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bcputnam
09-05-2009, 11:01 AM
All- I have been reading with interest all the great posts out there from some wonderful parents who are well in along in the fight that I am just starting with my son. Eric is 13 with 13 degree thoracic and 13 degree compensating lumbar curve. He is 5'5" and just hitting puberty Risser 0. I know that gender is on my side here, but of course got what I expected in our first consult with the ortho doc (Emory Spine doc)...wait and see...7 mos come back for another xray. Then KEEP watching IF or when it progresses. I want to start some type of PT for the assymetry in core muscles (read the '03 article in Orthopaedics) and I will most likely start some melatonin (thanks Dingo). Eric was also a night light kid. The doc reluctantly gave me a script for PT. Luckily my husband is a personal trainer, so if we can "learn" some of the right things to do it may not be too onerous for Eric to do them. Right now he just wants to ignore the whole thing. He is a very active and talented baseball and football player and is "stunned" about the betrayal he feels his body has dealt him. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.
:confused:

hdugger
09-05-2009, 02:59 PM
Dingo also recommends the torso rotation with a torso rotation machine. I don't have the link handy, but if you google "scoliosis torso rotation" you should find it.

If I'd found out about my son's scoliosis when he was a bit younger (he was almost 17 by the time is was diagnosed) I would have looked into exercises/PT instead of just watching and waiting. The people associated with the SEAS exercises in Italy have seen very good results in young people, and they have a good comprehensive sense about when to do exercise, when to do bracing, and when to go to surgery.

The general recommendations I hear are keeping the core muscles strong, stretching the convex side, and strengthening the concave side (or, I think that's right). The side that has the spine curving into it is too tight, and the side that has the spine curving away from it is overstretched and weak.

Our PT person strongly recommends swimming, because it does crosswise exercise - you move the arm and the leg on the other side at the same time. He also recommends non-throwing martial arts, like some forms of kung fu and all of tai chi.

We also felt that deep, theraputic massage was very helpful. We went to someone who has special training in working with injuries and she was able to put my son's neck and shoulder blades in a better position.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 03:38 PM
Dingo also recommends

It is important to note Dingo is a concerned but lay parent with no training in medicine or clinical study design or anything relevant to this subject.

He recommends it based on his lay reading of the literature and not on any recommendation from an experienced pediatric scoliosis surgeon.

PT might work but it hasn't yet been shown in controlled studies.

When you say someone recommends something and that someone has no formal training, it is misleading. You have to qualify these comments because the person may assume these recommendations are based on something scientific.

betty14
09-05-2009, 04:36 PM
Hi there:

Since you mentioned doing a PT approach, and I since I am a PT who also has scoliosis....I'd like to recommend that you do the most specific PT approach to manage scoliosis, which is the Schroth approach. A PT who is not trained in scoliosis care, or is not naturally extremely imaginative, would be unlikely to be able to provide effective PT for spinal deformity.

You can check out photos on a thread posted by MissEmmyF for examples of how the exercises might look. There is plenty of research out there to support the benefits of a scoliosis-specific exercise approach - of course, there is no cure for scoliosis - the goal is to minimize the postural collape and altered postural self-awareness that comes with the bony deformity, as well as to manage pain).

I recently travelled 6 hours away for a week of holidays and three days of therapy, and am so glad I went (the 7 hours of PT cost about $450, which my health benefits cover, and the rest was my summer vacation) Feel free to PM me for info; I plan to post about my Schroth experience soon, but at present, time is a bit tight...


Cheers, B.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 04:52 PM
There is plenty of research out there to support the benefits of a scoliosis-specific exercise approach - of course, there is no cure for scoliosis - the goal is to minimize the postural collapse and altered postural self-awareness that comes with the bony deformity, as well as to manage pain).

Yes there are benefits like pain relief from PT for scoliosis patients but the OP seems to be asking (correct me if I'm wrong) about PT as it relates to slowing, permanently stopping or perhaps permanently reversing curves in Risser = O, 13 y.o. spine.

What benefits of PT have been demonstrated in that case?

Hopefully, PT can be shown to be efficacious in halting curve progression in kids and especially in avoiding bracing but people who "know" that need to show it in controlled studies I would think.

bcputnam
09-05-2009, 05:17 PM
Thanks to all for replies so far. I am going into this with a healthy sense of inquiry and I hope the appropriate amount of urgency. I have spent 30 years working in healthcare in some form or fashion and the genuine quest for answers comes from those who appropriately question the status quo. I have purchased a book on the Schroth method and have been considering swimming lessons for Eric. I will be looking into alternate PT methods in our local area to see what is what.:)

hdugger
09-05-2009, 05:23 PM
I think that overstates the strength of science in the medical field. Almost none of the studies I see are what I would call "good science." They're mostly anecdotal (single surgeries) or restrospective with lots of uncontrolled factors and lots of different types of patients lumped together. That's not to say that they don't strongly suggest some things, like surgery helping to keep a large curve from progressing, but there are also enormous grey-to-black areas that science has cast little light on. The best course of action for a small curve in a young teen is right in the middle of one of those black areas.

Given that we're all groping around in the dark here, lay people as well as doctors, we have to go forward with our best guesses. For a small curve, there really is no formal medical recommendation so there's no chance of leading someone astray from an established medical procedure. There are some studies that recommend bracing instead of observing, and some that recommend exercise instead of observing.

If I were a parent with a youngish teen boy, I would pick exercise, and I wish the orthopedic surgeon we first saw had made the same recommendation. Barring that, I wish I'd had someone like Dingo pouring through the research and telling me what *might* help based on the available literature. It's is extremely unlikely that it would do any harm, and there's some evidence that it might do some good. At the moment, with the current state of medical science with this particular question, that's about as good as it gets.



When you say someone recommends something and that someone has no formal training, it is misleading. You have to qualify these comments because the person may assume these recommendations are based on something scientific.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 05:57 PM
Barring that, I wish I'd had someone like Dingo pouring through the research and telling me what *might* help based on the available literature.

Yes I understand that point but his "picks" from the literature as to what might help are riddled with such obvious design and interpretation problems that he missed that it isn't rational to think at this point they even might be beneficial. See the torso rotation thread for examples of this. It is clear the studies he likes do not have data to support their conclusions.

You don't need a PhD to start to understand the literature. But you do need a sense of what is required to approach and understand the literature. And you need some humility as to how long it takes to get your arms around even a small sub-field in science or medicine. It took me a few years to get enough of a sense of the literature in my field to even propose a dissertation topic. Dingo doesn't realize or accept this fact of life. It is missing in Dingo's approach based on his comments on the literature, much of which can be expected to be false.

And I know you know what I'm referring to as this is your game. Look at the torso rotation thread... it makes my case.

I am not trying to beat up on Dingo (though he immaturely calls me names on a yahoo group). But his comments on various therapies are not supported by the literature he cites. It is okay to be hopeful but it is not okay to claim things in the literature that aren't there. He sometimes honestly reels himself and his claims in. But not most of the time. It is misleading.

hdugger
09-05-2009, 06:49 PM
I'm not sure I have the right training to determine whether people are behaving irrationally :)

Yes, the study has weakensses (as do many of the surgical studies), but it is a faint light in an area of darkness, and it does reinforce the other studies showing some benefits from exercise in young scoliosis patients with small curves. Since the medical field has nothing to offer these patients, it seems reasonable to follow these lights.


Yes I understand that point but his "picks" from the literature as to what might help are riddled with such obvious design and interpretation problems that he missed that it isn't rational to think at this point they even might be beneficial. See the torsion rotation thread for examples of this. It is clear the studies he likes do not have data to support their conclusions.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 07:03 PM
Well, as far as I know we have the folowing:

1. many smaller curves will not progress no matter what you do and don't do.

2. some smaller curves will regress and even completely resolve even doing nothing.

3. some curves are stable for months at a time and then move and then are stable for months at a time.

Given the above, if you run a study for some 4 or 8 months WITHOUT controls, how can you say anything about the efficacy of anything under study?

My one kid had a curve that progressed, was stable, progressed, was stable then progresses all on times scales of at least 6 months (the radiograph recurrence interval if you will). Both in and out of brace BTW. Her case alone and all by itself blows the Mooney study and its conclusions completely out of the water. Had she been enrolled during one of her out of brace stable periods, she would have been counted as a "success." Yet back in reality, she didn't do one single exercise. How many fake successes were counted in the Mooney study? How would anyone know given the study design? How much more damning can you get of the Mooney study? Where are the peer reviewers? Asleep at the switch?

If a study: 1) is of short duration and has no followup, 2) has no control group, and 3) makes no effort to see if the study group has different results than a "virtual" group with the same age, Risser, curve magnitude, etc. characteristics then they can't say a damn thing about the efficacy of the study treatment. Yes? No? Someone is out to lunch here. If it's me then I'd like to know where I'm jumping the tracks on this.

Thanks. :)

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 07:08 PM
but it is a faint light in an area of darkness,

If most of even the bright lights in the darkness are false, what possible hope is there that a faint light might be correct?

I mean it might be but what are the chances?

Here's what we have w.r.t. Mooney as far as I know:

1. published a few papers (of questionable conclusions IMO)(ETA: ON TORSO ROTATION. N.B. This is NOT a comment on the TOTAL number of papers he published. I thought that was clear from the context but I see not.)

2. got at least one other surgeon to do a study on torso rotation

3. that other surgeon is no longer studying torso rotation

4. he is having to fund his own work at this point. Seemingly not even SOSORT will fund him (if SOSORT funds people, I don't know).

In terms of the brightness in the darkness scale, we are approaching single photons I would say.

Just my opinion.

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 08:39 PM
Here's what we have w.r.t. Mooney as far as I know:

1. published a few papers (of questionable conclusions IMO).

2. got at least one other surgeon to do a study on torso rotation

3. that other surgeon is no longer studying torso rotation

4. he is having to fund his own work at this point. Seemingly not even SOSORT will fund him (if SOSORT funds people, I don't know).

In terms of the brightness in the darkness scale, we are approaching single photons I would say.

Just my opinion.


Here is Dr. Mooney's CV....perhaps if you look at it you might change your mind and think perhaps that he knows a little bit more about this than you do. I know it's hard to do when you already know everything...but hey...perhaps some photons can make it into your black hole.

http://www.spineandsport.com/ussp/Staff/VertMonneyCv.htm

And a lifetime achievement award, where he ranks right up there with Dr. Nachemson from Sweden....whom we all probably recognize at this point.

http://www.spineandsport.com/foundation/issls_press_release.htm

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 08:44 PM
How many papers has he published on torso rotation?

How do you explain the quality of the ones Dingo posted? You (the general you not you personally obviously) can see the problems with that study a mile away.

Do you understand what I'm talking about?

Let's not forget Linus Pauling and the Vitamin C thing. Pauling is the only person to ever win two solo Nobels AFAIK and we still have the Vitamin C thing.

Do you understand why that is possibly relevant and why it undermines your point?

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 08:45 PM
Hi BCPutnam,

I just wanted to suggest to you that if your son's curve reaches twenty degrees, I would seriously consider bracing him, changing orthopedists if necessary. You're very fortunate you caught the curve early. I don't believe exercise alone will stop the curve once a child is in their major growth spurt and it is progressing, the curves can really take off. Good luck!

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 08:47 PM
Pooka,

Don't forget that he is studying torso rotation right now, how many papers should he have published at this point? I suspect he'll be publishing a paper, once the study is complete. Sheesh...I think they were just recruiting a few months ago. Give him some time.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 08:51 PM
Pooka,

Don't forget that he is studying torso rotation right now, how many papers should he have published at this point? I suspect he'll be publishing a paper, once the study is complete. Sheesh...I think they were just recruiting a few months ago. Give him some time.

He has a study published in 2003. It might not be the first on one torso rotation. The study is riddled with design and interpretation pitfalls that compromise interpretation. Ask someone who knows about experimental design... don't take my word.

Your explanation is...

Do you understand what I wrote above? I don't think you do.

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 08:51 PM
Oh, and I don't think much about the Nobel prize, it has become politically driven more than anything else.

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 08:54 PM
I don't think any study in the real medical world could possibly come close to your standards. There's a reason they don't do the studies the way you want them done in the medical field. There are real people's lives and health at risk.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 08:54 PM
Oh, and I don't think much about the Nobel prize, it has become politically driven more than anything else.

Amazing. Truly.

You don't actually understand the point about Pauling and Vitamin C do you?

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 08:56 PM
Did you actually look at Dr. Mooney's CV and look through all his published papers? And did you notice the medical journals that he has been editor of? And you think you know more about medical studies than he does? Ridiculous.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 08:57 PM
I don't think any study in the real medical world could possibly come close to your standards. There's a reason they don't do the studies the way you want them done in the medical field. There are real people's lives and health at risk.

Well they are doing the BRAIST study. That's a decent design.

But yes, in general, the medical literature appears unique in the amount of uncontrolled studies being published. It is different than other scientific fields and that was an eye-opener for me.

But that doesn't mean you can't do a better job even with uncontrolled studies like the torso rotation paper Dingo posted.

You have to at least try.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 08:58 PM
Did you actually look at Dr. Mooney's CV and look through all his published papers? And did you notice the medical journals that he has been editor of? And you think you know more about medical studies than he does? Ridiculous.

I'm asking you to tell me how many are on torso rotation.

Your comment is PROOF that you don't understand my point in mentioning Pauling and ascorbate.

Do you understand why?

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 08:59 PM
Of course you'd think Braist was an ethical design. I can guarantee you that people, including very good orthopedists, don't agree with you...and in fact refused to participate in the Braist study because of it.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 08:59 PM
How much of this thread do you think you are following?

How much of any thread do you think you are following?

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 09:01 PM
Of course you'd think Braist was an ethical design. I can guarantee you that people, including very good orthopedists, don't agree with you...and in fact refused to participate in the Braist study because of it.

What makes you think I don't know that and why that is the case?

What you refuse to acknowledge is the REASON WHY ethicists gave them the green light.

Why not honestly acknowledge the reason?

hdugger
09-05-2009, 09:06 PM
I'm not seeing many controlled studies of any of the various methods used to treat scoliosis. That has made it frustratingly difficult to evaluate anything very precisely.

I agree that controls and a longer study time would certainly have improved this study. However, sometimes you can use the natural course of the disease as its own control. So, if "waiting and watching" has never been reported to decrease largish curves, then having 2 of 20 participants reduce their largish curves (45 and 50 degrees) to 32 degrees is a "publishable" outcome, even without built-in controls. The normal course of the disease observed over years and years *is* the control. OTOH, if it's normal for these largish curves to regress, then it would certainly be better to have built in a control group before publishing.

I thought the editorial comment on the 2003 study was a fair assessment: "The authors are to be congratulated for bringing to our attention a novel and interesting method for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, which will stimulate interest and research."

Beyond the rigors of science, if I had a younger teen with a smallish curve and all I wanted to do was to keep it from progressing before they finished growing, I'd certainly run my own study-of-one. :)



If a study: 1) is of short duration and has no followup, 2) has no control group, and 3) makes no effort to see if the study group has different results than a "virtual" group with the same age, Risser, curve magnitude, etc. characteristics then they can't say a damn thing about the efficacy of the study treatment. Yes? No? Someone is out to lunch here. If it's me then I'd like to know where I'm jumping the tracks on this.

Thanks. :)

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 09:08 PM
I would LOVE to know why ethicists gave them a green light. Other than stating that some othopedists don't agree and so there.....wow, clinical equipoise! Isn't that just convenient....we could do that with just about anything.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 09:12 PM
Beyond the rigors of science, if I had a younger teen with a smallish curve and all I wanted to do was to keep it from progressing before they finished growing, I'd certainly run my own study-of-one. :)

Of course!

But I'm running a study with n = 2 and it's still still stem to stern nonsense!

Midline disorders like scoliosis are not amenable to study with even monozygotic twins such as mine. That is, you wouldn't expect that their curve trajectories would be the same because the splitting of the egg is known not to produce "identical" zygotes apparently. As I have come to learn.

Love,
not a biologist and never will be

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 09:14 PM
I would LOVE to know why ethicists gave them a green light. Other than stating that some othopedists don't agree and so there.....wow, clinical equipoise! Isn't that just convenient....we could do that with just about anything.

No we couldn't.

At the far end, what about the folks who do jail time for withholding medical care from their children?

Apparently, some medical "facts" are so well known that they actually will throw parents in jail for withholding them.

And your explanation is...

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 09:15 PM
I would LOVE to know why ethicists gave them a green light.

You know the reason.

hdugger
09-05-2009, 09:18 PM
My goodness! I had no idea that torso rotation was such an emotional topic! Remind me not to start talking about single payer health care!

Not to be presumptuous here, but really we're all just trying to keep our kids happy and healthy and make it through what must be a very trying time for all of us. I know it's very trying for me. With that in mind (to vaguely quote Randy Newman), if we can't help each other out can't we please, please just leave each other alone.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 09:18 PM
I thought the editorial comment on the 2003 study was a fair assessment: "The authors are to be congratulated for bringing to our attention a novel and interesting method for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, which will stimulate interest and research."

Look, I obviously know nothing about medicine but I can tell you that appears to be a failure of the review process if that was published in a peer-reviewed journal.

If I, as a lay person, can find what certainly appear to be fatal flaws, where oh were were the peer reviewers?

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 09:19 PM
My goodness! I had no idea that torso rotation was such an emotional topic! Remind me not to start talking about single payer health care!

Not to be presumptuous here, but really we're all just trying to keep our kids happy and healthy and make it through what must be a very trying time for all of us. I know it's very trying for me. With that in mind (to vaguely quote Randy Newman), if we can't help each other out can't we please, please just leave each other alone.

I agree but Balletmom has a ridiculous obsession with me. She will not leave me alone.

I don't mind engaging her but she is obsessed.

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 09:43 PM
Obsessed with you? How funny. No, I just try to counter your statements that are made with 100 percent certainty on your part, so as to try and keep other viewers from being misled by believing your comments just because the comments are made so emphatically.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 09:50 PM
Obsessed with you? How funny. No, I just try to counter your statements that are made with 100 percent certainty on your part, so as to try and keep other viewers from being misled by believing your comments just because the comments are made so emphatically.

I don't mind you disagreeing with me but you have to use facts and rational argument to do it.

Your comments on the Collins thread are typical of the problem with your responses to me. Its the difference between intelligence (which you obviously have) and knowledge which you are lacking on certain subjects.

Plus you are not careful with your posts. For example, you seem to think I claimed that my horse's name is "Pooka." I challenge you to find a post to that effect. Rather I have stated who "Pooka" is on at least one occasion and it is not my horse. But you simply assumed it was my horse. I suggest that "shoot from the hip" approach is counterproductive and I will point it out every time.

Now you have been very good on topics on which you do have knowledge such as the one on hyperextension of joints and how that quality is sought after in rhythmic gymnastics (or whatever). Clearly you knew what the heck you were talking about and made your point clearly and concisely. It was extremely persuasive.

It would be good if you achieved that with more of your posts.

bcputnam
09-05-2009, 09:51 PM
Just to let everyone know...I plan on seeking a second opinion (DO Orthopedic Surgeon referred from SRS):o on the next moves that we should or should not take. I like to get as many inputs as possible. I'll keep you posted on our next visit. Please keep the great insights and experience coming...as I mention...."new to the game".

Thanks all!

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 09:53 PM
Just to let everyone know...I plan on seeking a second opinion (DO Orthopedic Surgeon referred from SRS):o on the next moves that we should or should not take. I like to get as many inputs as possible. I'll keep you posted on our next visit. Please keep the great insights and experience coming...as I mention...."new to the game".

Thanks all!

Thanks for keeping us posted.

We have no surgeons posting here (obviously!) and it's always good to hear what any one of them is saying.

SSO had a researcher post a few posts so that was wonderful.

Ballet Mom
09-05-2009, 10:05 PM
A wise decision bcputnam!


Pooka, I'm pretty sure I didn't just dream up that your horse was named Pooka1...I'm pretty sure you stated that in one of your posts. However, since posts can be edited, we'll never know. Anyhow, I'm not going to continue this debate. If Pooka is your snake, so be it.

You might just allow other people to have educated opinions that are different than yours instead of trying to force everyone to accept your views as fact, and your comments would be better received.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 10:14 PM
A wise decision bcputnam!


Pooka, I'm pretty sure I didn't just dream up that your horse was named Pooka1...I'm pretty sure you stated that in one of your posts.

I did state who Pooka was and it wasn't my horse.


However, since posts can be edited, we'll never know. Anyhow, I'm not going to continue this debate. If Pooka is your snake, so be it.

Pooka is my daughter's snake and I have never edited any post about that. On SSO I stated what my horse's nickname is and it's not Pooka. And that PREDATES your claim that Pooka is my horse. It never has been Pooka so there would be no reason to edit.

The fact that you think I edited after you questioned it is reflective of your state of mind and your projecting.

And I might add I never would have accused you of editing a post just to win an irrelevant argument even now. That's the difference between you and me apparently.


You might just allow other people to have educated opinions that are different than yours instead of trying to force everyone to accept your views as fact, and your comments would be better received.

That's what the creationists say and they are still 1,0000 % wrong.

Everyone is entitled to their own opinions. They are NOT entitled to their own facts. That's where the creationists go wrong and where the flat-earthers go wrong and where the astrologers go wrong and where you go wrong.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 10:15 PM
Pooka, I'm pretty sure I didn't just dream up that your horse was named Pooka1...I'm pretty sure you stated that in one of your posts. \

This is the problem in a nutshell.

That you are "pretty sure" you didn't dream something up when in fact you did.

Please consider that going forward.

Pooka1
09-05-2009, 10:28 PM
There is an unedited post on 9 Oct 2008 explaining that Pooka is my daughter's snake.

There is an unedited post from 26 Sept 2009 also explaining the same thing.

You will not find any post where I claim Pooka is my horse. Some people are honest.

The bottom line here is that your error in this matter is of a piece with your errors in other, relevant matters.

Getting the facts straight matters. That is the issue on everything, not just this.

Mom_15
09-06-2009, 05:47 PM
I came here looking for support and answers and discover an argument. I fully believe that there are more important things to dicuss in this forum than where someone's nickname came from. Or perhaps I am in the wrong place.

Pooka1
09-06-2009, 05:52 PM
I came here looking for support and answers and discover an argument. I fully believe that there are more important things to dicuss in this forum than where someone's nickname came from. Or perhaps I am in the wrong place.

You're right. That issue is irrelevant.

What isn't irrelevant is using it as an example to explain to Balletmom how she posts counterfactual material at an alarming rate. That is neither helpful nor honest towards people trying to get the facts.

I would support Linda removing the irrelevant posts. Point made.

Ballet Mom
09-06-2009, 09:43 PM
I would support Linda removing the irrelevant posts. Point made.

I think the posts should stay. Enough of Pooka running to Linda to edit out the posts she doesn't agree with. I think her comments help people to decide whether to listen to her or not.

Somehow I remember from the archives, doing my voluminous research of scoliosis, you stating that your horse was named Pooka. It is hard to go through the archives without running into a post from you constantly. My research predates December by a long time. But whatever, if for whatever reason, that is incorrect, I will remove my post from the other thread. No problem. No reason to get hysterical again.


What isn't irrelevant is using it as an example to explain to Balletmom how she posts counterfactual material at an alarming rate. That is neither helpful nor honest towards people trying to get the facts.

Listen we all need to bow to Pooka's all-knowingness. She knows everything, nobody else could possibly know or reason out anything different than her viewpoint. All Hail Pooka!.....and that's about the nicest thing that I can come up to say in response to that ridiculous statement.

Ballet Mom
09-06-2009, 09:46 PM
Isn't that interesting, in editing that post, I found you can just delete posts without a trace....interesting.

Pooka1
09-06-2009, 09:59 PM
Isn't that interesting, in editing that post, I found you can just delete posts without a trace....interesting.

At this point you should be apologizing, not digging a deeper hole.

You need to consider your "certainty" about my horse's name is the issue with many of your posts. You are "certain" of a boatload of counterfactual things.

Dreaming up conspiracy theories about edited or deleted posts is just shameful.