Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: leg length discrepancy

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3

    leg length discrepancy

    This is my first time here. Please bear with me as I try to explain myself. I'm 50 years old. I've had pain in my right hip area for the last 4-5 years. Have tried antiinflammatory meds, a steroid injection into the muscle which helped the pain a little bit for about a month, x-ray and MRI of hip were normal, so it's not a joint problem. Dr. finally sent me for physical therapy. She noted that my left shoulder sits lower than my right, left leg is shorter than the right, and of course scoliosis. The leg length discrepancy is just 3/16" but I'm still questioning if that's what is causing my right hip pain. The PT gave me a heel lift to use and exercises. She said the leg length discrepancy is apparent, not structural, and explained the curvature of my spine and (not sure about this) the pelvic bone is uneven where it attaches to the SI joint. So far, exercises and heel lift have not helped much but maybe I'm just not patient enough. I've known since about age 10 that I had a curvature and remember the Dr. measuring my legs but nothing was ever done and I never was bothered much until now.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,212
    Hi Kasum...

    I think that 3/16" of an inch difference in your legs is pretty normal. And, I think it's far more likely that your curvature is causing your pelvis to be high on one side and somewhat rotated.

    Is your pain on the side, or actually in the buttock? I ask because I have upper right buttock pain. Although I've never found an exercise that helps, I can minimize the pain by not sleeping on my left side with my right leg on the bed. (In other words, I need to keep my legs together.) It's very difficult to avoid sleeping in this way... I think because I spent the first 40+ years of my life sleeping on my stomach.

    Regards,
    Linda

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for responding Linda. Actually my pain is directly over the right hip area but occasionally is referred to right buttock and within the past month or so, is moving towards the mid low back. Interesting that you say 3/16" is pretty normal. I've always felt that way as well. Even so, the therapist has recommended I wear the heel lift always, including at home with just slippers on. Even in this 90 degree heat now, said I could put a heel lift on my flip-flops. I didn't think that would be necessary, but should do what is recommended just to get this pain to go away.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,212
    Hi Kasum...

    I agree. It's worth trying everything (as long as it's not costly or detremental to one's health), to get out of pain.

    Regards,
    Linda

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14

    Leg length discrepancy

    Hi las,

    Had no physical problems at all until 3 yrs ago when started with lower back pain and what was first diagnosed as a hernia. Went on to be diagnosed with groin strain, psoas bursitis, facet joint degeneration and then psoas bursitis again and now have just got an MRI scan back with says do not have psoas bursitis. Have come to the conclusion that my symptoms are caused by C curve lumbar scoliosis.

    My pain is in the SI joint and in the groin (bottom of psoas muscle) runs up the psoas muscle to the diaphragm and then get back ache where psoas joins onto back and also down the large QL muscle that runs down the side of the spine.

    If your pain is in your bum or hip and running down your leg it could be sciatica? Which is quite easily sorted out by a chiropractor. I have noticed sciatic scoliosis or scoliosis sciatic being mentioned a few times on various scoliosis sites but have not looked into it cus I dont have that but it might be worth your while looking into that. Dont know wot that is though.

    Good Luck

    Barbs

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    672
    Hi,

    I get a lot of pain/soreness across the very lower back/hip area. Right hip is higher and sticks out more and I get significantly more pain in that area, especially after sitting too long & also during menstruation. I find that stretching and excercises are what works best for me.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3
    It sounds like I should resign to the fact that it will always hurt some. It is always sore/tender to some point especially on palpation, much worse with extended walking. I am doing strengthening and stretching exercises that PT gave me. Doctor did give diagnosis of sciatica on referral for physical therapy, then therapist applied heat, e-stim with steroid, and the heel lift for the leg length difference. Maybe everything altogether will help. Thanks for all the info.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14

    Leg length discrepancy

    Hi las

    Any sciatic problems can be helped loads by a chiropractor who will also give you some wonderful stretches that will help. A Friend of mine with normal legs and back has really bad sciatica and was going regularly to see a masseur(he was quite dishy) and my chiropractor told her to lie on her back and pull the knee up to the chest on the affected side and also to sit on the floor with the legs straight out in front of you and bend the affected leg and cross it so the foot is on the outside of the other knee. (Hope thats clear) it sorted her out when shed been gardening for 4hrs and ended up seized up.

    The lady who said something about sleeping with knees together, if Im understanding you correctly you would be even better off if you slept with a firm cushion between your knees. I do this, its a pain when you turn over as the whole quilt moves with the cushion but it really helps.

    I am not a medical person so its a good idea to check these things out with your chiropractors or physiotherapists.

    Good Luck

    Barbs

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NJ across from NYC
    Posts
    329
    Linda, I also have a nagging, annoying, "sore" spot in my buttocks. If you are sitting, it's about two inches up from the bottom, not quite on the side (it's hard to explain where it is!) I have it on both sides, but the left is worse. If I press on the spot, it is so sore. I sometimes feel like I can work it but pressing on it for a long time, out but some days is worse than others. Would you know what that is from? Does anyone else experience this? Thanks! Lynn
    1981 Surgery with Harrington Rod; fused from T2 to L3 - Dr.Keim (at 26 years old)
    2000 Partial Rod Removal
    2001 Right Scapular Resection
    12/07/2010 "Surgical stabilization L3 through sacrum with revision harrington rod instrumentation, interbody fusion and pre-sacral fusion L5-S1" - Dr. Boachie - and feeling GREAT! (at 56 years old)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,212
    Hi Jacques Mom...

    Sorry, I don't. But, you might get help from a physical therapist, since I bet that it's a soft tissue problem.

    Regards,
    Linda

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    96
    I have that same pain that you have described, Kasum. I have found it worse since my recent chiropract and massage visit, which is really troubling to me. Here's some of the things I have found most helpful:
    I have applied both hot and cold at different times to the area. (The massuese said my sciatic? was swollen). I've also soaked in a hot bath before bed, and then slept on a heating pad (I have an awesome bag of corn you heat and it conforms to my humping area which feels magical!) Also, I have changed the shoes I am wearing. I am on my feet a lot and find it bothers me most if I am not wearing good shoes. I have found Clarke's to help the most with my support.
    Also, I like those exercises Barbs recommended, and I also like this one similar we do in yoga called massaging the spine. You lay on your back and bring both knees to your chest and hug them with your arms and gently roll back and forth and side to side. This really feels like it massaged my swollen hip.
    Good luck!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2

    Angry Scoliosis aggravated by Prednisone?

    I've taken Prednisone for years as part of treatment for an autoimmune disease that was causing my body to reject my liver. Inevitably I developed rapid bone density loss and osteoporosis. Only recently have I been told that I have severe scoliosis ~ I think 30%, but is that severe? Spinal MRIs say it's severe but it's all in the eye of the beholder, maybe? Whatever, I now have considerable loss in my height. I've gone from 5'6" to 5'3" with one leg so much shorter than the other, alterations to slacks recently required different length for each leg.

    I also have very severe pain in my left hip besides constant and almost crippling pain in my back and legs. I no longer can walk in a store or even to a medical appointment without a wheelchair.

    I am prescribed two 100 mcg Fentenal patches every third day plus Methadone which I rarely take, and two 300 mg Neurontin daily.

    My doctor finds and diagnoses the problems but does not refer me to a specialist nor explain the scope of my medical conditions. I now live in Oregon, having moved from Nevada 18 months ago. In Nevada I got most of my major medical care at Cedars-Sinai in LA and believe me, I miss the comprehensive care I was getting. What do I do now to get help? Am I going to be totally crippled or is it possible to recover from severe scoliosis? I apparently also have stenosis and several disks that are "bulging" but I don't think are actually herniated. I would give anything to be able to walk normally again. I have excellent insurance and can go to any doctor I want to see but how do I find the specialist(s) that I need? I'm open for aqny and all advice and suggestions.

    Geri

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,212
    Hi Geri...

    30 degrees is RELATIVELY small. However, if your osteoporosis remains unchecked, it could increase fairly rapidly. Unfortunately, even if your curve gets really large, surgery for scoliosis may not be an option because I'm guessing that your bone might not have the ability to hold the implants.

    How about trying conservative treatment (e.g., physical therapy) to see if you can reduce your pain? And, if you're not on Fosamax or other medication to improve your bone quality, I'd recommend that you find a doctor who can help you deal with the problem.

    Good luck!

    Regards,
    Linda

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,287

    bone

    I agree with Linda on the Fosamax or Actonel. These bone - building medications are given to people on steroids because long term steroid use causes osteoporosis.

    My daughter-in-laws father also has an auto-immune condition(Wenger's vasculitis) and he takes one of these meds to prevent osteoporosis. They have been proven to re-build bone.

    There is another procedure for osteoporotic vertebrae. It's called "vertebroplasty" which involves injecting a special bone cement to rebuild the vertebrea. It gives excellent results painwise and deformitywise. It does not even involve surgery.

    Karen
    Original scoliosis surgery 1956 T-4 to L-2 ~100 degree thoracic (triple)curves at age 14. NO hardware-lost correction.
    Anterior/posterior revision T-4 to Sacrum in 2002, age 60, by Dr. Boachie-Adjei @Hospital for Special Surgery, NY = 50% correction

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •