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View Full Version : Melatonin may have helped my son's Scoliosis



Dingo
05-24-2009, 02:29 PM
I posted this in the research forum but I thought it might help someone else who is watching and waiting.

Background

On my son's 4th birthday his pediatrician noticed a small rib hump. He did not take an x-ray and he told us to watch and wait. On Scott's 5th birthday the rib hump had increased and his pediatrician sent us to a scoliosis specialist. My son was diagnosed with a 12 degree thorocolumbar curve.

How fast had his curve been progressing?
From old movies we can tell that his curve started sometime between the age of 2 and 3.5. This means that his curve had been progressing at a rate between 4 and 8 degrees per year.
Start age 2 = 4 degrees per year
Start age 3 = 6 degrees per year
Start age 3.5 = 8 degrees per year

What we did
Around 2 months after Scott's official diagnosis we blacked out his room to increase his natural prodution of Melatonin. His sleep and mood in the morning improved immediately. At around 5 months we started giving my son pharmeceutical grade fish oil supplements with his breakfast in the hope that it might increase Melatonin production and reduce any inflammation associated with Scoliosis.

Recheck
A week ago Scott visitied the doctor for his first recheck. It had been 7.5 months and his curve measured 11 degrees. The doctor called it stable.

What might this mean?
A) The doctor measured his curve incorrectly
B) The curve stopped progressing on it's own
C) Scott's curve stopped progressing because we increased his natural production of Melatonin. This is consistent with the findings of the Japanese study mentioned at the beginning of this thread on Melatonin and Scoliosis (http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=8637).

concerned dad
05-26-2009, 09:33 AM
Great post Dingo!

Ballet Mom
05-26-2009, 12:30 PM
Okay, it's worth a shot. My daughter has the double-jointed joint structure which apparently must give her a tendency towards scoliosis. As I said in another post, the hyper-extended joints or double-jointedness seems to go hand in hand with scoliosis in the ballet world, although it usually results in mild cases.

So what was causing my daughter's rapid progression prior to bracing? My daughter did used to get night terrors when she was a toddler and so we used to keep the light on for her at night. She had a terrible nightmare when she was a little older of all her Barbies in her room attacking her and then was scared to fall asleep without the lights on (even though we removed the Barbies). She still refuses to fall asleep without the light on when she goes to bed. I have to admit that sometimes I fall asleep and don't get up to turn the light out and certainly the light is on for a few hours each night while she's sleeping prior to my turning it out.

Thanks for having posted about this, I was thinking the trigger might have been the infectious disease organisms you were also pointing out, but I suppose maybe this could be a factor.

So, I guess I will find something to block out the streetlight outside, move her alarm clock and make sure the light is turned off immediately after she falls asleep. Specifically, what do you mean when you talk about "pharmeceutical grade fish oil supplements"? Can you name some brands so I can get some with the correct omega-X fatty acids? It certainly doesn't sound like any of this could hurt her, so it's worth a try.

Thanks.

mamandcrm
05-26-2009, 06:33 PM
Hey Dingo,

I think it's great that you are trying to be proactive with your child. There certainly is nothing harmful about blacking out the lights and fish oil. I have been doing both for my kids for years, for no reason that has anything to do with scoliosis. I read years ago that kids who use nightlights are more likely to need glasses down the road; and that fish oil may help ADD/ADHD kids (or borderline kids) and generally promotes brain health. I find it a bonus now that maybe those measures may help my daughter.

Dingo
05-26-2009, 08:09 PM
Thanks you guys, you are all too nice. :) I hope this helps someone and like mamandcrm said it certainly won't hurt.

Ballet Mom
Scoliosis appears to be caused by a combination of genes and environment. I believe that like Type 1 Diabetes (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090305141639.htm) the environmental component for the type of Scoliosis found in this study (http://pico.sssup.it/files/allegati/2004_1469.pdf) is infectious disease. As soon as this year we'll have a blood test that will tell us if our children have this type of Scoliosis.

However even if your/my child has this kind of Scoliosis that doesn't mean that Melatonin won't help. Lack of Melatonin might not cause Scoliosis but maximizing Melatonin might be an effective treatment or at least helpful. The Japanese researchers think it helps quite a bit, so does a spine surgeon I talked to the other day.

In addition, physical therapy might be able to overcome Scoliosis no matter the cause. This study (http://www.medxonline.com/downloads/articles/measuredresistanceinscoliosis.pdf) (and 2 others just like it) suggest that just 30 minutes of Torso rotation exercise per week can stop and even reverse curve progression. I heard through the grapevine that a 4th Torso Rotation study may be starting up in Texas very soon.

God Bless the Internet. :) I wouldn't have been able to find out any of this just 20 years ago.

hope404
05-26-2009, 10:33 PM
Dingo... where can I find or see this torso rotation exercise. Curious as to what it is???

Dingo
05-26-2009, 11:00 PM
hope404

Just click this link (http://www.medxonline.com/downloads/articles/measuredresistanceinscoliosis.pdf). The study starts on the 2nd page of the PDF.

I believe this is the machine (http://www.medxonline.com/exercise.php?product=TorsoRotation2) they used but any torso rotation machine should work. Any good gym should have one of these. The point is to create equal muscle strength on both sides of the spine. It appears that all children with Scoliosis have muscle asymmetry.

This gym (http://www.mlhf.com/scoliosis.html) offers a program based on Dr. Mooney's work.

Ballet Mom
05-28-2009, 12:59 PM
God Bless the Internet. I wouldn't have been able to find out any of this just 20 years ago.

I totally agree. Used with great caution, the internet is an amazing tool.

Writer
05-29-2009, 01:09 AM
There have been previous discussions of Dr Mooney's Medx experiments here. Search on "medx". I've worked with the machine myself; it's inconclusive whether it helped the curves. I can testify, though, that before starting there was a very large discrepancy in the weight I could push to my concave side vs the convex. It evened out in about two months of a few minutes' work 2-3x/week. The system works very fast, and it's easy.

Problem is that it is not so easy to determine exactly which muscles are being exercised, and it's not apparent to me that the researchers even attempted to determine this fully. They mention a few muscle groups, but not all that are likely involved in a scoliosis. My scoliosis is not configured like your daughter's scoliosis, or her best friend's, so of course we are likely to get different results.

Also, the machine focuses on rotation -- one plane, two dimensions. But scoliosis is a three-dimensional problem. The spine needs to be elongated as well, an aspect which this machine does not address. There are significant out-of-balance muscle groups that it does not target. So it can never be the only answer. They do mention lumbar extensor training, but that's not part of the rotational study.

However, I think that the rotation machine deserves very serious consideration as part of a rehab program. Before putting my child on it, though, I'd consult with a physical therapist who really understood the muscular dynamics of scoliosis in general and the child's individual scoliotic configuration, as well as the function of the machine. You'd want to understand which muscle groups would be likely to improve on the machine, and be reassured that no already overly strong muscles would be strengthened further and thus perhaps increase the curve.

Mooney is a very smart and imaginative spine doctor. Good for him for inaugurating this research. Too bad he's abandoned the project, but others have picked it up and will surely continue.

Dingo
05-29-2009, 11:12 AM
Writer


Also, the machine focuses on rotation -- one plane, two dimensions. But scoliosis is a three-dimensional problem.

You are correct. This line of research gets scant attention and torso strengthening is one of many possible strength training exercises that could be beneficial. I talked to one of the scientists involved and he mentioned that other strength training exercises may help. I didn't press him on the specifics because my general sense is that strength training is beneficial because it promotes symmetry. It's well documented that child atheletes have high rates of Scoliosis probably because they favor one side and develop muscle asymmetry.

PubMed - Scoliosis in swimmers. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3512101)


The high-repetition nature of competitive swimming causes imbalances of musculature in the adolescent athlete. Scoliosis as a musculoskeletal condition of the adolescent can be detected in high incidence among swimmers owing to the training phenomenon.

If Asymmetry is the problem some of the exercises on this page may help. I am not a scientist so I can't say this with conviction.

Bodybuilding.com middle back exercises (http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/exercises.php?MainMuscle=Middle+Back)

Bodybuilding.com lower back exercises (http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/exercises.php?MainMuscle=Lower+Back)

I should note that when I was a kid in the 1970s and 1980s everyone knew that strength training was harmful for growing children. Whoops, I guess we were wrong.

WebMD - American Academy of Pediatrics on Strength Training for children (http://children.webmd.com/news/20080407/new-strength-training-advice-for-kids)

Dingo
05-29-2009, 11:18 AM
Writer

You might be interested in this. I'm doing an interview with a spine surgeon who holds patents on several medical devices. Some of these are for Scoliosis, others are designed for other spinal problems. I hope to post the whole thing within the next week or two.

Anyway you might be interested to read his explanation of the mechanical cause of Scoliosis.


Scoliosis is not just a lateral bending of the spine. It is a lateral bend linked with rotation. For rotation to occur there must be an axis of rotation in the midline. I proved this with growing rabbits and a dog while I was still in training. What happens is while the spine grows, the back of the spine is tethered by the ligaments, while the front (where the vertebral bodies are which support the weight) grows without restraints. Eventually there is too much length in the front, and very tight structures in the back. The spine then pops off to the side creating a spiral around the tight structures in the back (which stay almost straight). As such it is growth that powers the curve. If the posterior structures can be stretched-out by hormones of pregnancy, exercise, sleep, etc. or the anterior structure shorten by dehydration of the disk, aging, hormones, etc.; then the curve would be expected to improve. After a certain amount of curve, gravity prevents spontaneous correction.

My take away from this is that the muscles in the back pull the spine out of place. This is consistent with asymmetry.

Since nearly all growth takes place at night we began stretching out my son before he goes to bed. After about 5 mintues of stretching we run a massager up and down his back for another minute or so. I don't know if this will help but stretching his back before he sleeps makes some degree of sense. In any case I don't have 10 years to wait for the clinical study. :)

Pooka1
05-29-2009, 11:27 AM
It's well documented that child atheletes have high rates of Scoliosis probably because they favor one side and develop muscle asymmetry.

PubMed - Scoliosis in swimmers. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3512101)

I find that strange. Swimming would seem to require symmetrical movement to stay in the lane. If they are moving asymmetrically then they are compensating for a pre-existing asymmetry it would seem.

I would think certain riding disciplines that focus on absolute straightness and symmetry in the horse (dressage for example) requires riders to be absolutely symmetrical or to completely compensate for any asymmetries in their bodies. This asymmetry, even in folks without scoliosis is one of the millions of reasons why most folks never make it out of the lower levels.

So not all sports are equal in this regard.

Dingo
05-29-2009, 11:30 AM
I find that strange. Swimming would seem to require symmetrical movement to stay in the lane.

A swimmer might be able to explain this but evidently the body finds a way to favor a side. I believe that dancers and cheerleaders have high rates of Scoliosis as well.

Pooka1
05-29-2009, 11:42 AM
A swimmer might be able to explain this but evidently the body finds a way to favor a side. I believe that dancers and cheerleaders have high rates of Scoliosis as well.

I think there may be an issue of what is cause and what is effect.

Maybe folks with a certain body type are draw to, or otherwise excel in, certain activities.

Here is something strange... two sports that require absolute straightness and symmetry in the body, ice skating and dressage, both seem to have gay men over-represented at the top of the ranks compared to their prevalence in the general population.

A reasonable explanation is that the biological basis of homosexuality might be somehow linked to high ability in certain sports. Maybe a similar type of case can be made for a biological cause of scoliosis that also happens to correlate with high ability in certain sports. An example might be ballet and scoliosis if scoliotics are in fact over-represented in the ballet ranks compared to the general population. I don't know.

Dingo
05-29-2009, 12:25 PM
Maybe a similar type of case can be made for a biological cause of scoliosis that also happens to correlate with high ability in certain sports.

There might be 100 different reasons for muscle asymmetry and only a few have to do with athletics.

1) All children with Scoliosis have muscle asymmetry
2) Specific strength training exercises eliminate muscle asymmetry
3) Once the asymmetry is eliminated curves stop progressing and can even reverse

To me it's pretty clear that asymmetry is the problem. Someone might come up with a better explanation but until that point this looks strong.

Pooka1
05-29-2009, 12:33 PM
1) All children with Scoliosis have muscle asymmetry

Yes due to the curving spine.


2) Specific strength training exercises eliminate muscle asymmetry

Yes strength training can compensate for the asymmetric muscling as can laser-like attention to symmetry, and compensation for uncorrectable asymmetry, is required for dressage.


3) Once the asymmetry is eliminated curves stop progressing and can even reverse

Exercise has not been shown to stop curve progression in my understanding. Smaller curves stop, correct, and sometimes disappear completely in patients who do nothing including no targeted exercises.


To me it's pretty clear that asymmetry is the problem. Someone might come up with a better explanation but until that point this looks strong.

Are you saying the muscle asymmetry caused the scoliosis? What is the evidence for that? That might be the case in scoliosis related to polio but I don't know that. I think that has been ruled out for AIS or else it wouldn't be called AIS.

Dingo
05-29-2009, 12:46 PM
1) All children with Scoliosis have muscle asymmetry

Yes due to the curving spine.

Actually I don't believe that's true. At the very least I know that the nervous system in the spine does not function the same way in children with AIS when compared to children with Scoliosis that has a known cause, i.e. physical deformity. Nerve signals run up and down the spine slower in children with AIS and this is not related to their curve.


Exercise has not been shown to stop curve progression in my understanding.

Three studies found that Torso rotation can stop and even reverse curve progression. Here is a link to the first study (http://www.medxonline.com/downloads/articles/measuredresistanceinscoliosis.pdf). Check out page 4 and keep in mind that none of these kids were braced.


Are you saying the muscle asymmetry caused the scoliosis? What is the evidence for that? That might be the case in scoliosis related to polio but I don't know that. I think that has been ruled out for AIS or else it wouldn't be called AIS.

You are right, it's currently unproven. But I believe that's where the evidence is taking us.

concerned dad
05-29-2009, 04:00 PM
What I want to know when I read a study like the one you Linked (http://www.medxonline.com/downloads/articles/measuredresistanceinscoliosis.pdf)is:

What is going on with their curves today?

The paper is 6 years old. I suppose the researchers have moved on with their lives, but I would love to know how the kids made out in the long term.

The nice thing about the papers from the SpineCor folks is that they report on the same cohort of patients and follow them up over time (with many now having reached 5 years post brace). Of course, I would like to see all their xrays independently (and blindly) measured and the results presented.

Dingo
05-29-2009, 04:11 PM
concerned dad

Here is an old thread (http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=3627) that may provide some insight.

Gerbo

Similarly to what i asked a year ago, are you still following your initial study group and has stabilisation been maintained?

Dr. Mooney

I have followed some and stabilization has been maintained.


Journal of Musculoskeletal Medicine - March 2007 (http://www.fasciaresearch.com/WCLBP/Barcelona/Mooney_Exercise%20for%20Managing%20Adolescent%20Sc oliosis.pdf)
This one is a little hard to read but it's interesting. Therapists in New Zealand tried the same protocol and produced the same results.

The last 2 sentences in the conclusion are unambiguous.


Brief exercises performed twice a week are adequate. Braces are not necessary.

concerned dad
05-29-2009, 04:59 PM
My neck is going to curve reading that paper (scanned at an angle)
:D

Is that what you mean by "hard to read"?

Dingo
05-29-2009, 06:41 PM
concerned dad


My neck is going to curve reading that paper (scanned at an angle)

Yeah, it's terrible. Maybe I should have included a disclaimer.

Reading this paper can potentially give you Scoliosis. :eek:

Ballet Mom
05-30-2009, 03:18 AM
I'm doing an interview with a spine surgeon who holds patents on several medical devices. Some of these are for Scoliosis, others are designed for other spinal problems. I hope to post the whole thing within the next week or two.

Dingo! This sure sounds like my "mad scientist" what with his explanation of the mechanical cause of scoliosis! I hope it is, I'd love to hear more about his research. You're awesome if you got an interview with him....:)

Dingo
05-30-2009, 05:04 PM
Ballet Mom

Thanks! Well... I don't want to give anything away just yet.

I'm just waiting for the answers to my follow-ups right now. :)

Hopefully I'll have it up ASAP!

Ballet Mom
05-30-2009, 06:13 PM
:D Thank you Dingo! :D

And what's really great about his view of the mechanical reasons for scoliosis is it sounds like it could perhaps be treated in the future without surgery or bracing! That is simply wonderful.


If the posterior structures can be stretched-out by hormones of pregnancy, exercise, sleep, etc. or the anterior structure shorten by dehydration of the disk, aging, hormones, etc.; then the curve would be expected to improve.

Trying not to jump to conclusions, maybe all our debating about whether bracing works or not is futile! Maybe a shot of pregnancy hormone to the ligaments at the back of the spine and some exercises could stop the progression. Wouldn't that be something. And maybe that's why the brace and dance is working for my daughter. Perhaps the stretching of the back during ballet and the stretching of her spine with the Charleston's dramatic correction is helping to stretch out those tight ligaments at the back of the spine. Very, very interesting. Thank you so much for pursuing this. :cool:

And taking it a little further, maybe the DNA test could be used in doctor's offices at kids' physicals to see who, prior to the onset of the adolescent growth spurt, could benefit by being treated before the curve starts its rapid onset and really minimize the amount of spine curvature that occurs before being detected physically. Fantastic...but I am running away with my imagination here, and should stop. But really thrilling thoughts, to me anyway. :)

Dingo
05-30-2009, 07:17 PM
Perhaps the stretching of the back during ballet and the stretching of her spine with the Charleston's dramatic correction is helping to stretch out those tight ligaments at the back of the spine.

I say this without scientific data to back myself up. However...

Nearly all spinal growth takes place at night. If stretching helps at all it's probably most benefical right before a child goes to sleep.

After my son brushes his teeth he does 50 rotations with a stabliity ball. It looks just like this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTDJXc18UfE) except we don't do the chest press part. I stand behind him to make sure he stretches the same speed and distance in each direction. I put my hands up to block the ball if he goes too far. Then we sit down and stretch out for a couple of minutes like this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TguhxRz0o8). After that he gets into bed and I use a massager like this model (http://www.homedics.com/products/massage/handheld-massagers/therapist-select-compact-percussion-massager.html) on his back for about a minute. The whole thing takes less than 5 minutes and it loosens him up tremendously.

I don't know if this works but it makes sense that it could. Like I said before I can't wait 10 years for the clinical study. :)

hope404
05-30-2009, 09:11 PM
Dingo....

Have been reading your posts with great interest.....thanks for sharing...look forward to hearing more of your ideas....in the future:)

Dingo
05-30-2009, 11:42 PM
hope404

Thanks Hope,

Sitting around and doing nothing was a nightmare for me. I was relieved when I discovered that there were things parents can do that probably help and certainly won't hurt. I hope these things help other kids besides my own.

hope404
06-01-2009, 11:55 PM
Dingo,
"sitting around and doing nothing"

Being a parent of a child with Scoliosis,to be honest, has been maddening!!!

There is so little info. and so few options. I can't count the number of nights

I've pondered ...what causes it...how to fix it...etc. As an Occupational therapist, I've seen severe scoliosis cases where the child is froze in various
reflex states. Assymetrical Tonic Neck Reflex being the most common. Has my child not integrated the various postural reflexes earlier in life ????? Why is one side of her spine "over firing" and the other side not...??? Is one of the postural reflexes (which should be gone) still present in a dysfunctional sort of way??? Could Occupational Therapy, which can do therapy to help integrate the postural reflexes, help???

I identify with your need to do something while your child is so young (VERY SMART!!!) Wish you the best.

hope404
06-02-2009, 12:02 AM
Didn't realize I was in the Melatonin thread..

Just a side note..my daughter (who has the scoliosis) is the only one of our 6 member family with terrible sleep issues. Very restless sleep...talks in her sleep...wakes up super early... can't fall back asleep..blah..blah. Has had these issues since childhood.

Have started to darken her room more and give her a Melatonin supplement(she's 18)...see if it helps.

Dingo
06-02-2009, 12:05 AM
hope404

The underlying cause of a lot (maybe most) idiopathic scoliosis appears to be a dysfunction in the central nervous system. This disorder can be detected with a simple blood test.

I've talked to one of the researchers involved in the Scoliosis blood test and it could FDA approved and in use as soon as this year. I've heard through the grapevine that an announcement is imminent.

Here is the study that this test is partially based on.
Melatonin Signaling Dysfunction in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (http://pico.sssup.it/files/allegati/2004_1469.pdf)

I think it's still a mystery why this causes the back to rotate and curve. Evidently it leads to muscle asymmetry in the spine because all children with Scoliosis have trunk rotational asymmetry (http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2072936). On the surface this could easily be explained away as a side effect of the curved spine. But studies prove that it's more than a side effect because eliminating the asymmetry corrects Scoliotic curves.

Asymmetry combined with growth appears to be where the rubber meets the road.

Dingo
06-02-2009, 12:31 AM
hope404


Just a side note..my daughter (who has the scoliosis) is the only one of our 6 member family with terrible sleep issues. Very restless sleep...talks in her sleep...wakes up super early... can't fall back asleep..blah..blah. Has had these issues since childhood.

That's interesting because my son had always been a very light sleeper until we darkened his room. Any noise or disturbance would wake him at night and every morning he'd come down the stairs upset. His emotions would run wild for 20 or 30 minutes each morning and many times he'd cry at the sight of his breakfast. This had been going on for years and nothing we tried helped. We grew to accept it as a quirk that he would eventually grow out of.

This disappeared when we darkened his room. Looking back I wonder why we never put his moodiness together with poor sleep but we didn't.

MissEmmyF
06-02-2009, 11:26 AM
After my son brushes his teeth he does 50 rotations with a stabliity ball. It looks just like this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTDJXc18UfE) except we don't do the chest press part. I stand behind him to make sure he stretches the same speed and distance in each direction. I put my hands up to block the ball if he goes too far. Then we sit down and stretch out for a couple of minutes like this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TguhxRz0o8). After that he gets into bed and I use a massager like this model (http://www.homedics.com/products/massage/handheld-massagers/therapist-select-compact-percussion-massager.html) on his back for about a minute. The whole thing takes less than 5 minutes and it loosens him up tremendously.

I've been very interested in reading about all these trunk rotational exercises/studies. I have a question; or maybe more of a thought really. I've been doing Schroth exercises for about 2 weeks now, and before each exercise is done, heavy emphasis is placed on "correcting your pelvis position" since it's the main base of your whole body. What I mean by this I have a left hip prominence. So, before I do any Schroth exercises, I do a few "adjustments" to get my pelvis into it's proper place (basically, I shift it over to the right and back). Then, once I actually do the exercises, my muscles are being trained to hold everything in the corrected position (with my pelvis in the correct location), etc.

Sooo, my question is, if you're just standing or sitting in a neutral position while doing these trunk rotational exercises, I'm wondering if you're just kind of strengthening the muscles overall or in general vs. retraining them to work in a more efficient manner while you're in a corrected position. Does that make sense?

MissEmmyF
06-02-2009, 11:28 AM
Sooo, my question is, if you're just standing or sitting in a neutral position while doing these trunk rotational exercises, I'm wondering if you're just kind of strengthening the muscles overall or in general vs. retraining them to work in a more efficient manner while you're in a corrected position. Does that make sense?

Oh, and obviously, "neutral" when you have scoliosis is what our body has come to think is "neutral" from the natural compensation that occurs with scoliosis. It's not actually "neutral."

Dingo
06-02-2009, 02:22 PM
MissEmmyF


I'm wondering if you're just kind of strengthening the muscles overall or in general vs. retraining them to work in a more efficient manner while you're in a corrected position. Does that make sense?

If I understand you correctly yes. What Mooney and later studies found was very uncomplicated. Torso rotation strength training builds strength equally on both sides of the spine. This causes most curves to regress and only the most severe curves continue to progress. Mooney's concept is to work on both sides equally. I believe that Scroth encourages patients to focus on a particular side.

MissEmmyF
06-02-2009, 05:01 PM
MissEmmyFMooney's concept is to work on both sides equally. I believe that Scroth encourages patients to focus on a particular side.

If you work on both sides equally, won't the side that's already strong become even stronger?

Dingo
06-02-2009, 06:54 PM
MissEmmyF

Strength training will produce the same level of strength on both sides. One side will not become stronger than the other.

For example:
Training start
50 pounds right turn rotation
30 pounds left turn rotation

4 months later
80 pounds right turn rotation
80 pounds left turn rotation

Your body has a natural potential and with progressive strength training you can ensure that you're doing the same work on both sides. This isn't possible with traditional exercise because your body will always favor a particular side. Morover your brain doesn't have a system to measure how much it's favoring a particular side.

Ballet Mom
06-03-2009, 01:35 PM
Dingo,

It sounds like this blood test you mention, if it works, will be much better than a possible DNA test to detect scoliosis in children prior to their growth spurt. What a great innovation. It will surely be less expensive than a genetic test, may be more accurate, and sounds like it could actually revolutionize the way these kids are treated. What wonderful news that the test might be out this year. I wish it had come out a few years ago...

Dingo
06-03-2009, 02:55 PM
Ballet Mom

I agree, the blood test appears to be a significant advancement over the genetic test.

First it measures the way the nervous system responds to Melatonin. There are three main types of Scoliosis and each child will know which type he/she has. This test is performed only once.

Second the test measures the level of what I'm 99% sure is Calmodulin. This part of the test is given several times per year. If Calmodulin levels rise curve progression is imminent. If Calmodulin levels are low curve progression is unlikely. Bracing lowers the level of calmodulin in the blood stream. I find that pretty amazing. Doctors will be able to use this to test to determine if a brace is effective because a good brace should lower calmodulin. Previously doctors had to watch and wait to determine if a brace was effective.

I talked to a scientist involved in the project and he thought the test would be FDA approved this year. If you live in Montreal you can get the test free of charge before it's final approval.

CAmomof2
06-03-2009, 05:45 PM
Our daughter is getting this test done at Montreal in August - we'll let you know what we find out!
S. :)

christine2
06-03-2009, 06:41 PM
We are also considering doing the test but Dr Rivard is preety sure that my daughter's levels will be low because of how effective her brace has been. So it may not be worth if for us.