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Thread: Scoiosis AND Periooheral Neuropathy?

  1. #1
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    Scoliosis AND Peripheral Neuoropathy?

    I'm a male, age 68, diagnosed with severe idiopathic dorsal scoliosis at age 10 in 1959 -- treated successfully with spinal fusion (6 vertebrae in lower thoracic region) and confinement to a body cast. I made an excellent recovery until I developed sciatica at age 62 -- attributed to mild and slow-acting curvature below the fused potion, and which diminished without further treatment after several months.

    But about a year and a half later, I began to experience some deterioration in both my sense of balance and personal mobility; previously, and despite a difference of about 30 per cent in the size (girth and weight) of my legs, I had been able to walk up to 20 miles daily in my job as an order picker. This capacity has diminished drastically, and forced me into an involuntary retirement.

    Although physical endurance does not seem to be an issue in and of itself, I now find my gait considerably shorter -- more of a "shuffling" pattern, will experience a desire to lean forward after about 1/2 mile, and will have to rest, either seated or leaning on an upright structure. Staircases also present a challenge, particularly when descending as my left leg (the larger of the two) won't extend forward sufficiently to descend one step a time for each foot in the commonly-practiced fashion; the problem appears to be gradually becoming more pronounced, and will intensify when carrying anything -- even of negligible weight; similar problems arise when walking on broken ground,

    An Electromyogram (EMG) done last month revealed diminished feeling in both heels, but minor (same-day) surgery for a non-related (thyroid) and non-life-threatening issue has delayed an intensified, presumably holistic, approach until now, and any comments, particularly with regard to any relationship between the two issues, would be appreciated.
    Last edited by Eddie Sand; 06-09-2018 at 01:40 AM.

  2. #2
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    Eddie, You are another example of a cast scoli that made it a really long time with scoliosis, which is just amazing. This proves that fusion works and what they did back in 1959 was the correct procedure during that time period. I am sure that your surgeon would have loved to have known your 60 year outcome. To operate on a child and not know, has to be difficult. (assuming he died decades ago)

    Having scoliosis in the lumbar spine would seem to be the culprit, but nerve issues can be caused by many things. I don't know what to say other than having tests done might or will give some clues....Having a whole host of lumbar issues myself, 70 degree curve with all sorts of degeneration, 4 lumbar herniation's, and sciatica was like a smoke signal that eliminated or narrowed down the diagnostic process. I had many EMG's through the years, and always wondered if they were necessary. Smoke usually comes from fire.

    I never had a scoliosis surgeon do an EMG on me.....

    When pain hits, our gaits get altered... Our walking triggers soft tissues through our bodies, and if there is a raw area, gait changes can be expected. Many times before my fusion, I would walk into my chiro office sideways like a crab. They would say "Ed, your beat", and I would laugh and thank them for the acknowledgement. Just another day in paradise.

    Are you having any pain? Do you have the sciatica currently under control? The leg pains can be good indicators of lumbar nerve problems. I fought that battle for around 6 years leading up to my surgeries. Hot water immersion is the easiest way to pain relief. I would measure temp with a hot tub thermometer, 106 degrees F would quickly quell the bone and nerve pain. It needs to be in a deep hot tub so you can float. Prescription NSAID's are miraculous, but you need a doctor to do your blood work before a prescription. I don't know if doctors exercise hesitancy in writing prescriptions for these in senior's. It would seem logical....

    Welcome to the forum

    Ed
    49 yr old male, now 60, the new 55...
    Pre surgery curves C12,T70,L70
    ALIF/PLIF T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
    Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

    Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

    My x-rays
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Sand View Post
    I'm a male, age 68, diagnosed with severe idiopathic dorsal scoliosis at age 10 in 1959 -- treated successfully with spinal fusion (6 vertebrae in lower thoracic region) and confinement to a body cast. I made an excellent recovery until I developed sciatica at age 62 -- attributed to mild and slow-acting curvature below the fused potion, and which diminished without further treatment after several months.

    But about a year and a half later, I began to experience some deterioration in both my sense of balance and personal mobility; previously, and despite a difference of about 30 per cent in the size (girth and weight) of my legs, I had been able to walk up to 20 miles daily in my job as an order picker. This capacity has diminished drastically, and forced me into an involuntary retirement.

    Although physical endurance does not seem to be an issue in and of itself, I now find my gait considerably shorter -- more of a "shuffling" pattern, will experience a desire to lean forward after about 1/2 mile, and will have to rest, either seated or leaning on an upright structure. Staircases also present a challenge, particularly when descending as my left leg (the larger of the two) won't extend forward sufficiently to descend one step a time for each foot in the commonly-practiced fashion; the problem appears to be gradually becoming more pronounced, and will intensify when carrying anything -- even of negligible weight; similar problems arise when walking on broken ground,

    An Electromyogram (EMG) done last month revealed diminished feeling in both heels, but minor (same-day) surgery for a non-related (thyroid) and non-life-threatening issue has delayed an intensified, presumably holistic, approach until now, and any comments, particularly with regard to any relationship between the two issues, would be appreciated.
    Hi Eddie...

    I can't say that I've ever heard of the spine causing such a significant swelling of one leg (with the exception of lymphedema after anterior spine surgery). I hope you eventually discover the source of the problem. I'll be interested in hearing about it.

    In the meantime, have you tried a compression sock?

    --Linda
    Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Twain
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
    Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the replies!; there has been very little physical pain since conditions stabilized about three years ago -- although I occasionally (not upon all attempts) experience a mild sciatica, usually in the right (smaller) thigh, if walking (continuous) exceeds the 1/2 mile distance previously cited; this usually goes away quickly after even a few minutes seated.

    But I cannot seem to avoid a numbing sensation, starting at the top rear of the thighs (just below the buttocks) after sustained walking, combined with an urge to lean forward.

    In addition, and just as a point of information not previously brought up, I have, ever since the problems was first corrected nearly sixty years ago, experienced difficulty in standing stationary for a prolonged period of time; this was particularly noticeable during church services -- the liturgy of the sect in which I was raised required a period of perhaps 3-5 minutes of completely stationary standing, which I always viewed as an ordeal.

    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    I can't say that I've ever heard of the spine causing such a significant swelling of one leg (with the exception of lymphedema after anterior spine surgery). I hope you eventually discover the source of the problem. I'll be interested in hearing about it.

    Linda
    It's been a while since I inquired about it, but I was told that the disparity in size of the legs was gradually accentuated due to unequal shares of the weight carried by the two limbs during normal walking -- also a slight tilt in the angle of the pelvis itself, which might have been there even before the condition was originally diagnosed.

    Just for fun, the "Eddie Sand" pseudonym is borrowed from a pulp fiction character of the 1930's -- 40's; let's see if anybody recognizes it.
    Last edited by Eddie Sand; 06-17-2018 at 06:56 PM.

  5. #5
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    Northern California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Sand View Post
    T
    It's been a while since I inquired about it, but I was told that the disparity in size of he legs was gradually accentuated due to unequal shares of the weight carried by the two limbs during normal walking -- also a slight tilt in the angle of the pelvis itself, which might have been there even before the condition was originally diagnosed.
    I've never heard that before. If it's true, it has to be pretty rare, as I can't say I've ever heard of anyone else with this issue.
    Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Twain
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
    Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation

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