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Thread: How do you handle winter boots?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY, USA
    Posts
    157

    How do you handle winter boots?

    Hi all,

    I'm close to a job offer which will have me back to work full-time, this time at a customer location about 50 miles east of where I live. I was working there right before the surgery in January.

    Though it will be a few months yet before I have to worry too much about snow, I've got to start thinking now about how I'm going to handle getting boots on in the morning, especially since I won't be able to plan on having my husband tie them for me every morning before I leave the house. If we have a typical Central New York winter this coming season, I'd probably need to worry about boots from late November to mid-April. Last year was far from typical; less than 60 inches of snow for the season. The average yearly snowfall for this area is about 120 inches, but some areas average 300 inches or more. The magic dividing line which seems to divide the lower snowfall totals from the higher snowfall totals is one that I will have to cross in order to get to work each day if the offer comes through. The snow I'm referring to is primarily lake effect snow from Lake Ontario (usually light and fluffy and fairly dry), though we sometimes also get the heavier wet snow as well.

    The snow boots that I typically wear everyday are similar to http://www.zappos.com/dunham-addison-black; they are a previous model also made by Dunham. As you can see from the image, they have laces. I don't expect to be able to tie them myself, as I still can't tie my sneakers yet. What I do most days now is wear shoes with a velcro closure that are much looser than what I would normally wear if I could tie my shoes. Then I just slip my foot in and out. But I can't imagine being able to do the same thing with a pair of boots -- especially not a pair of boots that I would feel comfortable walking through the snow in. While it generally doesn't get that icy here, there can sometimes be a small amount of ice under the snow, and I just don't think I'd feel safe walking outside with loose boots on. I had a really nasty fall on the ice almost 20 years ago (was out of work for almost two months after the fall due to arm, wrist and shoulder pain), and don't want that to ever happen again.

    I would be grateful for any advice/suggestions you can share. I'd particularly like to hear from those of you who also live in snowy climes where going to work during an active snowstorm, even a heavy one , is done regularly.

    -- Thanks,
    Mary
    Last edited by mdtaffet; 09-10-2012 at 01:43 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    3,261
    I know I may seem to be the wrong person to give advice on how to put boots on, because I live in a subtropical area. But I do have hiking boots. And joggers (walking boots.) I've found the best way is the same way I put socks on. Sit on bed, place foot on opposite knee and put the boot on. Good luck!
    Surgery March 3, 2009 at almost 58, now 63.
    Dr. Askin, Brisbane, Australia
    T4-Pelvis, Posterior only
    Osteotomies and Laminectomies
    Was 68 degrees, now 22 and pain free

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    570
    Hi Mary,

    I am the wrong person to give an advice too since I didn't have the surgery yet and live in California, but here is the thought. What if you buy boots with a zipper and use a knitting hook to pull that thingy on the zipper up? Here is the picture of the hook.

    http://www.amazon.com/Darice-Easy-Kn...=knitting+hook

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    reno,nevada
    Posts
    3,547
    Mary,

    Oh, we get the snow out here...Donner summit is one of the top 5 snowiest spots on earth. 900 inches 2 seasons ago. Iíve gotten spoiled and usually donít bother unless its at least 20 inches overnight. Thatís what happens after 50 years of storm skiing.

    For those boots, get them double tied just right, not too tight and use a long shoe horn. I have one that is around 20 inches long. You can invert the horn to raise the tongue, insert foot, then transfer to back of heel.

    I donít use my shoe horns anymore...I tie my shoes normally now. You will get there in time.

    Make sure you carry provisions when traveling by car in snowstorms.... It can save your life. I carry a lot of gear when I go into the mountains....I put more prep into this than I did my surgeries. If you need a list just ask.

    Ed
    49 yr old male, now 58, the new 53...
    Pre surgery curves C12,T70,L70
    ALIF/PLIF T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
    Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

    Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

    My x-rays
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY, USA
    Posts
    157
    Quote Originally Posted by JenniferG View Post
    I've found the best way is the same way I put socks on. Sit on bed, place foot on opposite knee and put the boot on. Good luck!
    Jennifer,

    I doubt that will ever work for me again. It is currently impossible for me to get a foot on the opposite knee. My legs just don't want to bend that far that high up. It is actually quite painful to get them even close, so I no longer even try.

    Believe me, if I thought that would work, I'd have been doing it much earlier with my sneakers. But at this point I just don't think I'll ever be able to actually tie shoes myself again. That is, unless that lack of flexibility improves after this point in recovery, which for me is now 8 1/2 months.

    Any other ideas?

    -- Thanks,
    Mary

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY, USA
    Posts
    157
    Quote Originally Posted by Irina View Post
    Hi Mary,

    I am the wrong person to give an advice too since I didn't have the surgery yet and live in California, but here is the thought. What if you buy boots with a zipper and use a knitting hook to pull that thingy on the zipper up? Here is the picture of the hook.

    http://www.amazon.com/Darice-Easy-Kn...=knitting+hook

    Irina,

    Thanks for your suggestion. I've never worn boots with a zipper before, and I don't know that I would be able to find any that would fit me, but I'll take a look see to see if New Balance or Dunham sells anything fitting that description. I wear a men's 8 EEEE shoe, generally with an SL-2 last, motion control and lots of cushioning, and removable insoles so I can insert my prescription custom orthotics, and I also have very wide calves. So I usually use boots that just barely come up over my ankles. That's good enough for most snows, then I have a higher pair of LL Bean boots (also tie) that I wear on the days when my feet would get soaked in shorter boots.

    -- Thanks,
    Mary

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bethel, Alaska
    Posts
    13

    Boots for winter

    I live in winter boots in Alaska for at least six months per year. I use the PAC boots (mine are made by Kamik) and can simply step into and out of them. I have "ice cleats" on the bottom of them and you should be able to buy them at REI or other types of outdoor stores. These aren't pretty, but they feel like I'm wearing house shoes. They have a felt lining that comes out. I then carry my slip-on shoes for work in a bag and put them on when I get there. This is pretty common up here. I haven't had my surgery yet...probably in December of this year, so I haven't gone down that road as far as many of you have, but the boots I wear should not be a problem. I've worn these for years and they are great for warmth and stability. Just a little bulky to get used to.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    3,261
    There you are Mary! Knitter's boots sound perfect. Probably good news to lots of scoli patients.
    Surgery March 3, 2009 at almost 58, now 63.
    Dr. Askin, Brisbane, Australia
    T4-Pelvis, Posterior only
    Osteotomies and Laminectomies
    Was 68 degrees, now 22 and pain free

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