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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    1,258

    Hr 4872

    Ok then - the health care bill has passed and been signed into law. Now what?

    I had no idea just how many people in the US were without insurance - 83%

    Here's a good "overview" http://www.healthwikisource.com/

    And the full text: http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c111:H.R.4872:

    Looks like insurance companies will no longer be able to deny claims based on pre-existing conditions (excellent). Some Medicare reform down the road, companies with 50 employees or more will be required to provide insurance, and parents will be able to keep their kids on their family policies until they reach age 26.

    Looks like a very complex thing. Was wondering how the changes may effect our future health care choices. Will it be easier or harder to say: to have insurance cover Schroth in WI - or an out of network surgeon?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamamax View Post
    Looks like a very complex thing. Was wondering how the changes may effect our future health care choices. Will it be easier or harder to say: to have insurance cover Schroth in WI - or an out of network surgeon?
    Linda has mentioned a few times that coverage is heading towards evidence based choices. If that was in relation to this bill then I think bracing and PT are on chopping block.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  3. #3
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    i do believe that the percentage is around 15%..it is defintiely not 83%!! the number quoted is usually 44 million..that doesnt come out to 83% of America!!

    if you check the internet for a percentage, it most often says that 15% of Americans are without health insurance at this time...

    jess

  4. #4
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    If there are 300 plus million people, how can 32 million be 83%?

    Where do these numbers come from?
    Ed
    49 yr old male, now 59, the new 55...
    Pre surgery curves C12,T70,L70
    ALIF/PLIF T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
    Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

    Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

    My x-rays
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

  5. #5
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    May 2008
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    reno,nevada
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    Nevermind. This is not a govt website.

    It sure looked like it.
    Ed
    49 yr old male, now 59, the new 55...
    Pre surgery curves C12,T70,L70
    ALIF/PLIF T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
    Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

    Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

    My x-rays
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

  6. #6
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    May 2008
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    Mamamax

    We still have to wait this out.......

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36012201...ashington_post

    Ed
    49 yr old male, now 59, the new 55...
    Pre surgery curves C12,T70,L70
    ALIF/PLIF T2-Pelvis 01/29/08, 01/31/08 7" pelvic anchors BMP
    Dr Brett Menmuir St Marys Hospital Reno,Nevada

    Bending and twisting pics after full fusion
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showt...on.&highlight=

    My x-rays
    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...2&d=1228779214

    http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/attac...3&d=1228779258

  7. #7
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    i think it will take time to se how it goes...it is nerve wracking...a little bit i think...cause who knows what it will cause to happen...my sister lives in montreal & she has "free medical care" but said the taxes are really high up there!
    i hope it works out well & brings needed insurance to those who lack it...just hope it doesnt mean loooong lines at the doctor's office & treatments denied from insurance companies! am sure they will find a new way to deny people! they are so good at that!!

    jess

  8. #8
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    Oct 2005
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    Chicago north suburb
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    Was wondering how the changes may effect our future health care choices.
    What choices? Over 30,000,000 more insured plus critical doctor shortage (with more threatening to leave the profession with passage of this bill) equals rationed care. And donít forget taxes, taxes and more taxes. Welcome to western Europe.

  9. #9
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    NJ
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    Exclamation No system is perfect but we need a safety net.

    My brother-in-law developed cancer in his 50s. Couldn't work because of chemo, lost insurance, lost everything to medical bankruptcy. In Western Europe, where have family with medical problems, no-one worries about medical bankruptcy. Some have chosen to buy a supplement for private care(Germany/Switzerland) for say, a private room. At least they do not worry about losing everything.

    I see smugness in those with excellent insurance, paid for by employer--just get sick and not be able to work and/ or have your spouse get sick at the same time. Your insurer would never cover you if you do not work. We have lost employer coverage in retirement. We thought we were immune. You would be glad to have a safety net under you.

    I personally would prefer higher taxes with lower premiums(they are limited under the new law-phased in over time) and never have to experience what my brother-in-law has.
    Last edited by Karen Ocker; 03-24-2010 at 02:25 PM.
    Original scoliosis surgery 1956 T-4 to L-2 ~100 degree thoracic (triple)curves at age 14. NO hardware-lost correction.
    Anterior/posterior revision T-4 to Sacrum in 2002, age 60, by Dr. Boachie-Adjei @Hospital for Special Surgery, NY = 50% correction

  10. #10
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    NC
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    Scandinavian countries regularly rank as having the best standard of living in the world. They have high taxes and lots of safety nets and score near or at the top on science knowledge.

    The proof is in the pudding... compare living standards.
    Sharon, mother of identical twin girls with scoliosis

    No island of sanity.

    Question: What do you call alternative medicine that works?
    Answer: Medicine


    "We are all African."

  11. #11
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    Oct 2005
    Location
    Chicago north suburb
    Posts
    774
    No comparison. Scandinavian countries combined have only one-fifteenth of the U.S. population.

    Bottom line is this thing will most likely bankrupt our country. For sure something had to be done to address problems, but a government takeover based on backroom deals by a bunch of crooks was not the answer.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    There will likely be more gatekeeping for services. People who are not "vigorous" are more likely to have certain procedures denied. Vigorous is the word my mother's doctor used when he was trying to convey to my mother that something like hip replacement surgery wouldn't necessarily be denied to her under the new system because of her age. Rather if it was someone her age who also had, for example, cancer or cirrhosis and therefore who "based on evidence" or statistics doesn't have a great chance of a long remaining life who might be denied a hip replacement (or spinal fusion). Just an example.

    Or some of those premie babies who statistically do not have a good shot of surviving...the parents may lose the choice of whether expensive measures can be taken (unless they have a trust fund).

    I find the uncertainty of it kind of scary - who and how will these decisions be made? What decisions will be made?

    Our insurance coverage runs from mid year to mid year so we'll probably find out before most people how premiums will be impacted. I know they will go up substantially (they're already pretty high), but that's almost the least of it (even though it is important also)...I'm more concerned about access to services in the future. I guess it will play out over the next year or so...

    I wonder how quickly before the med school enrollment goes down and the more highly qualified students decide to pursue other careers?
    daughter, 12, diagnosed 8/07 with 19T/13L
    -Braced in spinecor 10/07 - 8/12 with excellent in brace correction and stable/slightly decreased out of brace curves.
    -Introduced Providence brace as adjunct at night in 11/2011 in anticipation of growth spurt. Curves still stable.
    -Currently in Boston Brace. Growth spurt is here and curves (and rotation) have increased to 23T/17L

  13. #13
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    Mar 2009
    Location
    Central VA
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    I was wondering also how the new health plan would affect our scoliosis options... thanks for this discussion. Some tiny part of me wants to keep surgery as an option! Covered!

  14. #14
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    ny
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamamax View Post
    Some Medicare reform down the road, companies with 50 employees or more will be required to provide insurance, and parents will be able to keep their kids on their family policies until they reach age 26.
    I just wanted to say that many insurers currently allow one's children to remain on their policies through college. My husband and I have, at various times, covered our kids on our respective health plans (one policy allows it until age 25, the other until age 26, provided they are full-time students). So this is not completely new.

    For the record, I am not against everything in this bill, just hoping that, among other things, we don't end up with very long waiting times like many other countries. And unfortunately, since it's a very real possibility that fewer people will choose to become doctors, that's not an unrealistic concern by any stretch. But I am all for doing away with the pre-existing conditions loophole for insurers and other aspects of the bill.

    I'm just still quite skeptical.
    mariaf305@yahoo.com
    Mom to David, age 17, braced June 2000 to March 2004
    Vertebral Body Stapling 3/10/04 for 40 degree curve (currently mid 20's)

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/ScoliosisTethering/

    http://pediatricspinefoundation.org/

  15. #15
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    Aug 2007
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    Maria, I can't see how we won't end up with very long waiting times - supply and demand...after all the demand will be going up - this is good since it will be because people who might not have had as much health care due to a lack of insurance will finally have access to health care. That alone should make wait time longer, but at least we know its for a good reason. On the other hand, it seems likely that the number of doctors will go down...probably drastically when the pipeline of future doctors from med school and residency programs fall as a result of this program (not to mention any early retirements). If this is the case, there will be a very large gap between supply and demand and wait times will have to go up. Hopefully the wait times won't go up so much that people miss the window of opportunity for services. God forbid because somebody has to wait for an appointment, diagnosis of something like cancer is delayed until it is too late to treat (in which case treatment might be denied since statistics will show they have a low chance of surviving - hey, but at least that will help control the cost of the program, right? OK, I admit, that last part is a curmudgeon's remark- but the skeptic in me had to say it)

    I hope the program works as intended, I am just very afraid to leave something like this up to our government. Weren't they fighting over whether Viagra should be paid for for convicted child molesters and rapists? Come on, lets give the country health care, but I don't want to subsidize that! (by the way, did that coverage remain in the bill or was it eliminated? hopefully the latter)
    Last edited by jillw; 03-26-2010 at 10:44 PM. Reason: typo typo typo!
    daughter, 12, diagnosed 8/07 with 19T/13L
    -Braced in spinecor 10/07 - 8/12 with excellent in brace correction and stable/slightly decreased out of brace curves.
    -Introduced Providence brace as adjunct at night in 11/2011 in anticipation of growth spurt. Curves still stable.
    -Currently in Boston Brace. Growth spurt is here and curves (and rotation) have increased to 23T/17L

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