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Thread: Some research humor - with some real truth to it

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    Some research humor - with some real truth to it


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    Yes, especially when you have undergrads doing your work for you! LOL Who gets credit then, the mastermind, aka Ph.D., or the grunt laborer who did all the gruelling hours of tortuos labor, staying late into the night to finish an experiment, aka the undergrad?

    I don't mean "you" personally, just in general, since many scientists teach at universities in order to get monies and a lab.

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    That was pretty good.

    I think I mentioned a colleague of mine wanted a "Journal of Zero" to collect all the experimental results where no difference or change was noted that nobody wants to publish. These are results also and if they don't get published, folks probably repeat the experiments and get zeros also.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

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    Quote Originally Posted by rohrer01 View Post
    Yes, especially when you have undergrads doing your work for you! LOL Who gets credit then, the mastermind, aka Ph.D., or the grunt laborer who did all the gruelling hours of tortuos labor, staying late into the night to finish an experiment, aka the undergrad?

    I don't mean "you" personally, just in general, since many scientists teach at universities in order to get monies and a lab.
    I've yet to come across any data from an undergrad that is publishable. :> I read a quote somewhere about summer med students (and I think it's appropriate for anyone rotating through a lab for the summer or semester). "Find me a med student that only doubles my work load, and I'll be impressed." I've had one or two every summer for the last five years. It would be rude to say what I really think of their work. So I'll say that at least I'm impressed that they had the drive (had parents that made them) contact me and come to 'work'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pooka1 View Post
    That was pretty good.

    I think I mentioned a colleague of mine wanted a "Journal of Zero" to collect all the experimental results where no difference or change was noted that nobody wants to publish. These are results also and if they don't get published, folks probably repeat the experiments and get zeros also.

    I honestly think that publishing in this type of journal would/should be just as notable as any other high impact journal. To be able to carry out an experiment that yields negative/zero results and have other scientists confirm your experiment and results would be a pretty impressive thing. I totally want a manuscript in that journal. And hey, if I design a PT experiment for AIS I should get published there in no time. ZING!!!! :> Thank you, I'll be here all week. Be sure to try the veal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin_Mc View Post
    I've yet to come across any data from an undergrad that is publishable. :> I read a quote somewhere about summer med students (and I think it's appropriate for anyone rotating through a lab for the summer or semester). "Find me a med student that only doubles my work load, and I'll be impressed." I've had one or two every summer for the last five years. It would be rude to say what I really think of their work. So I'll say that at least I'm impressed that they had the drive (had parents that made them) contact me and come to 'work'.
    Well I'm slightly surprised. Med students are grad level and yet I have seen several projects done by folks in the "Research Experience for Undergraduates" (REU) NSF program who did very credible jobs. The main point is so they begin to learn how to do research so anything more is gravy but they still do a good job. Nothing cutting edge obviously but could build to a Masters in some cases.


    I honestly think that publishing in this type of journal would/should be just as notable as any other high impact journal. To be able to carry out an experiment that yields negative/zero results and have other scientists confirm your experiment and results would be a pretty impressive thing. I totally want a manuscript in that journal. And hey, if I design a PT experiment for AIS I should get published there in no time. ZING!!!! :> Thank you, I'll be here all week. Be sure to try the veal.
    Do you do comedy in your off hours? :-) And there is no humanely-raised veal to my knowledge by the way. It is the least humane farm animal industry as far as I know.

    I think an impediment to a "Journal of Zero" is that you have to be so tight with everything such that the issue doesn't arise that the experiment was simply done wrong, perhaps even inadvertently (mislabeled reagent, out of date reagent, etc.). That's why the data should be out there so they can be replicated just like positive results.

    Science works best by disproving wrong ideas so that plays into the Journal of Zero (and PT/AIS research). :-)
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

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    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pooka1 View Post

    Do you do comedy in your off hours? :-) And there is no humanely-raised veal to my knowledge by the way. It is the least humane farm animal industry as far as I know.
    Yeah, I should have gone with "be sure to tip your waitress".

    Quote Originally Posted by Pooka1 View Post
    I think an impediment to a "Journal of Zero" is that you have to be so tight with everything such that the issue doesn't arise that the experiment was simply done wrong, perhaps even inadvertently (mislabeled reagent, out of date reagent, etc.). That's why the data should be out there so they can be replicated just like positive results.

    Science works best by disproving wrong ideas so that plays into the Journal of Zero (and PT/AIS research). :-)
    That's exactly my point. If you can do such a tight experiment that people will believe your negative results, then I think that's extremely valuable. We've got several pockets of data from various projects that will never see the light of day (decided by my PI). It's good negative data. I personally think it tells part of an interesting story and even fits in with a current line of thinking. But since it's a non-result, he doesn't want to publish it. Oh well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin_Mc View Post
    I've yet to come across any data from an undergrad that is publishable. :> I read a quote somewhere about summer med students (and I think it's appropriate for anyone rotating through a lab for the summer or semester). "Find me a med student that only doubles my work load, and I'll be impressed." I've had one or two every summer for the last five years. It would be rude to say what I really think of their work. So I'll say that at least I'm impressed that they had the drive (had parents that made them) contact me and come to 'work'.
    Well, I certainly hope that I didn't more than double my prof's workload. My work went to the NCUR, and as far as I know will be a snippet in her publication. ;-)

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