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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Not my second daugther too

    The girls had their physical today.

    My younger daughter’s shoulders have always been slightly rounded (this has been a problem for her in gymnastics), but recently her lower spine has been looking as though it is hyper curved. I marked it down to being a mom with an overactive imagination but, decided to ask her ped to check it out during their upcoming physical. Before I could bring up the subject, the ped informed me she was sending my 12yro for a scoliosis x-ray. I started to ask her if she meant kyphosis or lordosis instead of scoliosis, but realized I didn’t know much about either type of curvature and the ped wouldn’t be able to answer my questions anyway, so I let it go.

    What would be the odds of BOTH of my girls having scoliosis?

    I am so upset.

    My heart sank as I scheduled an appointment with an ortho today. We’ll see him on the 24th after she returns from her STEM camp.

    A Mom

  2. #2
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    Jan 2008
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    Wow I am so sorry to hear that. But you really need to wait until the surgeon weighs in on this. Most curves are small and never progress. Try to keep that in front of your mind.

    I think there is only about an 11% chance a full sibling will also have AIS but I am not sure about that.

    Good luck.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  3. #3
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    Question not accurately presented

    Logically, you are right about the risk of progression and waiting until an ortho has seen my child. At the moment, however, I am thinking with my emotions.

    My husband just came home and reassured me our girls are doing what they are supposed to do--worry their parents. A hug goes a long way. I'm awfully glad I married him.

    My question about the odds of my second daughter having scoliosis wasn't fairly presented. Our children are adopted from different families. I was thinking about the small percentage of children with the disorder and wondering what the odds were against both of our girls having it. In case anyone else is asking the same question, but considering siblings by blood, here is the first article I came across after I read your response. I didn't check to see if it is of good quality, but did note the location was reputable.

    A Mom

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2674301/

    Curr Genomics. 2008 March; 9(1): 51–59.
    doi: 10.2174/138920208783884874
    PMCID: PMC2674301
    Understanding Genetic Factors in Idiopathic Scoliosis, a Complex Disease of Childhood
    Carol A Wise,1,2,3,* Xiaochong Gao,1 Scott Shoemaker,4 Derek Gordon,5 and John A Herring2,6
    Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ►
    This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
    Go to:

    Abstract
    Idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most common pediatric spinal deformity, affecting ~3% of children worldwide. AIS significantly impacts national health in the U. S. alone, creating disfigurement and disability for over 10% of patients and costing billions of dollars annually for treatment. Despite many investigations, the underlying etiology of IS is poorly understood. Twin studies and observations of familial aggregation reveal significant genetic contributions to IS. Several features of the disease including potentially strong genetic effects, the early onset of disease, and standardized diagnostic criteria make IS ideal for genomic approaches to finding risk factors. Here we comprehensively review the genetic contributions to IS and compare those findings to other well-described complex diseases such as Crohn’s disease, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. We also summarize candidate gene studies and evaluate them in the context of possible disease aetiology. Finally, we provide study designs that apply emerging genomic technologies to this disease. Existing genetic data provide testable hypotheses regarding IS etiology, and also provide proof of principle for applying high-density genome-wide methods to finding susceptibility genes and disease modifiers.

    Key Words: Scoliosis, genetics, inheritance, genome-wide association.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMom View Post
    Logically, you are right about the risk of progression and waiting until an ortho has seen my child. At the moment, however, I am thinking with my emotions.

    My husband just came home and reassured me our girls are doing what they are supposed to do--worry their parents. A hug goes a long way. I'm awfully glad I married him.

    My question about the odds of my second daughter having scoliosis wasn't fairly presented. Our children are adopted from different families. I was thinking about the small percentage of children with the disorder and wondering what the odds were against both of our girls having it.
    I'm sorry AMom. I think you did mention that at some point. I am on a new machine and did not port over my emails yet from the old one.

    The prevalence in any child is about 3%. Two children who are not related would be considered independent cases so I assume the approximate odds are 0.03 * 0.03 = 9 in 10,000 which is close to 1 in 1,000.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    224

    Inital good news

    Quick Note: Haven't seen the ortho, but I just picked up the x-rays. They ped didn't request a lateral view, but the one she did ask for shows a fairly straight C-T-L spine (per my non-professional opinion). Have to wait to get the ortho's reading and opinion on whether he wants a side view.
    A Mom

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    224

    only 11 degrees

    Saw the ortho today, he requested a side view of the lumbar area (said it looked okay) and measured my younger daughter’s thoracic curve at 11˚. He’d like to see her again in Mar 2014. Eleven degrees is tiny. I asked about her shoulders and he checked and said that it is positional and recommended yoga to strengthen the muscles. He said it isn’t necessary to address the back pain she has felt over the years, that if it exceeds the need for otc meds to let him know.

    A Mom

    Age: 12.11
    Riser: forgot to ask
    Tanner: 3
    Menstrual Cycle: 5 months
    Height: 60"
    Curve: T7-T12, right, 11 degrees

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