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Thread: 79% curve

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    8

    Exclamation 79% curve

    my daughter has a 79% curve. she is a patient at shrinners hospital. she is 3 1/2 yrs. old. why haven't they operated on her? isn't 79% curviture life threatening?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Hi Karen...

    At 79 degrees, a thoracic scoliosis curve can affect pulmonary function. However, it probably isn't life threatening until it's well over 100 degrees. I've known adults with thoracic curves over 130 degrees who live relatively normal lives.

    What does your Shriners surgeon say about surgery? And, which Shriners are you going to?

    Regards,
    Linda

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    8

    Unhappy no surgery yet

    she goes to the spokane shrinners. dr. there said no surgery yet, don't know what they are waiting for. she had hip surgery done this last summer. she had hip dysplasia.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,801
    Karen...

    You should push the specialist to help you understand why he thinks it's best to wait.

    Regards,
    Linda

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,010
    Karenmar,

    Welcome. My son is now 10 years old and was born with congenital scoliosis. He had part of his spine fused at 11 months old. Because of that fusion (T5-L1) his body is very short. By fusing the spine in infants/young children, the growth potential is greatly reduced. The vertebrae in the fused area continue to grow in thickness, but the growth plates are removed during fusion surgery to prevent growth. This means the vertebrae do not grow in height after fused.

    A 79 degree curve is significant. Has your daughter had a pulminary function test to see if her lungs are affected by the curve? Is her curve in the thoracic or lumbar spine? I know a girl who is now 8 years old. Last year at age 7, her thoracic curve measured 112 degrees. Oddly enough her lung function was 95%. Several docs who evaluated her were pleasantly surprised by this. Another example is my son who at age 6 had only 46% lung function with a 65 degree thoracic curve and fused ribs. Each patient is different and must be evaluated differently.

    I would suggest you get another opinion from maybe Children's Hospital in Seattle. Dr. Song and his colleagues treat many young children with scoliosis. They have extensive experience. Also, other Shriners facilities are on the leading edge of scoliosis care, including the Shriners in Philly and Salt Lake City. Since you are already part of the Shriners system, these places may be an option for you.

    These questions should be addressed to your orthopedist. Have the doc tell you what the long term game plan should be for your daughter. Make sure you have 100% confidence in your doctor. That is very important.

    Good luck and keep us posted.
    Carmell
    mom to Kara, idiopathic scoliosis, Blake 19, GERD and Braydon 14, VACTERL, GERD, DGE, VEPTR #137, thoracic insufficiency, rib anomalies, congenital scoliosis, missing coccyx, fatty filum/TC, anal stenosis, horseshoe kidney, dbl ureter in left kidney, ureterocele, kidney reflux, neurogenic bladder, bilateral hip dysplasia, right leg/foot dyplasia, tibial torsion, clubfoot with 8 toes, pes cavus, single umblilical artery, etc. http://carmellb-ivil.tripod.com/myfamily/

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