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CHRIS WBS
04-01-2009, 02:33 PM
For all you youngsters concerned about losing flexibility, check out this girl in the video on her trampoline. Amazing! http://drlloydhey.blogspot.com/2009/03/14-yo-girl-3-months-after-scoliosis.html

Snoopy
04-01-2009, 03:46 PM
That video really surprises me. 1) A lot of orthopedic doctors strongly suggest their patients avoid trampolines. My daughter's doctor hates them and stated that he's seen too many accidents to convince him that they are safe. This applies to everyone--not just his Scoli patients. 2) I'm surprised that she was released to do such activity less than 3 months post-op.

I'm not surprised, however at her flexibility. These kids are amazing! My daughter is fused T3-L2 and her fusion doesn't hold her back from anything.

Mary Lou

FHlove24
04-02-2009, 08:21 AM
I am so surprised by this too. Everyone of the 13 surgeons I have seen say that you are more than likely to loose your range of motion and not be able to play sports again. My curve is 46 degrees so I am right on the line or surgery or no surgery and being able to play sports after is a big factor in making this decision. Is there anyone else who has had the surgery and went back to either softball or field hockey?
Thanks

titaniumed
04-02-2009, 10:59 AM
They should install trampolines in all hospitals. You can flip into bed with your ng tube and catheter in. LOL
Ed

LynnMarie74
04-02-2009, 02:10 PM
OHHHH MYYYYY GOD and the parents let this happen?!?!?!? Are they insane?! lol I felt sick to my stomach when I watched this. Eeeegads! Of course, I was picturing myself attempting this stunt......even before surgery....Wow! Thats crazy!

Snoopy
04-02-2009, 02:27 PM
I am so surprised by this too. Everyone of the 13 surgeons I have seen say that you are more than likely to loose your range of motion and not be able to play sports again. My curve is 46 degrees so I am right on the line or surgery or no surgery and being able to play sports after is a big factor in making this decision. Is there anyone else who has had the surgery and went back to either softball or field hockey?
Thanks


First, why so many surgeons? At 46*, do you have pain? Is your curve still progressing? Are you done growing? These are some very important things to think about when debating whether or not to have surgery.

Yes, sometimes you loose some flexibility, but it all depends on the length of your fusion. My daughter has a long fusion, T3-L2, and she does everything she wants to do without problems. She started swimming competively AFTER her fusion, she rides our 4-wheeler, she hunts, works, attends High School and College, etc. Oh, by the way, Jamie's Scoliosis was at 46* when she had surgery and her Kyphosis was at 71*.

Do a search on this forum using the name Pam or the word softball. You'll find a woman named Pam who returned to softball shortly after her surgery plus many other things. You'll find her inspiring and able to answer your question about softball. In another post, you worried about field hockey after surgery. That might be something you aren't allowed to play because of the physical contact. Physical contact sports are usually something most people are told to avoid after surgery.

Mary Lou

laurieg6
04-02-2009, 07:35 PM
Alexander was told that the only sports he couldn't do after surgery were contact sports like football and hockey. I don't know if field hockey is a contact sport like ice hockey, but if it is, it will probably be on the "not allowed" list (which is very short). Regarding trampolines, he still hasn't been on one and we were told to only go on them in a very minor way, certainly with a safety net around the outside.

momw/scoli
04-02-2009, 08:40 PM
Wow! That was amazing three months after surgery! What about high jump? Are there any high jumpers out there. My daughter best track event is high jump, and she just made the comment today "I probably won't be able to do the high jump" after surgery. This makes me think she can.
Becky
Mom to Emily 14 having surgery May 28

Beckymk
04-02-2009, 10:37 PM
Wow! That was amazing three months after surgery! What about high jump? Are there any high jumpers out there.

I'm not sure but if I recall the high jump they have to arch their back very similar to gymnastics (I was told gymnasts make good high jumpers since they use similar motions but ????? on that. My DD wouldn't be NEAR a track! ;) ). Therefore I'm thinking that might be an out event. You would have to ask the doctor on that one.

Snoopy
04-03-2009, 07:00 AM
Wow! That was amazing three months after surgery! What about high jump? Are there any high jumpers out there. My daughter best track event is high jump, and she just made the comment today "I probably won't be able to do the high jump" after surgery. This makes me think she can.
Becky
Mom to Emily 14 having surgery May 28

I would think that with enough practice, she'd learn to go over the bar in her own way. My daughter can't do a "flip turn" when swimming, but I've heard others who can even after surgery. Most kids just lean to adjust. My concern however, would be the landing. I'd like to hear your doctor's answer.

Mary Lou

txmarinemom
04-04-2009, 05:47 PM
I am so surprised by this too. Everyone of the 13 surgeons I have seen say that you are more than likely to loose your range of motion and not be able to play sports again. My curve is 46 degrees so I am right on the line or surgery or no surgery and being able to play sports after is a big factor in making this decision. Is there anyone else who has had the surgery and went back to either softball or field hockey?
Thanks

FHlove,

I'm 40, and was back playing softball - including sliding and hitting the ground after balls near 2nd base - at 7 months post-op.

Regards,
Pam

ScolioDan
04-06-2009, 12:51 PM
One of my biggest concerns is how my operation will effect my sports, especially my golf. I will be very nervous the first few months after when I start checking to see how much mobility I have in that area.

txmarinemom
04-06-2009, 02:30 PM
One of my biggest concerns is how my operation will effect my sports, especially my golf. I will be very nervous the first few months after when I start checking to see how much mobility I have in that area.

Dan, I play golf post-op with no issues. It's possible someone with a longer and/or lower fusion than mine (which stops at L1) might need to make some adjustments, but I believe it's entirely doable.

Incase you haven't seen this, here's a bit of encouragement for you: Stacy Lewis (http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/stacy-lewis-is-the-best-story-in-golf-771878.html) (who hails from just north of Houston) had scoliosis fusion the year a scholarship awaited her at the University of Arkansas. She went on to not only be a NCAA standout, she's on the 2009 LPGA Tour (http://www.golfdigest.com/magazine/2009/03/digest_stina);-).

Her bio even shows her before and after x-rays (http://stacysback.com/bio.php).

Happy golfing!

Pam

ScolioDan
04-08-2009, 10:59 AM
Thats interesting, I think my operation will start at in a similar place to hers but go higher. Thankyou for posting that I will look into her case in more detail.

tonibunny
04-08-2009, 01:50 PM
I was fused T1-T12 at the age of ten, but once my spine was fused I went back to doing full PE/games at school including hockey, netball, tennis - everything that everyone else did.

I had my fusion extended to L3 when I was 18 but was able to continue with the activities I did then: playing hockey, dancing in nightclubs at least once a week, fencing, and hillwalking.

I'm due to have my fusion extended down to L4 and despite this I'm not expecting to be any more restricted than before. I'll continue fencing, cycling, hillwalking and doing everything I enjoy now I'm in my 30s. I'm going to learn to ride horses this summer too :D

I don't think people should worry so much about being restricted by having a fusion. Good luck! :)

marmyte
04-08-2009, 03:23 PM
there's nothing i wouldn't at least try having had surgery - life's too short! if you break your back, it gets fixed, so what?

i was driving at 7 weeks post op and back on a horse 2 weeks later (with doctor's permission). i didn't jump until about 6 months after surgery but that was more my decision than not being physically ready.

i think that once you're solid, if your range of movement allows then do it. and if your range of movement doesn't allow then it just means you have to get creative! some of your limitations will be temporary as once restrictions get lifted your muscles will have stiffened up due to inactivity so it'll take a while before you have a full idea of what you can and can't achieve.