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Thread: new knees/new hips

  1. #1
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    new knees/new hips

    Has anyone had a knee or a hip replacement done after a long fusion? I feel my knees not lasting forever with the extra kneeling that I do now.

    Melissa
    Melissa

    Fused from C2 - sacrum 7/2011

    December 8, 2014 - Another Broken Rod Surgery

  2. #2
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    Melissa,
    You will have to gradually build up your quadriceps muscles and that will protect your knees. Try to go down on one knee rather than squatting as squatting is very hard on the knees. I have had knee problems since age 40, but by keeping my quads strong, I am hoping to never have a knee replacement. When you are sitting in a chair, do some leg lifts. That will help strengthen the quads.

    How are you feeling now that you are home? I hope recovery is going well for you.

    Sally
    Diagnosed with severe lumbar scoliosis at age 65.
    Posterior Fusion L2-S1 on 12/4/2007. age 67
    Anterior Fusion L3-L4,L4-L5,L5-S1 on 12/19/2007
    Additional bone removed to decompress right side of L3-L4 & L4-L5 on 4/19/2010
    New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, MA
    Dr. Frank F. Rands735.photobucket.com/albums/ww360/butterflyfive/

    "In God We Trust" Happy moments, praise God. Difficult moments, seek God. Quiet moments, worship God. Painful moments, trust God. Every moment, thank God.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by loves to skate View Post
    Melissa,
    You will have to gradually build up your quadriceps muscles and that will protect your knees. Try to go down on one knee rather than squatting as squatting is very hard on the knees. I have had knee problems since age 40, but by keeping my quads strong, I am hoping to never have a knee replacement. When you are sitting in a chair, do some leg lifts. That will help strengthen the quads.

    How are you feeling now that you are home? I hope recovery is going well for you.

    Sally
    I am home but recovery is not going well at all. I am in much pain . My surgeon does not want me to do anything until October 5th when he will see me

    Thanks for asking

    Melissa
    Melissa

    Fused from C2 - sacrum 7/2011

    December 8, 2014 - Another Broken Rod Surgery

  4. #4
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    I'm so sorry to read about your pain. Please just lie down and ride it out and I hope it improves quickly. Regarding knees. My knees vaguely hurt for a few weeks after coming home and I really thought I was in line for replacement, but it was just that they were getting used to the extra load of work that spinal fusion puts on them. Pretty soon the pain went away and now I'm thinking they'll last me out.

    What pain meds are you at at the moment?

    It's still so early for you. It can be a horrible time. I hope tomorrow is much better.
    Surgery March 3, 2009 at almost 58, now 63.
    Dr. Askin, Brisbane, Australia
    T4-Pelvis, Posterior only
    Osteotomies and Laminectomies
    Was 68 degrees, now 22 and pain free

  5. #5
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    My son was complaining about sore knees soon after his second surgery and it lasted for a while when we got home as well. I also noticed he had quite a bit of swelling in his ankles and I was told that it was b/c he was so sedentary during his five week hospital stay. He was supposed to use his walker with the weights attached to it but he became too tall for it after a week or two (can't quite remember) and it couldn't be made taller otherwise it wouldn't fit through doorways so he did a lot of sitting instead and did some leg exercises. Once we were home and free from the halo/weights and he could walk around as much as he wanted to his knees stopped hurting, the swelling in his ankles went away and slowly but surely he's gaining back muscle tone and is getting stronger.

    On that note, my daughter joked this morning about how I still make his bed and clean his room for him even though he's fifteen and in high school now but I explained to her that it's quite tricky for me who has not had spine surgery to make his bed b/c it is quite high off the ground, the mattress is super thick and the sheets barely fit on them and I have to flop myself on his bed and roll over to stretch the sheets and pull them tight otherwise they slip off; I feel like a contortionist. She had never even thought about how hard seemingly simple tasks can be especially when you've just had 'major' surgery(s).
    Son 14 y/o diagnosed January 20th. 2011 with 110* Curve
    Halo Traction & 1st. surgery on March 22nd. 2011
    Spinal Fusion on April 19th. 2011

    Dr. Krajbich @ Shriners Childrens Hospital, Portland Oregon



    http://tinyurl.com/Elias-Before
    http://tinyurl.com/Elias-After

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by loves to skate View Post
    Melissa,
    You will have to gradually build up your quadriceps muscles and that will protect your knees. Try to go down on one knee rather than squatting as squatting is very hard on the knees. I have had knee problems since age 40, but by keeping my quads strong, I am hoping to never have a knee replacement. When you are sitting in a chair, do some leg lifts. That will help strengthen the quads.

    How are you feeling now that you are home? I hope recovery is going well for you.

    Sally
    I will try to go down on one knee instead of squatting. My recovery is not going well at all. I am in much pain. I was put on steroids yesterday
    Melissa

    Fused from C2 - sacrum 7/2011

    December 8, 2014 - Another Broken Rod Surgery

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JenniferG View Post
    I'm so sorry to read about your pain. Please just lie down and ride it out and I hope it improves quickly. Regarding knees. My knees vaguely hurt for a few weeks after coming home and I really thought I was in line for replacement, but it was just that they were getting used to the extra load of work that spinal fusion puts on them. Pretty soon the pain went away and now I'm thinking they'll last me out.

    What pain meds are you at at the moment?

    It's still so early for you. It can be a horrible time. I hope tomorrow is much better.
    Thanks Jennifer
    Melissa

    Fused from C2 - sacrum 7/2011

    December 8, 2014 - Another Broken Rod Surgery

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mabeckoff View Post
    I will try to go down on one knee instead of squatting. My recovery is not going well at all. I am in much pain. I was put on steroids yesterday
    Melissa, Hold onto a table or kitchen counter when you go down on one knee. It will be much easier for you.
    Sally
    Diagnosed with severe lumbar scoliosis at age 65.
    Posterior Fusion L2-S1 on 12/4/2007. age 67
    Anterior Fusion L3-L4,L4-L5,L5-S1 on 12/19/2007
    Additional bone removed to decompress right side of L3-L4 & L4-L5 on 4/19/2010
    New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, MA
    Dr. Frank F. Rands735.photobucket.com/albums/ww360/butterflyfive/

    "In God We Trust" Happy moments, praise God. Difficult moments, seek God. Quiet moments, worship God. Painful moments, trust God. Every moment, thank God.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by loves to skate View Post
    Melissa, Hold onto a table or kitchen counter when you go down on one knee. It will be much easier for you.
    Sally
    I will try that
    Thanks
    Melissa

    Fused from C2 - sacrum 7/2011

    December 8, 2014 - Another Broken Rod Surgery

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elisa View Post
    My son was complaining about sore knees soon after his second surgery and it lasted for a while when we got home as well. I also noticed he had quite a bit of swelling in his ankles and I was told that it was b/c he was so sedentary during his five week hospital stay. He was supposed to use his walker with the weights attached to it but he became too tall for it after a week or two (can't quite remember) and it couldn't be made taller otherwise it wouldn't fit through doorways so he did a lot of sitting instead and did some leg exercises. Once we were home and free from the halo/weights and he could walk around as much as he wanted to his knees stopped hurting, the swelling in his ankles went away and slowly but surely he's gaining back muscle tone and is getting stronger.

    On that note, my daughter joked this morning about how I still make his bed and clean his room for him even though he's fifteen and in high school now but I explained to her that it's quite tricky for me who has not had spine surgery to make his bed b/c it is quite high off the ground, the mattress is super thick and the sheets barely fit on them and I have to flop myself on his bed and roll over to stretch the sheets and pull them tight otherwise they slip off; I feel like a contortionist. She had never even thought about how hard seemingly simple tasks can be especially when you've just had 'major' surgery(s).
    that does sound like a tricky bed to make. I thought I'd never be able to put sheets on a bed again. However, much to my surprise and my husband's delight, I can do so now without a problem. LOL I shouldn't have tried and then hubby would still have to do it on a regular basis. (not that he won't if I ask him--it's just the point).

    Just goes to show you how much you can do after this surgery that at one point you thought would always be an impossibility.
    __________________________________________
    Debbe - 50 yrs old

    Milwalkee Brace 1976 - 79
    Told by Dr. my curve would never progress

    Surgery 10/15/08 in NYC by Dr. Michael Neuwirth
    Pre-Surgury Thorasic: 66 degrees
    Pre-Surgery Lumbar: 66 degrees

    Post-Surgery Thorasic: 34 degrees
    Post-Surgery Lumbar: 22 degrees

  11. #11
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    Question Steroids??? From the Mayo Clinic:

    Does your surgeon know about this?

    Because oral corticosteroids affect your entire body instead of just a particular area, this form is the most likely to cause significant side effects. Side effects depend on the dose of medication you receive. Within days or weeks of starting oral therapy, you may have an increased risk of:

    Elevated pressure in the eyes (glaucoma) Fluid retention, causing swelling in your lower legs Increased blood pressure Mood swings Weight gain, with fat deposits in your abdomen, face and the back of your neck When taking oral corticosteroids longer term, you may experience:

    Cataracts High blood sugar, which can trigger or worsen diabetes Increased risk of infections Loss of calcium from bones, which can lead to osteoporosis and fractures Menstrual irregularities Suppressed adrenal gland hormone production Thin skin, easy bruising and slower wound healing .

    Reduce your risk of corticosteroid side effects
    Despite their side effects, corticosteroid drugs remain an important medical treatment. To get the most benefit with the least amount of risk:

    Try lower doses or intermittent dosing. Newer forms of corticosteroids come in varying strengths and lengths of action. Ask your doctor about using low-dose, short-term medications or taking oral corticosteroids every other day instead of daily. Switch to nonoral forms of corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids for asthma, for example, reach lung surfaces directly, reducing the rest of your body's exposure to them and leading to fewer side effects. Make healthy choices during therapy. When you're on corticosteroid medications for a prolonged period, talk to your doctor about ways to minimize side effects. You may need to reduce the number of calories you eat or increase your physical activity to prevent weight gain. Exercise can help reduce muscle weakness and osteoporosis risks. And taking calcium and vitamin D supplements and prescription bisphosphonates, such as alendronate (Fosamax) or risedronate (Actonel), can minimize bone thinning due to corticosteroids. Take care when discontinuing therapy. If you take oral corticosteroids for prolonged periods, your adrenal glands produce less of their natural steroid hormones. To give your adrenals time to recover this function, your doctor may reduce your dosage gradually over a period of weeks or even months. If the dosage is reduced too quickly, you may experience fatigue, body aches, lightheadedness and difficulty recovering from minor illnesses. Weigh the risks and benefits of corticosteroids
    Although they may cause a range of side effects, corticosteroids may also relieve the inflammation, pain and discomfort of many different diseases and conditions. If you work with your doctor to make choices that minimize side effects, you may achieve significant benefits with a reduced risk of such problems
    Original scoliosis surgery 1956 T-4 to L-2 ~100 degree thoracic (triple)curves at age 14. NO hardware-lost correction.
    Anterior/posterior revision T-4 to Sacrum in 2002, age 60, by Dr. Boachie-Adjei @Hospital for Special Surgery, NY = 50% correction

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karen Ocker View Post
    Does your surgeon know about this?

    Because oral corticosteroids affect your entire body instead of just a particular area, this form is the most likely to cause significant side effects. Side effects depend on the dose of medication you receive. Within days or weeks of starting oral therapy, you may have an increased risk of:

    Elevated pressure in the eyes (glaucoma) Fluid retention, causing swelling in your lower legs Increased blood pressure Mood swings Weight gain, with fat deposits in your abdomen, face and the back of your neck When taking oral corticosteroids longer term, you may experience:

    Cataracts High blood sugar, which can trigger or worsen diabetes Increased risk of infections Loss of calcium from bones, which can lead to osteoporosis and fractures Menstrual irregularities Suppressed adrenal gland hormone production Thin skin, easy bruising and slower wound healing .

    Reduce your risk of corticosteroid side effects
    Despite their side effects, corticosteroid drugs remain an important medical treatment. To get the most benefit with the least amount of risk:

    Try lower doses or intermittent dosing. Newer forms of corticosteroids come in varying strengths and lengths of action. Ask your doctor about using low-dose, short-term medications or taking oral corticosteroids every other day instead of daily. Switch to nonoral forms of corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids for asthma, for example, reach lung surfaces directly, reducing the rest of your body's exposure to them and leading to fewer side effects. Make healthy choices during therapy. When you're on corticosteroid medications for a prolonged period, talk to your doctor about ways to minimize side effects. You may need to reduce the number of calories you eat or increase your physical activity to prevent weight gain. Exercise can help reduce muscle weakness and osteoporosis risks. And taking calcium and vitamin D supplements and prescription bisphosphonates, such as alendronate (Fosamax) or risedronate (Actonel), can minimize bone thinning due to corticosteroids. Take care when discontinuing therapy. If you take oral corticosteroids for prolonged periods, your adrenal glands produce less of their natural steroid hormones. To give your adrenals time to recover this function, your doctor may reduce your dosage gradually over a period of weeks or even months. If the dosage is reduced too quickly, you may experience fatigue, body aches, lightheadedness and difficulty recovering from minor illnesses. Weigh the risks and benefits of corticosteroids
    Although they may cause a range of side effects, corticosteroids may also relieve the inflammation, pain and discomfort of many different diseases and conditions. If you work with your doctor to make choices that minimize side effects, you may achieve significant benefits with a reduced risk of such problems
    Whom is this directed towards?
    Melissa

    Fused from C2 - sacrum 7/2011

    December 8, 2014 - Another Broken Rod Surgery

  13. #13
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    Location
    NJ
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    Question Steroids

    Quote Originally Posted by mabeckoff View Post
    I will try to go down on one knee instead of squatting. My recovery is not going well at all. I am in much pain. I was put on steroids yesterday
    Melissa, Does your spine surgeon know about the steroids?
    Original scoliosis surgery 1956 T-4 to L-2 ~100 degree thoracic (triple)curves at age 14. NO hardware-lost correction.
    Anterior/posterior revision T-4 to Sacrum in 2002, age 60, by Dr. Boachie-Adjei @Hospital for Special Surgery, NY = 50% correction

  14. #14
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    Nov 2010
    Location
    British Columbia
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    Karen, this is Melissa's quote from another thread...
    "He is putting me on medrol (like cortisone) for 6 days . If it does not help, he wants me to come in on Wednesday for Xrays"

    BTW, that was very informative post about steroids. When my older boy had HSP when he was twelve and spent an entire month in the hospital, he was on a high dosage of prednisone to keep his kidneys from spewing protein (very inflamed) and he gained so much weight and got the typical 'moon face' and he was so hungry all the time. I noticed too that his behaviour was weird and he became a bit reckless and did things he normally wouldn't do, like jump off a two story balcony. I was advised about the weight gain and behaviour issues but never knew anything about how it affects your bones and healing. Interesting.
    Son 14 y/o diagnosed January 20th. 2011 with 110* Curve
    Halo Traction & 1st. surgery on March 22nd. 2011
    Spinal Fusion on April 19th. 2011

    Dr. Krajbich @ Shriners Childrens Hospital, Portland Oregon



    http://tinyurl.com/Elias-Before
    http://tinyurl.com/Elias-After

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karen Ocker View Post
    Melissa, Does your spine surgeon know about the steroids?
    As Eliza showed you, my surgeon is the one who put me on steroids and I am going to see him tomorrow

    Thanks for caring
    Melissa

    Fused from C2 - sacrum 7/2011

    December 8, 2014 - Another Broken Rod Surgery

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