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theizzard
12-19-2009, 05:26 AM
Anyone in scoli surgery land have any experience with the Pilates Reformer machine? I had wanted to try it for a long time and finally found a place that has the machines and I was able to take a free class yesterday. So far it feels ok. It certainly felt safe enough and I didn't wake up with mad pain so I am thinking of signing up for a month to see how things go. So I am curious if anyone has any experience negative or positive with the reformer. I did mat pilates for several years but since my latest surgery, I have been afraid to go back. The reformer seemed like a much safer way to approach the exercises.
any and all comments will be appreciated.
avis:D:D

jesscv
12-21-2009, 12:53 PM
I've been doing mat pilates for 2 years (was fused T2-L1 this spring) and started doing work on the Reformer at six months post-op. I love it! I am actually in the process of becoming a certified pilates instructor right now....and while there are obviously certain exercises I can't do, I feel I can do most. Actually, just simply getting myself off of the Reformer is the hardest movement of all. ;) Pilates is amazing for recovering from back surgery and helping you regain strength & mobility.

lapieper
12-21-2009, 04:01 PM
I have a Pilates Reformer and loved doing it prior to my surgery. I have dabbled in it, but have held off due to my current situation. Once I have this, hopefully, last surgery I plan on hitting it once again. I absolutely love the toning and relaxing move of this machine!
Les

dolores a
12-21-2009, 06:12 PM
Hi Avis, I also tried pilates before surgery and loved it, unfortunately is was too expensive for me to keep going. I purchased the Susan Luci pilates machine from one of those infomercials, while it is not anywhere near the actual machine, I got a lot of use out of it, soon I will dust it off and get back on it. From what I researched, pilates was created for wounded soldiers as a low impact type of therapy. The theory makes sense to me, you get a lot out of it with having to jump all around the place!

Doodles
12-21-2009, 09:33 PM
Could you explain this machine a bit more? I know my gym has one but you have to work with a trainer and it's a separate $60 fee each time so I didn't even try it before surgery. I did a pilates/yoga class before surgery but can't imagine being able to do any of that now or ever actually. Since I'm to the pelvis would that make the difference? I'm back to the gym doing lots of stuff but I haven't returned to any classes yet--pilates or otherwise. Getting down for floor exercises would be over before I got down there. Plus, I tried it and I feel like I'm lying on a a long heap of metal--guess I am. Janet

theizzard
12-22-2009, 06:56 AM
Thanks for the replies. I have tried it twice now and think I will keep going. Yesterday was a hard workout and I am sore today so I will take today off. I had never used one before so I was nervous about it. It sounds like those who have used it like it.
Doodles, I can't get up off the floor which is why I wanted to try the reformer. It's just like rolling off of a bed (sort of) which is a hell of a lot easier than the floor. The place that I found is so reasonable price wise that I couldn't help but try it. If it was $60 a session forget about it. I found it by accident and it's only about half an hour from home. I wanted to say that the bed is not all metal but it's padded like a workout bench and not uncomfortable. Yesterday I did exercises on it that I used to do on the mat. The machine provides safety for the back or at least that is how it seems to me.
avis

jesscv
12-22-2009, 11:58 AM
the Pilates reformer is a sophisticated system of springs, straps and pulleys - and more than 100 exercises can be performed on this machine. it helps you establish core/torso stability, flexibility & proper postural alignment while working your limbs in a range of motion. the adjustable springs allow for progressive resistance, which helps to lengthen and strengthen the muscles. what i love best about the reformer is it makes for an effective, no-impact stretching and toning workout that is extremely friendly to the joints and spine! and the effects go deep with Pilates - i've engaged muscles i never knew i had. in fact, i experienced significant shoulder girdle and rotator cuff weakness post-surgery, and i cannot even tell you how much Pilates has helped me to rebuild my strength. in addition to the reformer, i also love the Pilates Cadillac and chair. Pilates IS expensive, but in my opinion totally worth it. also, some studios/rec centers are cheaper than others. you need to look around. i actually prefer to go to a physical therapy clinic that offers Pilates classes - the instructors seem to have a lot more knowledge of the spine and/or experience working with fusion patients....give it a try!

Doodles
12-22-2009, 08:26 PM
Thanks for the info. I definitely need to look into this. Janet

debbei
12-23-2009, 08:11 AM
Anyone in scoli surgery land have any experience with the Pilates Reformer machine? I had wanted to try it for a long time and finally found a place that has the machines and I was able to take a free class yesterday. So far it feels ok. It certainly felt safe enough and I didn't wake up with mad pain so I am thinking of signing up for a month to see how things go. So I am curious if anyone has any experience negative or positive with the reformer. I did mat pilates for several years but since my latest surgery, I have been afraid to go back. The reformer seemed like a much safer way to approach the exercises.
any and all comments will be appreciated.
avis:D:D

Hi Avis,
I haven't but it sounds like a great idea. If you try it, let me know how it goes. How is your 'bowling ball' pain lately? Has it improved? My similar upper back spasms 'mysteriously' disappeared overnight when my gigantic work super stressful project ended. I really wish I could control the stress and not have it go to my back.

Have a good Christmas!

Karen Ocker
12-26-2009, 03:59 PM
I have been doing Pilates before and after my revision surgery 7 years ago.

I stress: do not try it on your own.

Learn from a certified Pilates instructor. Once you learn how to use it, after movement modifications based on one's physical conditions, you can then do it on your own.

Pilates is not supposed to result in significant pain. Then you are doing something wrong.

joyfull
12-26-2009, 08:43 PM
Hi all. This discussion is fascinating to me. Pilates sound so beneficial that I believe that if I had done this instead of going to Clear Institute in 2007, I would have been in much better shape now. The Clear Institute method practically ignored the torso muscles and I was alarmed to feel those muscles giving way so that my back became flatter as my spine moved way over to the right side.

So does anyone know a good instructor in New Jersey, or how to find one. I found a book on the internet called "Pilates for Fragile Backs" by Andra Stanton, forward by Dr. Boachie-Adjei, but I would feel more confident with an instructor.

Joy

Karen Ocker
12-29-2009, 04:18 PM
http://www.pilates.com/