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Thread: Alternative to surgery? Chiropractor?

  1. #46
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    Well, may you people have some questions to email them to my surgeon and get answers? some people here in forum are more experienced than me and they already were through all that.. So they know what exactly i should ask from my surgeon.

    Some questions that i have until now are:

    - From where my fusion will start and will end?
    - Will I get fusion only on my back or side and front too?
    - When I ll be able to travel to my home town (450 km) after the surgery done? by airplane? or by car and ferry? (I have a family house to stay for the days until i m allowed to travel back home)
    - What things shall I bring with me for the days in clinic?
    - What clothes?
    - When my pre-op appointment will be, and what examines will take place?
    - When i have to give blood if i needed during surgery?

    These are the questions that come to my mind right now. Please add more questions that i need to know before surgery.

    Things I know until now are:

    - The material of rods, screws etc. will be titanium.
    - Cost of surgery (doctors/materials/clinic..)
    - I can choose rooms between 'single' (just me in room), 'double' (with 1 more patient in same room), 'triple' (with 2 more patients in same rooms).

    """ If i forgot something, I ll add it here or by new reply """

    Thanks,

    Spyros
    25 Years old male with thoracic 68 degrees and lumbar 34 degrees of scoliosis.

    Straight Position: Attachment 1432
    Bent to the Right: Attachment 1430
    Bent to the Left: Attachment 1429
    Side Position: Attachment 1431
    Pelvis: Attachment 1438

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    25

    short leg

    Since our curves are about the same when I last had them measured, I thought I would share some thoughts and experience. I was diagnosed as a teenager but did not have any serious symptoms until I turned 60 (6 years ago). I started having low back and sciatic discomfort. That started a long journey visiting my primary care, PT's, Chiros, Orthos. I wasn't having any success. Finally, a physiatrist recommended to have my legs and spine x-rayed to establish a baseline. Much to my surprise, I had 68T, 42 L curves, a 3/4 " short left leg and a twisted pelvis. The reason I am mentioning this is to see if you have been measured for a short leg. Once I knew my measurements, I was fitted for a heel lift. I wanted a square foundation before I started a long term physical therapy program. I have worn the lift and have been doing a PT program for 3 years. I never contemplated surgery.

    What if you (like me) have a significant short leg.....you get the surgery to straighten your spine but you still have an alignment problem. I am no expert but I believe that will end up with post surgery pain issues as well. I would, at the minimum, discuss this issue with your doctor.
    Here's hoping you do not have a short leg.

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkochis View Post
    Since our curves are about the same when I last had them measured, I thought I would share some thoughts and experience. I was diagnosed as a teenager but did not have any serious symptoms until I turned 60 (6 years ago). I started having low back and sciatic discomfort. That started a long journey visiting my primary care, PT's, Chiros, Orthos. I wasn't having any success. Finally, a physiatrist recommended to have my legs and spine x-rayed to establish a baseline. Much to my surprise, I had 68T, 42 L curves, a 3/4 " short left leg and a twisted pelvis. The reason I am mentioning this is to see if you have been measured for a short leg. Once I knew my measurements, I was fitted for a heel lift. I wanted a square foundation before I started a long term physical therapy program. I have worn the lift and have been doing a PT program for 3 years. I never contemplated surgery.

    What if you (like me) have a significant short leg.....you get the surgery to straighten your spine but you still have an alignment problem. I am no expert but I believe that will end up with post surgery pain issues as well. I would, at the minimum, discuss this issue with your doctor.
    Here's hoping you do not have a short leg.
    I dont think i have a shorter leg, my steps are perfect. I think if i had a issue like that i would have noticed it. But i will mention that case to my surgeon as well.

    Thanks for interesting.
    25 Years old male with thoracic 68 degrees and lumbar 34 degrees of scoliosis.

    Straight Position: Attachment 1432
    Bent to the Right: Attachment 1430
    Bent to the Left: Attachment 1429
    Side Position: Attachment 1431
    Pelvis: Attachment 1438

  4. #49
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    Dec 2012
    Posts
    25
    There are a couple measurements a qualified person can make to determine short leg. (other than an x-ray). In some cases, the scoliosis cure is caused by the short leg. It is the bodies method of staying in balance. The body gets twisted in order to keep the shoulders level and feel balanced. My point is that you may have a short leg and not know it. It is wise that you have chosen to have a discussion.

  5. #50
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    May 2009
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    3,745
    i have a thoracic curve of 42 and a lumbar of 70...but i do
    not have one leg shorter than the other...it is NOT true of everyone

    good luck, Spyros..i am sure you will do well...
    oh...one more question might be whether the surgeon wants you in
    a brace after surgery, just to keep you safe for a while.

    jess

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrnyc View Post
    i have a thoracic curve of 42 and a lumbar of 70...but i do
    not have one leg shorter than the other...it is NOT true of everyone
    I am wondering if an orthopedic surgeon determined through radiographs if she really has a shorter leg or if it was just a physiatrist, whatever that is, claiming it despite no objective medical findings. I would not believe it unless an experienced orthopedic surgeon said it.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  7. #52
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    Spyros

    I had to google map Corfu and see that its and island.....I am guessing you are having your operation in Athens? A flight would happen quickly.....

    I would call and get a e-mail address for asking questions....

    Ask about autograft and allograft. Where will the fusion material come from? They used to get material from the pelvis but many patients complained of pain.

    Ask how long he thinks recovery will be?

    Ed
    49 yr old male, now 58, the new 53...
    Pre surgery curves C12,T70,L70
    ALIF/PLIF T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
    Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

    Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

    My x-rays
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pooka1 View Post
    I am wondering if an orthopedic surgeon determined through radiographs if she really has a shorter leg or if it was just a physiatrist, whatever that is, claiming it despite no objective medical findings. I would not believe it unless an experienced orthopedic surgeon said it.
    Physiatrists are MD's that specialize in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Here is the definition according to this website:

    http://www.aapmr.org/patients/aboutp...ysiatrist.aspx

    "What is a Physiatrist?
    Page Content
    Physiatrists, or rehabilitation physicians, are nerve, muscle, and bone experts who treat injuries or illnesses that affect how you move
    Rehabilitation physicians are medical doctors who have completed training in the medical specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R). Specifically, rehabilitation physicians:

    •Diagnose and treat pain
    •Restore maximum function lost through injury, illness or disabling conditions
    •Treat the whole person, not just the problem area
    •Lead a team of medical professionals
    •Provide non-surgical treatments
    •Explain your medical problems and treatment/prevention plan
    The job of a rehabilitation physician is to treat any disability resulting from disease or injury, from sore shoulders to spinal cord injuries. The focus is on the development of a comprehensive program for putting the pieces of a person's life back together after injury or disease – without surgery.

    Rehabilitation physicians take the time needed to accurately pinpoint the source of an ailment. They then design a treatment plan that can be carried out by the patients themselves
    or with the help of the rehabilitation physician’s medical team. This medical team might include other physicians and health professionals, such as neurologists, orthopedic surgeons, and physical therapists. By providing an appropriate treatment plan, rehabilitation physicians help patients stay as active as possible at any age. Their broad medical expertise allows them to treat disabling conditions throughout a person’s lifetime."

    I see a physiatrist who has referred me for a surgical consult for my scoliosis. I have what he calls impingement syndrome of the right scapula. It's caused a rotator cuff injury because of the scoliosis. It can't be repaired unless the impinged scapula is brought back into normal alignment by straightening the spine. Otherwise, it will continue to be reinjured. We'll see what the surgeon says this time. Anyway, that's just my little bit of info on physiatrists that I've found. These docs have been THE most concerned and helpful to try to figure things out and manage my pain. Mine does a lot of muscle work via trigger point injections, botox, and some nerve blocks. He referrs me for the epidurals and PT for muscle massage. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is a whole subspecialty in our Neurosciences department at the hospital.
    Last edited by rohrer01; 02-11-2013 at 12:28 AM. Reason: add quotations and color
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  9. #54
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    Rohrer, thanks for that. I learned something.

    Good that they are medical doctors.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  10. #55
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    Ed, Yes i m having my operation in Athens, thats why i wanna ask about when i ll be able to flight back home.

    Quote Originally Posted by titaniumed View Post

    Ask about autograft and allograft. Where will the fusion material come from? They used to get material from the pelvis but many patients complained of pain.
    I dont understand anything from what you just said :P

    What exactly is autograft and what allograft? can you explain the differences?

    The fusion material? You mean the titanium?

    What material they get from the pelvis?

    I'm confused :/
    Last edited by Spyros; 02-11-2013 at 09:50 AM.
    25 Years old male with thoracic 68 degrees and lumbar 34 degrees of scoliosis.

    Straight Position: Attachment 1432
    Bent to the Right: Attachment 1430
    Bent to the Left: Attachment 1429
    Side Position: Attachment 1431
    Pelvis: Attachment 1438

  11. #56
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    2,004
    Quote Originally Posted by rkochis View Post
    short left leg and a twisted pelvis.
    Yes, them are some of the unbalances (probably the last because the first) doing the structure more weak in the battle against the gravity force. It's a matter of physics, so the only question is how much significative may be. Differences or anormalities in Feet arches also may provoke the same effect than short leg. I believe the worst of all is the slope of the line from coccyx to head, but probably also surgery solve it..
    All of this problems may be tested al least up to some level at home, but I beleive the best is to see an osteopath.

    Quote Originally Posted by rkochis View Post
    I wanted a square foundation before I started a long term physical therapy program.
    What kind of program is this?

  12. #57
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    Dec 2012
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    The PT program I do daily (after much research trial and error) is made up of aerobic (treadmill), focused light weight training (dumbbells), symmetrical deep breathing stretches, and a isometric/yoga program. All movements incorporate RAB Schroth breathing. I hope to get re-measured this year to see if my curves have changed. I can absolutely state that my body has changed (both in appearance and conditioning).
    I will have my annual physical on Mar 1 and hope to get a referral to a non surgical adult scoliosis specialist to review and hopefully endorse my program.

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by rohrer01 View Post
    Physiatrists are MD's that specialize in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Here is the definition according to this website:

    http://www.aapmr.org/patients/aboutp...ysiatrist.aspx

    [COLOR="#800080"]"What is a Physiatrist?
    Page Content
    Physiatrists, or rehabilitation physicians, are nerve, muscle, and bone experts who treat injuries or illnesses that affect how you move
    Rehabilitation physicians are medical doctors who have completed training in the medical specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R). Specifically, rehabilitation physicians:
    In fact Physiatry or kinesiology is not strictly limited to rehabilitation physicians knowledge/procedures. Is something incredible vast, with hundreds of different specializations focused in absolutely different goals and principles . What have to do Vojta with Sohier? Only one example over literaly thousands possibles.
    But Physiatry not include all western disciplines as Chiropraxia.. also not Osteopathy, the wisest of all those disciplines for me.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkochis View Post
    The PT program I do daily (after much research trial and error) is made up of aerobic (treadmill), focused light weight training (dumbbells), symmetrical deep breathing stretches, and a isometric/yoga program. All movements incorporate RAB Schroth breathing. I hope to get re-measured this year to see if my curves have changed. I can absolutely state that my body has changed (both in appearance and conditioning).
    I will have my annual physical on Mar 1 and hope to get a referral to a non surgical adult scoliosis specialist to review and hopefully endorse my program.
    It sounds great even I'm not sure to understand at all the goal of that combination. Did you considered the Spinecor for adults? I'm almost sure that for someone looking for reduce some degrees is a must.

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkochis View Post
    a non surgical adult scoliosis specialist
    This doesn't exist to my knowledge. Orthopedics is a surgical specialty. Maybe Linda or someone can correct me if I'm wrong.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

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