hi, Thanks for your response, does it make any sense to suffer from this in sort of spasms over a period of 3 to 4 days, and if so does it usually get worse? Cauda-equina is loss of anal control, would anyone else have suffered this?
    Thanks Sharon.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    80

    I have harrington rods too

    I had my scoliosis surgery in 1989 and went pain free until about 2 years ago. I have gone to two different surgeons (mine has since retired) and no one can tell why I am experiencing pain. I have had and MRI and several other tests. My lower back hurts and I have pain and numbness in my right leg, hip and foot. The tests haven't shown any problems so now they are suggesting I do the cortisone shots to see if that helps the pain. I have a problem with doing that when they have no idea why I am having pain in the first place.

    It is getting so frustrating. I am 35 now.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2
    Hi, I just joined today. I am a compression fracture dislocation at L1 victim since 1984, not a scoliosis patient. But this is one of the few places I found that I find others with a lot in common back wise. I have 2 Harrington rods from T10-L4 with fusion. They are very straight and I am sure I suffer from flatback as well as pains below the rods daily. I have read quite a few reports of similar or identical complaints that I have had for over 20 years. Has here anyone had the H-rods removed? I've been told that I would need anterior and posterior surgery and this has scared me away from it. I'm 47 years old, I'm afraid I'm getting too old to go through this much surgery. Any info is always appreciated, rickdog

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Hi Rickdog...

    Having your rods removed will probably not do anything to resolve your pain. To hopefully resolve your pain and prevent further deterioration, you'd need to having the flatback corrected.

    If you want to "meet" a lot of people who have had their flatback corrected, you can visit this forum:

    http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Flatback_Revised/

    Regards,
    Linda

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2
    "Having your rods removed will probably not do anything to resolve your pain. To hopefully resolve your pain and prevent further deterioration, you'd need to having the flatback corrected."

    Yes, I understand that, that's why it's such a long, involved surgery with a lot of blood loss with both anterior and posterior approaches. All the old fusion has to be broken out, the rods removed, then some kind of modern fixation to restore lordosis with screws, rods, pedicle subtraction osteotomy, etc. That's why I'm curious to see how this has turned out for someone in a similar situation as mine, thanks much for the link and reply, Rick

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire soon to be Arizona
    Posts
    1
    Had my surgery in 86 my pain has been about 12 years and getting worse. My husband is moving us to a diffrent climate to see if that helps.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    14
    I haven't had any problems with flatback, pain, etc. yet and I had Harrington Rods put in 20 years ago. I was active, especially in sports, as soon as I got the OK from my surgeon. Am I concerned that it could eventually happen to me? A little. I'm just going to continue on with my daily life until heaven-forbid something does happen.

  13. #28
    BentMetal Guest
    I have a harrington rod too. I had surgery in 1979. Is it not possible to have another surgery, taking out the harrington and undergoing a new surgery with a new technique? Or does the fusion prevent that? My fusion is T6 - T12. I asked a Doctor about that recently. I only spoke with the front office so far, but I have an appointment. The front office said that they've done a couple of them, but it depends on the spine's flexibility. I'm guessing too much fusion will reduce the effects of any modern day surgery.

    But wouldn't that be great. Go in, pull out the rod, put in a new one (the C-D or ?), reduce the curve even more, some thoracoplasty, and get rid of the flat back and humps (for the molst part).

    But maybe they can cut away some fusion to increase flexibility so the new technique can have some effect.

    Jon
    Last edited by BentMetal; 04-24-2006 at 10:27 PM.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Hi Jon...

    The only way to change your spine in the area of the fusion, is to remove the rod and perform an osteotomy. You can see what an osteotomy looks like here:

    http://www.spineuniverse.com/display...ell_pso-BB.jpg

    It's a big procedure, and I doubt that many surgeons would do it strictly for the purpose of getting a better cosmetic result.

    Regards,
    Linda

  15. #30
    BentMetal Guest
    Hi Linda

    Thanks for the info. Looks like a very big job, and painful at that. Do you know of any Doctors in California that have done this procedure?

    Thanks

    Jon

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