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Thread: coordination dynamics therapy

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    coordination dynamics therapy

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17191736

    With our tools and methods available to repair the lesioned CNS by reorganizing (relearning), it became also possible to diagnose instability and deterioration of integrated functions of the CNS in patients with severe lesions or minor defficiencies in the organization of the CNS, such as scoliosis.

    http://www.codytherapy.net/eng-reorg...s-abstract.htm

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    It has been talked about quite a bit on here that many people with scoliosis have problems with proprioception. I can see this therapy helping with this problem (our coordination issues) but not much else. The article primarily discusses retraining nerves damaged by lesions on the brain and spinal cord.
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    If coordination issues may be improved, probably also the posture (with the current structure), so if this method could get a significant improvement in this sense it would be a good news. It could be part of a mixed solution. It should if it would be the best in this sense.. except costs would be very highs
    Last edited by flerc; 04-14-2013 at 09:52 AM.

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    Improving posture is probably only a short-term thing. If braces can't (reliably) prevent anterior overgrowth then I doubt posture can. It probably can improve cosmesis if the curve stops progressing on its own.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

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    I know posture may be improved at least for decades. I have a very much better posture now than 3 decades ago..I seems to be tallest. I believe I have a perfect posture, that is the best my structure allows to have. The same occurs having scoliosis, you may a have the best posture your altered structure allows or the worst.
    And of course it would be something good to have the best. There are something as a bad posture vicious cycle even keeping the same structure.. but the permanent bad posture may affect your structure in a bad way.

    But also good posture might get good changes in your structure or at least counteract (at some level) others bad factors. Surely the most dramatic structural changes because posture are during growth. But of course, is difficult that turning only a bad factor in a good one, the scoliosis problem would be solved.
    If there is a cause leading to an anterior spinal overgrowth (I suppose you are refering to this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16133084 ), other method should to be discovered to counteract it.

    I don't know really if a brace used under right conditions cannot solve that problem and probably if it cannot is because rigid braces are essentially the same than a half millenium ago.
    I'm sure an antigravitational super brace constructed with high tech would help kids, teens, adults, old people and also if they had surgery or not.. but nobody seems to be interested in it.

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    I think that this could be one portion of a non-surgical treatment plan. If the scoliosis is not severe and it is determined that there is a proprioception problem, then it could be implemented. It is well known that posture during an x-ray can influence curve magnitudes, at least on L curves and TL curves. People tend to be shorter later on in the day. My height varies so much when I am measured that there would be no way of accurately detecting a problem unless I shrank a whole lot. I've been measured anywhere between 5'6 and 5'8. That's a HUGE variance in someone with scoliosis.

    The problem with this treatment is that it doesn't seem to be a feasible treatment for those with large or rapidly progressing curves or those who have no issues with proprioception. People in those categories just wouldn't benefit, as I see it. The rest of us that seem to fall through the cracks that DO have issues with proprioception, like myself, "might" benefit to some degree. But the big question is, what would the benefit be? Would it be standing taller, having better coordination, less pain? If the benefits aren't big enough to make a large impact on the person's quality of life, then it wouldn't be worth the cost of the treatment. Insurance companies would want to see a definite decrease in doctor's visits and procedures for pain control after this treatment to even consider paying for it. The insurance carrier could care less if we stand taller or dance better. They just want us to quit going to the doctor.
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    Post of the month nomination

    Quote Originally Posted by rohrer01 View Post
    The insurance carrier could care less if we stand taller or dance better. They just want us to quit going to the doctor.
    LOL. Post of the month nomiination!
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

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    Quote Originally Posted by rohrer01 View Post
    The insurance carrier could care less if we stand taller or dance better. They just want us to quit going to the doctor.
    Yes, surely they also could care less if we gain the habit to take a bath every day, no?

    Depending the cause-effect chain of the problem, a strategy may be correcting some secondary causes as surely proipioception, coordination.. are. Surely it would not be enough, but who said it should?

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    And certainly I'm more interested in knowing what could be part of a scoliosis solution than knowing what insurance carrier could care or not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rohrer01 View Post
    If the scoliosis is not severe and it is determined that there is a proprioception problem, then it could be implemented.
    Are you sure this method has to do (regardless if certainly may improve it) with propioception?

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    Quote Originally Posted by flerc View Post
    And certainly I'm more interested in knowing what could be part of a scoliosis solution than knowing what insurance carrier could care or not.
    For those of us who can not afford treatment without insurance, this is a HUGE concern.
    As for this being a proprioception issue, I guess I'm at a loss as to what else it could be in the general idiopathic scoliosis population. Most of us don't have lesions on our spinal cords. Hdugger's son is an exception but doesn't have IS.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdugger View Post
    From the links I found on coordination dynamics therapy, it didn't sound like it. (But I can't be certain). It sounded more like the kind of therapy my boyfriend with the brain hemorrhage would have had to try to regain the parts of the motor cortex that he had lost.

    I had the sense that the propioception problem had more to do with having a sense of where your body was in space. I suspect that that skill can be learned/improved more easily then these experiments where they're restoring damaged areas of the brain.
    I can't imagine that not knowing where your body parts are relative to the rest of your body doesn't affect coordination. What else could it be? (honest question, not being snarky)
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    Quote Originally Posted by flerc View Post
    Yes, surely they also could care less if we gain the habit to take a bath every day, no?

    Depending the cause-effect chain of the problem, a strategy may be correcting some secondary causes as surely proipioception, coordination.. are. Surely it would not be enough, but who said it should?
    Insurance carriers don't care what we do as long as we don't smoke or go to the doctor. period..
    I never implied that this would be a stand-alone therapy. I agreed with you about including it in a treatment plan. However, I think that it would only benefit a limited population, unless you include those with fusions. I was assuming that you were thinking that it would help some people avoid progression when implemented with other therapies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rohrer01 View Post
    For those of us who can not afford treatment without insurance, this is a HUGE concern..
    Of course, but first we should to know how could be a solution of this kind (since nobody else seems to be looking for it) and then if insurance may be interested or not. The first step would be to know if current methods attacking some current causes are effectives or not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hdugger View Post
    From the links I found on coordination dynamics therapy, it didn't sound like it. (But I can't be certain). It sounded more like the kind of therapy my boyfriend with the brain hemorrhage would have had to try to regain the parts of the motor cortex that he had lost.

    I had the sense that the propioception problem had more to do with having a sense of where your body was in space. I suspect that that skill can be learned/improved more easily then these experiments where they're restoring damaged areas of the brain.
    Yes, I also understand is a sense giving the space notion.. an imput while coordination is an ouput. Both (probably not the only ones) leads to balance wich in turn (sure not the only ones) leads to posture. We should to transform vicious cycles in virtuous ones and improving coordination should be good for that.

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