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harr321
08-24-2004, 09:51 PM
Hi there, my daughter is 14 years old and does not have any backpain but has a curve of 51 degrees. She is fine with the way she looks and with not having any backpain I do not see a need for surgery but that is what the dr. is recommending. She has never wore a brace. The Dr. said it wouldn't work for her. Is there any other alternamtives out there that would work? Has anyone tried the Scoliosis Advanced Recovery System? According to their website it works but according to other web sites surgery is our only option. She is very athetic and doesnt' want any of her flexibiltiy taken away. Is she too old for stapling?

Help I'm very confused.

LindaRacine
08-24-2004, 10:27 PM
Hi...

Your daughter is probably too old for stapling. Stapling is used as an alternative to bracing, and neither will work once the child is skeletally mature (which your daughter almost certainly would be).

There is zero proof that the Scoliosis Advanced Recovery System works for anyone with a curve as large as your daughter's. If you have a lot of money, and want to feel like you're doing something, than you might want to give it a try. Just don't expect too much.

A better alternative might be yoga. If your daughter is the type that could be dedicated to daily exercise (for the rest of her life), she might be able to avoid surgery.

At 51 degrees, your daughter's curve has a good chance of increasing, but probably won't do so very quickly. You might want to let it go several years to document progression. If you find that the curve is increasing, it would be better if she had the surgery while she's a teenager than waiting until she's older. And, if there's no progression, it's possible that she'll be able to avoid surgery forever.

Good luck!

Regards,
Linda

harr321
08-24-2004, 10:37 PM
Hi there, I have a question, according to the x-ray report her iliac crests are not fused. Does this mean she is not skeletonally matured? The Dr. did say she has a chance to continue to grow?

LindaRacine
08-24-2004, 10:43 PM
That's correct. Did he give you her Risser score? Is she menstruating yet? And if so, how long ago did her periods start?

--Linda

harr321
08-24-2004, 10:47 PM
He did not give us her Risser score but she started her periods when she turned 13 and she will be 15 middle of november.

LindaRacine
08-24-2004, 11:10 PM
Hi...

Although I think your daughter's doctor is right about bracing not being an option, you might feel better if you get a second opinion. If you find out that she's Risser 4+, I think you may just be spinning your wheels.

Not that you'll necessarily understand all of it, but here's what is written about menarche in terms of skeletal maturity in "Spinal Deformities The Comprehensive Text":

Memarche is a readily identifiable maturity indicator. It always occurs after the PHV (peak height velocity) and is markedly variable compared with the Risser stage ranging from Risser 1 to Risser 5. A number of studies indicate the risk of progression is significantly lower after than before menarche. Although it is usually a relative sign that growth is decreasing, it is much too variable for accurate assessments.

(Although not tested prospectively, in two retrospective stsudies, the timing of the PHV is more determinate than Risser status or chronological age in curve progression. Unfortunately, the only current method of identifying the adolescent growth peak is by direct clinical measurement of the height velocity necessitating serial height measurements.)

And, here's a link to some research about curve progression in skeletally immature patients:

http://www.vh.org/pediatric/provider/orthopaedics/AIS/06Probabilities.html

If you look at the chart on the bottom, you'll see that your daughter has a 70%+ chance of curve progression.

Regards,
Linda

Carmell
08-25-2004, 01:47 PM
Hi,

I just wanted to repeat what Linda said about the urgency of surgery. Scoliosis is RARELY a reason for emergent surgery. Your daughter has many variables to consider, including her age, her skeletal maturity, her pain/lack of pain, her cosmetic appearance, her activity level, etc. If she were my daughter, I would get at least one other opinion from a pediatric orthopedist who specializes in scoliosis treatment. Then, like Linda said, I would document her curve progression (or lack thereof) for the next couple or few years.

My daughter is now 18yrs old and was diagnosed with idiopathic scoliosis on her 13th birthday. She has a lumbar curve of about 40 degrees. Her next annual checkup is Aug 31. We'll be discussing options, especially if her curve has progressed since her last checkup.

Being active and physically fit is one of the best ways to help your body support the spine. The stronger the abdominal muscles and side and back muscles are, the more supported your spine will be. That doesn't mean it will stop the curve from progressing, if its a progressive curve, but it means her body will be healthier and free from most discomfort that some scoliosis patients have. Remember that all scoliosis patients are unique - no two are alike. What may work for one isn't necessarily the right answer for another. Having a doc/surgeon who understands this is your first step in making sure you give her the best treatment and care. Good luck to you.

harr321
08-25-2004, 02:31 PM
Thanks for your input, this forum has helped me alot.

Bill's mom
08-31-2004, 02:23 PM
I just wanted to share our most recent experience to let you know that other things are sometimes affected by the scoliosis - things that we can't see on the outside - and as much as we dread it (and boy, do I fear and dread his upcoming surgery), surgery is needed.

My son is 15, his scoliosis was discovered in June, and he is scheduled for surgery in November. His curve is an S and his curves are 53 and 28. He is not in pain and unless you really look you can't even tell that he has a curve. He is absolutely fine with how things are now.

Because he has asthma we went to a pulmonologist two weeks ago. We were amazed to learn that the scoliosis is affecting his lungs. One lung is definitely being pushed aside due to the curvature and the other one is trying to compensate. We were shocked, but it absolutely confirmed for us that surgery was the solution.

Best of luck as you try to figure out what comes next.

Bill's mom
08-31-2004, 02:32 PM
I just wanted to share our most recent experience to let you know that other things are sometimes affected by the scoliosis - things that we can't see on the outside - and as much as we dread it (and boy, do I fear and dread his upcoming surgery), surgery is needed.

My son is 15, his scoliosis was discovered in June, and he is scheduled for surgery in November. His curve is an S and his curves are 53 and 28. He is not in pain and unless you really look you can't even tell that he has a curve. He is absolutely fine with how things are now.

Because he has asthma we went to a pulmonologist two weeks ago. We were amazed to learn that the scoliosis is affecting his lungs. One lung is definitely being pushed aside due to the curvature and the other one is trying to compensate. We were shocked, but it absolutely confirmed for us that surgery was the solution.

Best of luck as you try to figure out what comes next.

derxz
08-31-2004, 08:27 PM
i've been a competitive swimmer since 4th grade, so my abs and back muscles as well as other have been well fit. I was diagnosed in 9th grade. I wore a brace until the end of 10th grade when i needed surgery, 70 degree curve. The scoliosis surgery was not all that bad, i had it during the summer, so one month of my summer was basically cancelled. I never had back pain prior and rarely do now. I still have been incredibly physically active until my accident 5 weeks ago. Weight training, Tennis, Running, Swimming. The scholiosis hasn't affected my training in one bit. This all will depend where her curve is. Really, the lower portion of your back does all the bending, from the L2 and below. So as long as it's not below there i wouldn't worry about her flexibility. 50 degrees is pretty large compared to a normal spine. If this progresses, which it probablly will if it's that far already, it will require surgery. Go talk to another ortho doctor and get a second opinion if you'd like. Just make sure you have frequent check ups. Good luck, Derek