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Thread: TornadoSuit developed by Dr. Mark Morningstar

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    1,164
    Here's a slightly-to-the-left-of-the-topic question. I've considered doing some kind of bracing with my son that wasn't all day, but just wearing a brace for maybe an hour a day - long enough to get the feel of the posture - and then taking it off again and trying to hold the posture.

    Could you somehow train you muscles in that way? By slowly learning the way the brace is holding your curve and learning to mimic it? Or are the things the brace does simply not possible for muscles to ever accomplish?

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    Your best bet would be Schroth and Cheneau bracing combined. The idea is that you do the Schroth exercises both in the brace and out. And when you're in the brace there is still room to actively move away from the pressure points. For kids the bracing is the primary treatment and Schroth complements it. In adults, it's the other way around -- the bracing complements the Schroth.

    (thanks for reposting the link!)
    1993, Age 13, 53* Right T Curve w/ Left L compensatory
    2010, Age 30, 63* or 68* (depending on the doc) Right T Curve w/ Left L compensatory

    http://livingtwisted.wordpress.com/

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,164
    I think his curve is too high for that brace, and the only time when he would have tolerated a Milwaukee brace would have been when he was fighting his rapid progression. I wondered if something like this would be configurable enough for a high curve like his.

    More of a passing thought - he's almost graduated, and not in pain. He's probably out of the thinking-about-treatments phase for the next 5 to 10 years. But I do want to have a good arsenal of things ready if he should need them.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    Do you mean the apex is high up on his back or that the cobb angle is large? The standard cobb angle cut-offs given for kids don't really apply to adults since cobb angle becomes less of an indication for surgery in adults. It's not that the braces aren't made for larger curves. But I don't know much about what happens when there's a cervical curve.
    1993, Age 13, 53* Right T Curve w/ Left L compensatory
    2010, Age 30, 63* or 68* (depending on the doc) Right T Curve w/ Left L compensatory

    http://livingtwisted.wordpress.com/

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,164
    I mean it's up high. It's not cervical, but it starts at T2, and that's considered too high for most conventional braces. It's termed a high thoracic curve, instead of just a thoracic curve.

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