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Thread: non-surgical treatments

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1

    Question non-surgical treatments

    I am tryin to look up non-surgical treatments for my daughter who has a lumbar curve of 22 degrees. She is complaining of a lot of sharp pain on her whole left side.She had an MRI which was negative. The orthopedic surgeon does not know why she has so much pain. She has been going to a chiropractor for the last 13 months which was helping for the 12 months, but lately she seems to get relief for a for a day or two only. I don't know if it is because of these treatments, her curve has been maintained. She has to have another set of x-rays soon. By reading other members comments, I can see pilates, yoga and exercises to be helpful. I am going to look into this. I have read that Network Spinal Analysis helps scoliosis patients. Also Bowen Technique and Raindrop Therapy helps. I am wondering if anyone has any knowledge about this therapies?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Lake of the Ozarks, MO
    Posts
    2

    Massage & phys therapy

    I seldom have sharp pain - but my left side is always pulling and causing constant pain - I call it my "mean" spot. The chiro seldom gets this area to adjust and when it gets really bad I have spams in my front left rib cage. When I went to a Orth for my shoulder a couple yrs ago - he had me in physical therapy. The stretching and massage they did really helped calm this area down. Also a good deep tissue massage often helps. And the hot tub at night? Good luck - hope your daughter is doing ok Linda

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    8
    Hello Nashi,
    In my opinion a combination of approaches is a good idea when working with scoliosis. I study Alexander Technique as a way to improve my proprioceptive sense and overall coordination.

    I have developed an exercise routine which I do a few times a week to keep my muscles supple. It is based in some of the principles and exercises of Pilates and Feldenkrais.

    I get massaged once every two weeks to also help keep my body from getting too rigid in its response to the curve. In January I plan to begin seeing a Rolfer. I've heard mixed responses to Rolfing, but the practitioner I'll be going to seems very competent.

    Take care
    Joshua
    www.moving-living.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    5
    My daughter goes to a chiro that practices spinal biomechanice. She has very little pain and her curves are much worse then your daughters. Email me if you would like to know more about it! Bonnie9557@aol.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1
    I have had scoliosis for 11yrs. I have tried everything and the only thing that I have found to totaly get rid of all my pain is acupuncture. If anyone has any questions about it feel free to email me at sparky69ga@yahoo.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Maine & Georgia
    Posts
    3

    Yoga for scolosis

    Yoga, and to some extent Alexander technique, are the best way for a patient to learn to manage the disease themselves over time. All others, massage, acupuncture, chiropractic, are very helpful in conjunction, but yoga really trains your mind-body how to keep itself free of pain. Unfortunately, it takes a lot of practice, every day, and the results show over time. Having a form of scoliosis which causes pain means that you really have to spend time on it. Much love and best wishes, EK
    Ellen Koehler Kiley
    Jivamukti Certified Yoga Instructor
    Specializing in Scoliosis

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    2
    Structural Integration often helps both adults and children with Scoliosis.

    Here is a link to an article on children and scoliosisScoliosis article reprint

    The guy in the article - David Davis of the Guild for Structural Integration in Boulder, CO - specializes in Scoliosis, both kids and adults and gives workshops all over the country. His wife has it. I have attended one of his workshops and communicate with him when I work with children or adults with Scoliosis. My youngest was 7 and my oldest was 64. All have been helped in varying degrees. I work with my sister, too, regularly who got more and more compressed over the years until she discovered Structural Integration. She is 62 and reports that she moves better, has less pain, and her breathing is much freer.

    Structural Integration is also known as Rolfing which used to have a poor reputation for being somewhat painful. Over the years that has changed a lot and more gentle techniques are being used. Sometimes the work can resemble very gentle Craniosacral work. My 7 year old told his mother how much he liked Rolfing. He would come every time, remove his shirt and jump on the table. We always made it a little game. His before and after pictures are quite amazing. How much work he will have to continue to have over the next several years is unknown at this time - sure beats surgery or a brace.

    If you go for Rolfing and find it painful at the first session, then get another practitioner. It doesn't have to hurt to help. Let me know if I can be of further assistance. I can help you find you a gentle practitioner.
    Carol Orrell, MS, LMT
    Manual Therapy Solutions - offering Rolfing, Structural Integration, Craniosacral therapy and more

  8. #8
    scoliosisguy Guest

    acupuncture?

    Never tried it yet myself,but I am thinking of trying it in near future

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    12
    I'm 16 with about a 50 degree curve and I haven't gotten any severe pain yet...(but not gonna speak too soon =\...) but I do get quite tense and sore in my back. Her pain could be related to stress or something of that nature. I would say that you are right with the yoga and pilates to help keep the muscles supple like someone mentioned, and also to relax her. I do Feldenkrais an hour each day which helps alot to relieve pressure and soreness in my back.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    12

    non surgical scoliosis curve reduction

    Quote Originally Posted by q_fruit
    I'm 16 with about a 50 degree curve and I haven't gotten any severe pain yet...(but not gonna speak too soon =\...) but I do get quite tense and sore in my back. Her pain could be related to stress or something of that nature. I would say that you are right with the yoga and pilates to help keep the muscles supple like someone mentioned, and also to relax her. I do Feldenkrais an hour each day which helps alot to relieve pressure and soreness in my back.
    All are great things to do but do not do much to stop the progression of the curve. Check out this download, these guys are getting unbelievable results... http://www.clear-institute.com/downloads.php

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