Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 40 of 40

Thread: Out of curiosity...

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    8,903
    Quote Originally Posted by Doodles View Post
    Just wondering...do most people have this measured ? My rib hump or amount of rotation, I guess, was measured at 12 a year after surgery and is now at 14 degrees. Is this typical? Until a year ago I didn't know such a measurement existed. It was almost like a weird level that was put on my back as I bent over. Janet
    I have never seen anyone measure rotation on either of my kids. I have never seen a scoliometer in person. Clearly, though, the surgeon makes mental notes as to how much he will have to correct and be able to correct.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Los angeles
    Posts
    122
    Janet,
    Yes, my rib hump was measured and pre-op was 75 degrees, post-op is 37. I understand the logic of fusing and swelling, but I still se a bit more rib hump in my back now at almost 5 month post-op than 2 month post op. I am most def going to ask about this to Dr. Pashman at my 6 month visit. I'm might just be gaining weght or being paranoid. Here is the link to Dr. Pashman's measurements on my back.

    http://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php...type=1&theater

    Pilar
    Scoliosis Diagnosed at age 12. Wore Milwaukee brace for 2 years.
    Now age 32
    Pre-op curves: C86-T98-L37
    Surgery date: 12/6/2010 (anterior) 12/10/2010 (posterior)
    Fused T2 to L5 with thoracoplasty.
    Post-op curves: C48-T47-L17
    Dr. Robert Pashman
    Cedars Sinai, Los Angeles, CA
    Before and after xrays :
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...5&d=1292969215

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    8,903
    Quote Originally Posted by pilar View Post
    Janet,
    Yes, my rib hump was measured and pre-op was 75 degrees, post-op is 37. I understand the logic of fusing and swelling, but I still se a bit more rib hump in my back now at almost 5 month post-op than 2 month post op. I am most def going to ask about this to Dr. Pashman at my 6 month visit. I'm might just be gaining weght or being paranoid. Here is the link to Dr. Pashman's measurements on my back.

    http://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php...type=1&theater

    Pilar
    That 75* is for your kyphosis which is a SPINE hump in the middle of the back.

    What folks are talking about in this thread as far as I can tell is an ASYMMETRICAL rib hump, usually on the right side due to rotation.

    That said, with a 98* main curve, you must have had some significant rotation, much of which was removed but some remains based on the sagittal post op radiograph.
    Last edited by Pooka1; 05-01-2011 at 10:50 AM.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    1,250
    Yes, Pooka, that's what I was referring to. Yes, I had a lot of rotation. Thanks for the info. Janet
    Janet

    61 years old--57 for surgery

    Diagnosed in 1965 at age of 13--no brace
    Thoracic Curve: 96 degrees to 35 degrees
    Lumbar Curve: 63 degrees to 5 degrees
    Surgery with Dr. Lenke in St. Louis--March 30, 2009
    T-2 to Pelvis, and hopefully all posterior procedure.

    All was posterior along with 2 cages and 6 osteotomies.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    1,250
    I now realize you were referring to Pilar who started with the 98. I wasn't far behind her at 96 so mine may not be so bad. As long as it doesn't progress more!
    Janet

    61 years old--57 for surgery

    Diagnosed in 1965 at age of 13--no brace
    Thoracic Curve: 96 degrees to 35 degrees
    Lumbar Curve: 63 degrees to 5 degrees
    Surgery with Dr. Lenke in St. Louis--March 30, 2009
    T-2 to Pelvis, and hopefully all posterior procedure.

    All was posterior along with 2 cages and 6 osteotomies.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    8,903
    Yes I was commenting on Pilar's post. I guess kyphosis produces a hump also but it is not a rib hump... it is a spine hump.

    Rib hump is pretty specific for the one-sided hump from the ribs protruding due to the rotation accompanying high-angle scoliosis (except in the hysterical cases).
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    672
    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    That explanation makes absolutely no sense to me. Do you think the surgeon was saying that now that the rotation and curvature had been corrected, the ribs were now able to form properly?
    No, that's not what I was saying at all. Sorry if you misunderstood or I didn't explain correctly, sometimes my thoughts don't transpose into type the way I mean to, especially if I'm in a rush.

    During growth, the progressive curvature, rotation and asymetrical muscle force may cause the ribs to malform/become misshapen.
    Once ribs are formed, they're formed. With surgical correction of curvature and rotation, it seems that most patients get satisfactory correction of the rib hump, even if there may be some slight malformation of the ribs. Not often, the ribs may malform to such a degree that even with good curvature/rotation correction a rib hump may still be quite measureable. My older son's curve correction is still holding 5 yrs. later at approx. 17T/10L, yet his rib hump still measures at approx. 18. Reasons: spine not as flexible as hoped and ribs were malformed. At younger son's appt. yesterday, curve is not even really measureable, less than 10T, and rib hump (measured with scoliometer) was 5. It remains to be seen if the rib hump measurement will change over the course of the year. There is still a little unevenness in the hips, but dr. feels that may still straighten itself out as the skeletal frame adjusts to its new position.

    I hope I'm not coming across as negative or hysterical. Patients/decision makers should consider all angles of post surgery outcomes and maybe this will help someone in asking questions during their consultations - there is so much to consider it can make your head spin.

    Linda, if you feel this is still unclear or incorrect info, feel free to delete it. I don't want to misinform or mislead anyone.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    6,797
    Quote Originally Posted by flowerpower View Post
    No, that's not what I was saying at all. Sorry if you misunderstood or I didn't explain correctly, sometimes my thoughts don't transpose into type the way I mean to, especially if I'm in a rush.

    During growth, the progressive curvature, rotation and asymetrical muscle force may cause the ribs to malform/become misshapen.
    Once ribs are formed, they're formed. With surgical correction of curvature and rotation, it seems that most patients get satisfactory correction of the rib hump, even if there may be some slight malformation of the ribs. Not often, the ribs may malform to such a degree that even with good curvature/rotation correction a rib hump may still be quite measureable. My older son's curve correction is still holding 5 yrs. later at approx. 17T/10L, yet his rib hump still measures at approx. 18. Reasons: spine not as flexible as hoped and ribs were malformed. At younger son's appt. yesterday, curve is not even really measureable, less than 10T, and rib hump (measured with scoliometer) was 5. It remains to be seen if the rib hump measurement will change over the course of the year. There is still a little unevenness in the hips, but dr. feels that may still straighten itself out as the skeletal frame adjusts to its new position.

    I hope I'm not coming across as negative or hysterical. Patients/decision makers should consider all angles of post surgery outcomes and maybe this will help someone in asking questions during their consultations - there is so much to consider it can make your head spin.

    Linda, if you feel this is still unclear or incorrect info, feel free to delete it. I don't want to misinform or mislead anyone.
    Sorry, I am still confused. The issue is increase in rib hump after spinal fusion, but it sounds like you're describing the malformation prior to surgery.
    Never argue with an idiot. They always drag you down to their level, and then they beat you with experience. --Dilbert
    I'm sarcastic... what's your super power? --Unknown
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Surgery 2/10/93 A/P fusion T4-L3
    Surgery 1/20/11 A/P fusion L2-sacrum w/pelvic fixation
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If you've signed up and are having trouble posting, please check your spam folder. An email was sent to the email address which you subscribed. You have to follow the instructions in that email. Done that and still having trouble posting? Contact Joe O'Brien at jpobrien@scoliosis.org.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    672
    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    Sorry, I am still confused. The issue is increase in rib hump after spinal fusion, but it sounds like you're describing the malformation prior to surgery.
    I was, as a reason that a rib hump might "reappear" post surgery once swelling has gone down, body settles, etc.

    Are you talking about an increase in rib hump beyond pre-surgery measurement after fusion has taken place???

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by LindaRacine View Post
    While osteopenia and osteoporosis can cause kyphosis and/or scoliosis, they don't always.

    --Linda
    True, but for those of us that have kyphosis and, or, rib humps, bones that are soft are prone to bend with our curves. We can do something about this by being aggressive in our treatment of our osteopenia and osteoporosis. I have started working with a specialist.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •