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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2

    Athlete with a rare case

    Hey everyone. I’ve been a lurker on here and other Scoliosis forums for quite sometime. I have been doing my absolute best to educate myself on the condition and all the possible treatments. Well to begin..I am a 26 years old male. I am a professional bodybuilder, or at least used to be. I started training at the age of 15, and won the Canadian Junior nationals twice at the ages of 19 and 20. When I was 23 I started developing severe pain in my right shoulder, elbow, hip and knee. I continued with my training and started with your standard Physio/Chiro rehab stuff. Ever since the pains have got progressively worse to the point that at the present time I can no longer train at all. According to the ultrasounds I have developed tendonitis in my shoulder and elbow and have lost over 30lbs of muscle as a result of not being able to train.

    Now here is where the scoliosis comes in. When I was 19-20 I noticed that when I would train I would always be a bit asymmetrical. In other words, any lift that I would perform with a barbell, the barbell it self would be slightly crooked on both the horizontal and vertical plain. I never really thought much of it. When the pains got bad at 23 I tried to fix this issue, but noticed that I physically couldn’t. It wasn’t a matter of strength, I just could not do any exercise symmetrically regardless of whether I was lifting 300lbs or 10lbs. I sought help at the time,had an X-ray of the spine and that’s were my research started. I wasn’t really given diagnosis. I was told that my cervical spine is straight, T spine is straight, but there is a very mild lateral deviation of the lumbar spine measuring under 10 degrees. Now I understand that a curve under 10 degrees is nothing to worry about is and is technically not even categorized as scoliosis. I ended up seeing an orthopaedic surgeon anyways and after some other imaging tests it was discovered that although the lateral deviation in my spine is very slight, there is a significant rotation aspect to it - something that would usually be present for curves with much larger cobb angles. So basically although I barely have any lateral deviation, I have pronounced rotation of the spine. The orthopaedic surgeon basically told me that it is what it is, and that there is nothing that could be done.

    I wanted to ask if anyone on here from the US has any advice for me. I live in Canada, so seeking multiple opinions from professionals is very hard. It takes 2-3 months to see a single orthopaedic surgeon here. I am looking to travel to the US to see if any of the surgeons can help me. I am not sure exactly who to seek help from, but I figured spinal surgeons, especially those specializing in scoliosis would be the most qualified. I’ve discussed my issue with a sport medicine doctor and I was told that my problem can not be resolved without surgical intervention. I have basically got the the point where I would have to quit my career as a professional athlete unless the issue of my back is addressed. So although I do not fit the category of the standard scoliosis patient that requires surgery, the problem is significant enough to end my career if not addressed.The pain that I have is situated in the shoulder/elbow/knee, but those are essentially symptoms that have developed over the years from wear and tear directly as a result of the asymmetrical loading while training - caused by the rotation in the spine.

    Thanks for any input. J
    Last edited by Wayacrucis; 02-07-2018 at 12:40 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    reno,nevada
    Posts
    3,677

    Second Opinion by Dr Pashman (Los Angeles)

    Dr Pashman down in Los Angeles will do 2nd opinion consults by e-mail or mail which is a good reason to have your x-rays burned to disc. Usually, the scoliosis x-rays are full x-rays, neck to pelvis, sagittal plane or side views are just as important as coronal or front views. Dr Pashman is a scoliosis surgeon.

    http://espine.com/obtain-a-second-opinion/

    http://espine.com/

    I was also an athlete.....and we pay our dues for our sport. But you know, I wouldn't change a thing if I had to do it all over.

    Where are you located in Canada?


    Ed
    49 yr old male, now 59, the new 55...
    Pre surgery curves C12,T70,L70
    ALIF/PLIF T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
    Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

    Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

    My x-rays
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by titaniumed View Post
    Dr Pashman down in Los Angeles will do 2nd opinion consults by e-mail or mail which is a good reason to have your x-rays burned to disc. Usually, the scoliosis x-rays are full x-rays, neck to pelvis, sagittal plane or side views are just as important as coronal or front views. Dr Pashman is a scoliosis surgeon.

    http://espine.com/obtain-a-second-opinion/

    http://espine.com/

    I was also an athlete.....and we pay our dues for our sport. But you know, I wouldn't change a thing if I had to do it all over.

    Where are you located in Canada?


    Ed
    Thank you. I am in the GTA.

    Itís been very difficult to get help. The typical doctor takes a look at my X-ray, says this is nothing to be worried about and to get on with my life. They often assume that I am obsessing over being symmetrical or simply have one side stronger than the other.

    Most do not have any sort of sport medicine background, so trying to explain that having a profession in a sport that requires lifting heavy weights while one shoulder is more forward than the other is just asking for injuries. The biomechanics of one side of the body is completely different than the other when the spine is rotated/bent. The fact of the matter is that my everyday life is not impacted from this condition, hence why Itís immediately dismissed by most doctors. I would not have any problems IF I did not do this for a living/as my passion. But the bottom line is that this sport is my profession, my passion, my income and something that Iíve worked for 10 years. So itís very hard for me to accept that this is just ďthe way I amĒ while treatment to fix my problem exists.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    317
    Maybe you could send your x-rays to a surgeon who specialises in rotation to get an opinion.

    The world of scoliosis is fraught with a lack of treatment for anything but severe curves. This is because otherwise you could be trading one set of problems for another by trying to treat it. It may be that you just have to live with it and adjust your lifting methods to accommodate your body.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    28
    There was a lot of stuff on the forum about torso rotation exercises over the years. I'm not sure if anybody following through with them has regularly checked in, but in theory they strengthen the rotatory muscles around your spine with the idea to reduce assymmetries. Usually rotation drives curve progression and vice versa, it's a vicious cycle, but I've never heard of anybody having severe rotation without lateral curvature. It does sound like a pretty rare case, and I hope you find some answers and be able to do what you love!

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