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Thread: Let's play "name that curve"!

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by green m&m View Post
    That shadow is just the space between the lungs
    Ahhh, I was wondering what that was, too! Thanks for that.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmc View Post
    The surgeon/spine specialist didn't give me any reports, I asked him about the angles and type of curve and he managed to wriggle out of an answer. Maybe I could contact a nurse or assistant there and see if they can send me what they have.
    The surgeon will never give you any reports unless you request them, usually from their staff, like the person at the front desk. And it's not necessarily a report, it's simply a copy of the chart with the degrees listed on it by date of visit, although that varies by surgeon. It usually costs a little bit of money to get copies made. If you called and asked some questions, they probably would just tell you the angle(s) over the phone, and yes that call would be directed to the person who answered the phone, not the surgeon himself. They are usually quite helpful.

    I have never been given any specific information about curve type either. I searched around though and it looks like my daughter has a "false double-major curve" with a structural thoracic curve and a compensatory lumbar curve. Apparently a side-bending film is required to determine that, but since your lumbar curve appears to be less than 25 degrees without bending, it's sure to be less than 25 degrees on bending. So basically whether you have a false double major curve would depend on whether or not you have kyphosis greater than 20 degrees from T10-L2. If you do, then the lumbar curve would be considered structural and your curve would be considered a true double major curve. I suppose all this could change if curves progress at some point.

    Anyhow, here's one of the great resources I found if you want to read further about it. The information starts on page 68 at "Coronal Balance in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis". I suppose this might even be different if you had some other type of scoliosis other than AIS....but it's a start anyway. Remember that this is NOT professional medical advice and could possibly be incorrect.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=cZu...22C%22&f=false

  3. #18
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    Many thanks, Ballet Mom, I appreciate all of the information.

    When I got my X-Rays, it was in the form of a CD, but they told me that it would be without a report. Unfortunately it wasn't Mac compatible, so I had to find a PC to view the files. But, that wouldn't work because one has to be online..... so, of all places for me to see my X-Rays for the first time- a pizza joint with Wi-Fi. Not my ideal place, it was a little surreal to say the least.

    It wasn't until about a month later could I see the spine specialist again, but he didn't seem to have any numerical data to share at that point. I'll call them, thanks!

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmc View Post
    When I got my X-Rays, it was in the form of a CD, but they told me that it would be without a report.
    Have you checked whether there is a short (few sentence) write-up on CD?

    There is a short radiologist (not surgeon) report with each radiograph on both CDs for my daughters. It states the angles and whether there was a change from the previous one. Sometimes there is a stray comment about soft tissue or something besides spine also. They are only a few sentences but every radiograph has an accompanying write-up.

    It was eye-opening to see those little reports because clearly the surgeon was not using them and did his own measurements and made different conclusions about progression or non-progression.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  5. #20
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    That's interesting that there are surgeons that use radiologists for their scoliosis x-rays. We've been to three different surgeons' offices and they all have an x-ray room right next to all the exam rooms. No radiologist involved.

  6. #21
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    It's probably more common in a hospital setting. Our surgeon at OHSU sent us downstairs for an xray (no machines in his office) so we got both the radiologist's and the doctor's reading. Oddly, those two readings were miles apart - our surgeon read the curve as 57 and the radiologist read it as 45.

  7. #22
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    One of those surgeons was based in a hospital and he had an x-ray room right next to the exam rooms. He would come back to the computer next to the x-ray curtain and look at the x-rays as they were available. No radiologist involved. In fact, it seems like a waste of money to have a radiologist involved in the process. Maybe that's because there isn't the quantity of orthopedic patients necessary to make it cost-effective. Nevertheless, it seems very "union-like" to have to have a radiologist read the x-ray prior to the orthopedic surgeon.
    Last edited by Ballet Mom; 01-29-2011 at 04:26 PM.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdugger View Post
    It's probably more common in a hospital setting. Our surgeon at OHSU sent us downstairs for an xray (no machines in his office) so we got both the radiologist's and the doctor's reading. Oddly, those two readings were miles apart - our surgeon read the curve as 57 and the radiologist read it as 45.
    To read these radiologist reports after the fact and after what I had as my kids' progression history from the surgeon was very eye opening. What I wrote contemporaneous with these surgeon visits (and therefore was fresh in my head) is quite different from the radiologist reports. An unbiased observer would never conclude they were for the same patient. It's that divergent in my opinion.

    It is very clear there are schools of thought w.r.t. how to measure these things. The bottom line is stick with any one school and don't mix schools.

    What is not clear is why the insurance pays for the radiologist readings when they must realize the surgeon is measuring these things himself. I have seen the surgeon measuring radiographs prior to him coming in with the radiographs.
    Last edited by Pooka1; 01-29-2011 at 05:48 PM.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

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