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caliber
12-28-2008, 07:10 PM
What limitations do you have a year after surgery? Never to lift more than 15 pounds again? How does one move, go to the grocery store? Please share your no limitations or limitations with me as I try to make a difficult decision of surgery or no surgery. Tell me what has happened to you within the year or after the year you had surgery. I am to be fused C7 to L1 . I have a 50 degrees kyphosis.

LindaRacine
12-28-2008, 09:36 PM
I have a page on my website that you might find helpful:

http://www.scoliosislinks.com/PostSurgActivities.htm

JenniferG
12-29-2008, 12:41 AM
A very helpful list!

titaniumed
12-29-2008, 02:21 AM
Linda

I have not seen this chart. Wow, it explains some things.Of course I have noticed the column for adults fused to the sacrum which includes me.

Right off the bat, Sitting for me was a tough thing after surgery, I mean like 3 minutes max. I didn't have to ask my surgeon,my body would tell me what I could do. It was about 2 weeks before I could sit more than 10 minutes. 4 weeks for 20 minutes. 8weeks for 30 minutes.

Loading the dishwasher they have 6 months indicated. I remember that being an issue that forced me to squat immediately.

Running. Never. Not that I go and run everywhere! LOL I can run alright if I have to. 300 feet max sprint.

Skiing and Motorcycling. I suspected and already knew that a crash was out of the question. I will ask why those long screws were driven into my pelvis at my 1 yr check coming up here next month. Due to my history with extreme sports, I'm wondering if that decision was based on an assumption that I might go and try something wild again? I look at everyone's x-rays and I haven't seen any long pelvic screws like mine. Have you or anyone ever seen screws like that?
Am I the only one?

Being athletic and young at heart is really testing me here lately. I sold 3 motorcycles and surrendered my plates on my 4 wheel drive to keep me from storm skiing and a little safer. I will never stop thinking about this. Powder skiing is heaven.

Sorry for unloading.Thanks for the link

Good news for Horseback riders anyway, its called an impact jacket. For $395, not a bad idea.

http://www.impactjackets.com/operations.html

Regards
Ed

Pooka1
12-29-2008, 08:14 AM
Good news for Horseback riders anyway, its called an impact jacket. For $395, not a bad idea.

http://www.impactjackets.com/operations.html


Interesting product but I suspect that more people injure their back from poor technique, especially at sit trot, than get injured falling off or even being thrown. And the only solution to poor technique is hundreds and hundreds of quality lessons and thousands and thousands of wet saddle blankets. It's why they say it takes two life times to learn to ride well and it only being a very mild exaggeration.

Dressage is the most intrinsically difficult thing I have ever attempted. It is more difficulty for me than staying in a marriage long-term, getting a doctorate, raising happy kids COMBINED. Those things are pieces of cake compared to dressage.

debbei
12-29-2008, 09:55 AM
At my 6 or 7 week checkup, Dr. Neuwirth said that short of downhill skiing or any other contact sport, I was free to do anything. After that is when I started to drive. I do go to the grocery store, but don't carry the bags back into the house. That's what teenagers are for!

I'm about 2.5 months post op now, and I've been doing laundry for over a month now. I find my grabber very handy to pick up stuff off the laundry room floor. I have the teenage boys drag the clothes up and down the stairs.

I've been loading/unloading the dishwasher since about 1 month post op. Even when my parents were staying with mme, I couldn't just lay around here and do nothing, so I found ways to do things differently. I'm sure you will too.

titaniumed
12-29-2008, 03:15 PM
Sharon

I remember riding in Golden,Co back in 1981. It was English saddle on a good horse indoors. Lessons for an hour, and very slight knee squeezes. Of course I had coaching from the side and had total control over this horse. It was amazing. I had him dealing cards!

Now Nevada has horses. I rode about 15 yrs ago western and the pelvic tilt and the bouncing was a little too much for me. I was really twisted down low pre-surgery and the pain was incredible. So I have been afraid of the pain and have neglected to just go and talk to them for hours. Kinda like a Mr Ed thing. Anybody remember that show?

Anyway, since I'm doing so well, It probably wouldn't be a bad idea to get involved in riding since I love horses. Of course we would have to have a mutual understanding first. If that horse doesn't do comedy, or deal cards, I'm not getting on him.

I think that the air bag needs to expand to about 10 feet dia and be really soft! Like a Macys day parade balloon!
Something with some bounce to it, to absorb the shock. I guess that's not a good idea, if a car hit me I would fly quite some distance.

Oh well
Ed

JenniferG
12-29-2008, 03:17 PM
Do you squat or bend to unload the dishwasher, Debbe?

I am going to be fused to the sacrum and the only things I am hoping to eventually be able to do are kayaking and play with my grandkids. Gardening would be nice too. Notice I'm not excited about doing housework, but I guess that should be on my list too.:o

I am prepared to give up a year if necessary but if I'm able/allowed to do any of those sooner, I'll be very happy.

debbei
12-29-2008, 04:54 PM
Jennifer,

I squat to load/unload the dishwasher. Housework isn't on my top priority list either--again--that's what teenagers are for!! LOL I think once I go back to work and finances are a little better, I'll get a cleaning lady once per week, which I haven't had in 5 years.

Pooka1
12-29-2008, 05:23 PM
Kinda like a Mr Ed thing. Anybody remember that show?

I remember that show. You and I are about the same age. I understand they put peanut butter on that horse's roof of the mouth to make him move his mouth like he was talking.

My horse Pete and I have an effective non-verbal communication going. He gives me the "look" that says, "If I'm so damn good, where the heck is my treat?" So I'm having to give him a carrot quite a bit. Just being able to move the worldwide price of carrots a little is about the right level of treating for Pete. :)


Anyway, since I'm doing so well, It probably wouldn't be a bad idea to get involved in riding since I love horses. Of course we would have to have a mutual understanding first. If that horse doesn't do comedy, or deal cards, I'm not getting on him.

I think that the air bag needs to expand to about 10 feet dia and be really soft! Like a Macys day parade balloon!
Something with some bounce to it, to absorb the shock. I guess that's not a good idea, if a car hit me I would fly quite some distance.

Oh well
Ed

Those are good thoughts. :D

Some more ideas would include getting lessons on a draft cross or other horse that is known to have very smooth gaits. Horse differ greatly in this regard. Some are moving sofas where you have to expend energy to fall off and others have so much suspension that you better have abs of steel to sit that (and enough Polygrip if you have dentures). :D The ones with suspension and great gaits are highly prized by good riders and command extra money. Amateurs tend to prefer the smoother horses.

Good luck. I hope you post pictures if you ride!

sharon

vndy
12-29-2008, 08:07 PM
I am a year post op, and cleared to do anything and everything. My doctor said nothing is off-limits. I traveled for the first time 2 months post-op, jet-skiied (slowly) about 6 months post-op. To be honest, the thing that was the hardest was dancing, until about 10 months post-op, because after not moving normally for so long, I was stiff and awkward! I'm going to go skiing for the first time post-op on Thursday :)

Good luck.

LynnMarie74
12-29-2008, 08:59 PM
I have a page on my website that you might find helpful:

http://www.scoliosislinks.com/PostSurgActivities.htm

Linda...you were holding out on me! LOL Kidding! Really tho, this was very helpful. Answered a bunch of my lingering questions......this is the best web site ever!!! My husband is actually getting jealous of my time spent on here!! Thanks to everyone who has helped thus far!!!

titaniumed
12-29-2008, 09:55 PM
People probably think "Where does Ed get his ideas?" Well folks, I grew up watching 1960 television!

Sharon, It was a little more than just peanut butter you know!

Mr Ed has permission to slide into home plate!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVm-HwAkVp8

Pooka1
12-30-2008, 07:22 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mister_Ed

The peanut butter legend

It is often said the crew was able to get Mister Ed to move his mouth by applying peanut butter to his gums in order for him to try to remove it by moving his lips. However, Alan Young admitted in 2004 that he had started that story himself, and explaining the actual method used.[6] Alan Young, in an interview 7 April 2007 on radio station 3AW, Melbourne, Australia, again admitted that a loose piece of Nylon was inserted under Mr. Ed's lip which the horse attempted to remove on his trainers cue. Mr. Ed was so well trained that the insert would be ignored until the required cue.

Careful examination of Mister Ed footage shows indisputable evidence that the "marionette theory" (i.e., Ed's handler pulled strings to make him talk) was at work at least some of the time. Excerpts exist from a few episodes where the lighting and camera angle reveal a visible nylon "bit" being pulled for each word Ed spoke.[citation needed] Alan Young denied this occurred in the radio interview mentioned in the above paragraph. Some may claim a nylon bit was needed in order to have Ed turn his head or perform some other movement without his trainer having to be in the camera shot, but the evidence is clear that the bit was also used when Ed was standing still and merely had to talk. Young finally admitted during his interview for the Archive of American Television that a string was pulled to make Ed talk, noting that "this is for the Archive, right?" before explaining that he'd used the peanut butter fable for years in radio interviews instead of telling the truth.

fierceliketiger
12-30-2008, 09:12 AM
Titaniumed, I have super long screws in my pelvis too...I am exactly 4 weeks out from the last surgery, so I still have 2 more weeks until my check up. I will ask too, as to why they used them. Maybe it is because of age. I am 23, and was pretty active before, so maybe they did think we were going to go nuts after the surgery. haha. :p

titaniumed
12-30-2008, 01:24 PM
Sara

Welcome!
I see you had a two part op with a 3 week separation. Wow! Mine was 2 days, and they only woke me up for 2 minutes after my anterior, then out for a week. I wonder why your Doc waited the 3 weeks? You must have been pretty corked down low like me. I sure would like to see your x-rays. Get a disc burned at the Doctors office, the quality is so much better.Mine is on my first thread.

You should start to feel better soon. My improvements seemed to be staged 20% bumps. My first 20% bump of improvement was at 1 month, then at 2 months, another 20% and so on. Your only 23 so instead of being a drugged kitty cat, you ought to return to being fierceliketiger here real soon! LOL

You might have noticed that I like to sidetrack and liven things up to keep things interesting, and add Mr Ed videos and things like that. It helps to have a positive attitude, and laugh through life.

One of the things you can do is get copies of your hospital reports from the hospital. Its neat to read through, and you will find info that they didn't tell you. I found out so many things from mine, 150 pages worth.

Keep walking and squatting!!! Use ski poles for walking, you don't want a dog to knock you down. No falling allowed now.


Sharon

Just wondering what suggestions you might have on horses with smooth gaits? Of course I want a Cadillac, and he will have to be able to slide into home plate! LOL

Caliber

I hope we helped answer your question as to limitations a year after surgery. Its the first couple of months that you have to worry about. Yes it is a difficult decision, and scary. It took me 33 years. Keep reading and posting and watch videos,
no not Mr Ed, scoliosis videos! LOL

Ed

Pooka1
12-30-2008, 03:58 PM
I suggest you look for gaited horses that are meant for easy riding. So Tennessee walkers, Missouri Fox Trotter, Mangalarga Marchadors (if you can find one), etc. Also pacers off the track.

All are very smooth or meant to be.

http://www.gaitedhorses.net/

sharon

Snoopy
12-30-2008, 05:57 PM
Ed,

I've always wondered why some doctors use a ton of screws and some use only a few. And still others don't use any. In my daughter's case, her pedicles were too small to use screws so she only has hooks and wires. She is fused from T3-L2 and after her one year mark, she was released to do everything except bungy jump and her doctor strongly recommended she not use a trampoline. He hates trampolines and wishes everyone would stop using them, but he didn't outright tell her she couldn't jump on them. Anyway, one of the questions she asked while planning surgery was how long she would be out of hunting, swimming and riding our 4-wheeler. His answer to all of them was one year and she's returned to all of them. Now granted, she is a 17 y.o. girl and doesn't get too crazy on the 4-wheeler, but she rides it in the mountains without any problems, aches, or pains.

So, maybe cycles aren't totally out of your future? :D

Mary Lou

titaniumed
12-30-2008, 08:35 PM
Mary Lou

I have quite a rack of screws, in fact there are 2 for each vert from T2 all the way down except for T6. On that level there is only 1 screw. In the hospital report it explains that a clear trajectory was not obtainable. I'm sure that when it comes to screw placement, if there isn't a clear shot, they wont go for it. Just too dangerous. I'm sure that's one of the reasons why they skip levels. It is up to the surgeon to decide what hardware to use. There is a thread on hooks and screws that was done about a month ago and there is some good info and links on that subject.

The trampoline is extra dangerous because an accident can happen on every jump. So, a possibility of a crash every second ! I don't blame him. Its all about odds. All it takes is one crash.

Being an adrenaline junky means taking things up to redline and backing off just a tad. Remember "the need for speed?"
well, that's my problem. I've always had those tendencies, and have mellowed a little but not enough. The difference between the trampoline crash and a motorcycle crash differs by about 40 mph. Now I've ridden motocross, supermoto,and street quite a bit since age 6 and haven't crashed since age 16 but I will say I've had my close calls. Oh yeah, all motorcyclists do. I guess the 80 MPH 1/2 mile wheelies are over! I've ridden well, I'm still here, but once again, all it takes is one crash.

Guess what? its the same story with skiing. After 47 years of hard skiing, (and no I don't go into the lodge) I've had my share of equipment breaking crashes! I've been in 4 slides, they happen quite a bit out here, made it on ESPN, heli skied in British Columbia, and have always skied in the worst of storms, that's when the snow is best. I guess the cliff jumps are over. I've skied well, I'm still here, but once again, all it takes is one crash.

I consider powder up to my neck the perfect depth, and I thank the Lord for my success and surgical outcome and for answers to all of my deep snow prayers through the years.

This video will help explain.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGd4jatccUM&feature=related

Ed

titaniumed
12-31-2008, 02:48 AM
Caliber

Here is a good video with anterior kyphosis info.
http://www.uwtv.org/programs/displayevent.aspx?rid=9382


I like the film "Surgery saved my life" with Br Boachie. It shows the magnitude of scoli surgeries, and had quite an impact with me. After seeing this film, I thought long and hard and was part of my decision making process. The last time I looked on the Hospital for Special Surgery site, it was not available online for free anymore. Its a Discovery production that can be bought online, or ordered over the phone.

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/surgery-saved-my-life-jumas-spine/4177085184

Any Kyphosis posties want to contribute vids or support for caliber. She is stepping up to the batters plate.

maybe caliber, you should start a new thread asking for kyphosis info, or use search

Lotsa folks on Christmas Vacation right now, anybody out there?

Regards
Ed

Snoopy
12-31-2008, 05:34 AM
Ed,

You are simply NUTS! :D It is probably better if you stay off the motorcycles and skies, because I doubt you'll avoid a crash for the rest of your life. We both know that eventually, that need for speed will catch up with you and you'lll be back to your normal craziness.

My husband ended up with two compression fractures in his back from a dirtbike accident. I never told him he had to sell his cycle because I knew how important it was to him,--he rode weekly in old coal mines and also raced 4-wheelers-- but wisely he chose to sell the dirtbike. It diddn't last for long. He just had to ride. He bought a big 4-wheeler with the explanation that he needs it to drag his deer out of the woods during hunting season. Yeah, right. I knew better. I'm just grateful that he isn't riding in the coal mines anymore. My heart is getting to old for the stress of waiting for him to get home and make sure he is in one piece!

You know what the surgery/recovery was like, so I'm sure you'll make wise choices. Maybe you could take up ceramics or knitting? lol

Mary Lou

Snoopy
12-31-2008, 05:38 AM
Caliber,

My daughter was fused from T3-L2 for her Scoliosis of 46* and Kyphosis of 71*. However, she was 13 y.o. at the time of surgery so her recovery was probably different from what an adult's would be, but let me know if you'd like details of her surgery/recovery.

Mary Lou

fierceliketiger
12-31-2008, 03:50 PM
Hmm, squatting. I'm not allowed yet. I've seen a ton of people mention that they've been squatting to grab things. My surgeon says no squatting because people tend to lean forward when they squat.

loves to skate
01-01-2009, 11:33 AM
Squatting is also bad for your knees according to my Doctor. Best to go down on one knee.

titaniumed
01-01-2009, 05:18 PM
Mary Lou and Scoli friends

I figured I would use that video to show what kind of skiing I'm talking about. Hope that everyone can see that even with a great surgical outcome, there are sacrifices. We all sacrifice something. I have sacrificed a lot!!! All of these possible sacrifices need to be weighed out in the decision making process. Running into major surgery is not something to be taken lightly. Its not something one should consider without very careful thought and all questions need to be addressed.

I know I'm going to sound like Warren Miller here, but skiing is the best sport. There's never the same conditions, never the same run, more acceleration than on any motorized vehicle, if you free fall, you go from 0 to 80MPH in about 4 seconds. When you ski in deep powder, you are floating. Its so serene,and tranquil. To be on the mountain and experience this is beyond words. Yes, its called powder on the brain! a terrible addiction. An addiction that we hard core skiers will pursue no matter what costs. We alter our lifestyle, our jobs, our living arrangements, our vehicles etc for skiing. We watch the weather and get exited when a monster storm is headed our way. We know where the deepest snow is. We book ski vacations and try to plant the date just right (Feb15th to March 15th) and pray that the snow will fall when we are there. We hop on helicopters in snow storms,and fly through mountain passes, even though we are afraid of flying.

If you don't start skiing this year, you will be one year older when you do.

Maybe it is NUTS!

Its funny how when my back would be hurting pre season, I always knew that when I would ski on a regular basis that the exercise would strengthen all my muscle systems and I believe it or not , would feel so much better. My body would turn to STEEL, and well anyway, I've attached a pic of me back in the old days.

Oh no, thats Fabio! Damn that guy! LOL
well anyway, you get the idea
Happy New Year
Ed

Pooka1
01-01-2009, 05:56 PM
I have sacrificed a lot!!

After seeing that video, I believe it. I didn't realize a person could ski in snow that deep. How do you see any buried rocks and such?


I know I'm going to sound like Warren Miller here, but skiing is the best sport. There's never the same conditions, never the same run, more acceleration than on any motorized vehicle, if you free fall, you go from 0 to 80MPH in about 4 seconds. When you ski in deep powder, you are floating. Its so serene,and tranquil. To be on the mountain and experience this is beyond words. Yes, its called powder on the brain! a terrible addiction. An addiction that we hard core skiers will pursue no matter what costs. We alter our lifestyle, our jobs, our living arrangements, our vehicles etc for skiing. We watch the weather and get exited when a monster storm is headed our way. We know where the deepest snow is. We book ski vacations and try to plant the date just right (Feb15th to March 15th) and pray that the snow will fall when we are there. We hop on helicopters in snow storms,and fly through mountain passes, even though we are afraid of flying.

I know you are going to find this hard to believe but I think the evidence is there that riding is as addictive as skiing. ;)

I could list a very large number of sacrifices, personal and career, that folks I know have made in order to feed their riding addiction. It's overpowering whether you are galloping a course or riding upper level dressage movements in collection using just a small area of your lower abdomen to control a 1300 pound horse's movement. I think it is at least in the running for most addictive sport. Certainly I don't know how to quit it. :cool:

titaniumed
01-01-2009, 07:49 PM
Sharon

Boy, I've been having problems with attachments here lately! honestly, I don't know where Fabio came from! LOL

The base depths really need to be running 10feet minimum to go off piste. It usually takes till mid January. Its not the rocks so much, its the logs under the snow that you really have to worry about. A ski or board will deflect off a rock. If your ski tip goes under a log and hooks, you will go flying. I've had crashes in deep powder that take 1 hour to recover from and its a real workout.

I actually had a first happen to me in March 2006. Since you are basically balancing and constantly adjusting your attitude,if you lean forward just a little too much, your tips will get pulled down and anchor. I flew out of my bindings, as if diving off a diving board and flew about 30 feet above the snow and dove into the snow like in a pool, and I tunneled oh probably about another 30 feet under the snow. I could see the snow rushing by my goggles and then eventually stopped,and yes it was white! I stood up, and looked back up the hill and the snow was undisturbed. In other words, I bored my own hole, like a mole.

It was the true meaning of "holey moley"

Seeing can be a problem and also breathing. I've actually choked while skiing and have had to hold my breath till the end of the run. Its just part of the sport, if the snow is deep, who really needs to see anything or breathe? Those are minor things. The major things are whacking into trees.Snow settles and it settles fast depending on water content and temps.When its cold, under 29 degrees F and snowing , its light. After time it settles and can have the consistency like cement. One of the rules is, 48 hours max for off piste after a storm, Sonny Bono was out there (off piste) on the 3rd day.

I have to say thanx for the horse link, and yes I found a Tennessee to ride locally. And I do have friends that admit to all that's involved with their horses. They are a little concerned about letting me ride with my surgery and all, but I'm sure it will be ok. Don't worry, I will have a long talk with that horse first.

Ed

Pooka1
01-01-2009, 08:23 PM
Sharon

Boy, I've been having problems with attachments here lately! honestly, I don't know where Fabio came from! LOL

I'd like to see a photo of you up to your neck in powder. :)


(snip)
I actually had a first happen to me in March 2006. Since you are basically balancing and constantly adjusting your attitude,if you lean forward just a little too much, your tips will get pulled down and anchor. I flew out of my bindings, as if diving off a diving board and flew about 30 feet above the snow and dove into the snow like in a pool, and I tunneled oh probably about another 30 feet under the snow. I could see the snow rushing by my goggles and then eventually stopped,and yes it was white! I stood up, and looked back up the hill and the snow was undisturbed. In other words, I bored my own hole, like a mole.

It was the true meaning of "holey moley"

Damn, Ed. That's as bad as getting thrown from a horse. Actually, I think skiing like you are talking is much more dangerous than riding.


(snip)Snow settles and it settles fast depending on water content and temps.When its cold, under 29 degrees F and snowing , its light. After time it settles and can have the consistency like cement. One of the rules is, 24 hours max for off piste after a storm, Sonny Bono was out there (off piste) on the 3rd day.

And Michael Kennedy was just playing football on skis, yes?


I have to say thanx for the horse link, and yes I found a Tennessee to ride locally. And I do have friends that admit to all that's involved with their horses. They are a little concerned about letting me ride with my surgery and all, but I'm sure it will be ok. Don't worry, I will have a long talk with that horse first.

You'll like the TWH. Most are sweetie pies. I just hope the horse wasn't sored or stacked or anything else that certain Walker people do to torture their poor horses. These people are so despicable they have their "own" law protecting their horses from their owners...

"The 1970 Horse Protection Act [2], created specifically to stop such practices and to monitor the TWH in particular, prohibits the use of soring agents."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_Walking_Horse#Soring

Good luck.

sharon

ps. How about less Fabio adn more you skiing? :)

titaniumed
01-01-2009, 10:15 PM
Sharon

Now I'm going to have to dig out some photos and scan them. I do have one pic scanned of me at Donner summit about 8 years ago. That's Donner lake behind me, Northstar ski area upper right which is the north end of Lake Tahoe. The Donner party had their little mishap down there, and before the railroad came through back in 1868, they hauled the horses and wagons up with ropes through the cliffs behind me. We have a ton of history out here with the Comstock, it fueled San Francisco, and financed the Civil war for Lincoln. The history of the United States would have been different without the gold from Virginia City.

Skiing isn't really all that dangerous as long as you know the rules. There has been increased awareness here lately and there are guys having problems every day. One of the freeskiers at Squaw Valley died last week in a slide that drug him through the trees. Its a shame, he was 21. Usually its the wide open steep areas that you have to worry and constantly look over your shoulder. Knowledge about snow conditions is essential, and staying up on the spines, not in the troughs is wise. I believe the Kennedy death was a non powder event.

I had no idea that anyone could do something like soring for training purposes.I was going to try to end this post with something jovial,however its hard for me to do after reading something like this.

The Fabio pic was for the ladies. I figured someone would have given this thread a 5 star rating by now!

Ed

Pooka1
01-02-2009, 12:51 PM
It reminded me a bit of Lake Louise in Banff which ranks among the most beautiful places I have ever seen. I lived in Calgary a few years ago.

Sorry to have brought the TWH torture issue to your attention but folks need to know so they don't even inadvertently enable these cretins who sore horses. It's a bad problem.

Fabio photos won't get any stars out of me. Something like this would...

http://www.superiorequinesires.com/stallions/olympicferro.htm

Snoopy
01-02-2009, 05:59 PM
Ed,

Let me say again....you are nuts! I watched the video. And now I understand that you will never return to your normal activities. Yes, you can ski again and ride motorcycles, but it won't be the same. When you are use to going 80 mph, going 20 mph seems like you are standing still. What a huge sacrifice you've made. With the activities you were use to doing, I know you didn't just jump into having surgery.

Just curious, what does your mom say about your crazy activities? I know when my husband raced motorcycles and my brother and nephews raced go-carts and race cars, my mom went crazy with worry. Maybe now your mom can rest easy and not worry about you so much?

Mary Lou

titaniumed
01-03-2009, 02:25 AM
Sharon

I was up in Banff in 1995 and skied at Lake Louise, Sunshine, and Panorama. Great place, very scenic, and elk everywhere! I walked into the expansive dining room at the Lake Louise hotel, BTW which was empty at the time, and a waiter came over and I said "heres Johnny"
You know, "The shining" well anyway, comedy takes effort. I think that if I ever go back, I would stay at the Banff Springs hotel. That's the big castle up there. Great food.

Poor Fabio getting beat out by a horse. And absolutely no responses from anyone about that here on this forum. I don't believe it! I have to admit, Olympic Ferro sure has class!! Damn. And can he dance! What a show off! He would probably deal me a blackjack every hand!

Mary Lou

The surgeons wanted to do a Luque wire operation on me in April 1974 when I was 16. That was when it was discovered by x-ray. I noticed I was having problems doing sit-ups when I was 10. I would lean to the left side coming up. I also noticed the bump on my lower left side and was wondering what that was.It was my spine!

That was back when technology was peaking. They just invented the bic lighter, and ALL the engineers were smoking like freightrains at Nasa down in Houston,(they had good reason) and the preferred mode of transport was the Chevy Vega. I decided to wait. That was 34 years ago. I knew all the time I would have my day, and my Chiros kept me going. Its like maintaining an old car, you have to keep putting brakes on and tuning them up, or go for the fancy model and hope for the best.

I've done Chiropractic,Osteopathic,Acupuncture,Acupressure,V ertical traction on treadmill,Inversion boots,Stretching,Copes,(Bad Kitty)
Bracing,Masseuses, Big and small,Hot water,Infra rub,Ocean therapy,Scuba diving, and rubber ducky!

My parents were skiers, and the lady that taught me is 85 and on her 82nd season. She skis Gunstock in New Hampshire to this day.
We walked up the hill all day long. The lift ticket was free. That was back in 1962. Ahh, the good old days of burning through a pair of gloves in one day on the rope tow.

Ed

titaniumed
01-04-2009, 04:34 PM
In continuing with Cherie's thread topic of "limitations a year after surgery", I would like to contribute on the topic of 'rock crawlers",(which I know most of the ladies here are interested in) LOL, and back muscles. I have a friend who is addicted to this 'expensive hobby" and I usually tag along on trips on the infamous "Rubicon trail" up by Tahoe and the "sierra trek". The whole idea in this 'method of madness' is to get from point "A" to point "B' through the roughest terrain possible, which includes climbing rock boulders the size of pick-up trucks.

Just last week I was invited to go and I was really wondering how I was going to hold up. I mentioned that with my back and all that there was this possibility that I might have to bail and I didn't know "when?' Anyway, I went and in the beginning of the trip, with the pitch and yaw of the vehicle, my back muscles went into overtime. Just like the trip home after surgery,the tension and flexion of each and every muscle, (the imbalanced muscles that "are" working) was something that had me a little worried. We left on our little trek last week and
in the beginning, it was a little overbearing for the first 30 minutes, then after those muscles tensed up, it wasn't all that consuming. I was also wondering like always if "this test" was something I was going to have to pay for later, like the "tests' of post scoliosis recovery'.

At my six month appointment with my surgeon, I asked him about the uneasy feeling I have with the muscles that run over my rods and screws in my mid back, and he just said"it will improve in time". I just knew in his eyes that he had all this information that he wanted to convey, but probably didn't want to repeat himself, or had tons of things on his mind. It was that "knowing look" that transferred confidence to me, that had me reassured, and he hasn't ever been wrong with his statements.(A good surgeon is a perfectionist, and one who has problems with mistakes. Its a heavy burden)

In my recovery, after having been sliced and diced over 2 days front and back, and experiencing a 9 day illus,(that's a shutdown of the guts folks!) and Oh, I almost forgot, my shoulder was also broken. Upon coming home in record time after 11 days, I was a little beat up. The atrophy of all my muscles, and I mean ALL, kept me in quite a lethargic state. My body was saying to my brain, "what the hell are you doing up there" your killing me down here. After time, the body repairs itself, and what exercise it can get can promote the circulation of blood and oxygen to the areas that are needed. Walking is the preferred method of achieving this action of self repair, and its of great benefit. Only after 6 months or so, did I start the finalizing process of strengthening those muscles that needed just a little bit more.

Like a karate expert who wants to chop wooden planks with his hand, there is a toughening process that they have to go through. Or a guitar player with calluses, or a drummer with all the hand stuff they go through, I'm finding that my muscles in my back are now getting built up and quite a bit tougher and the balancing is evening out now. I went yesterday on another 4 wheeling trek and I didn't have the sensitivity like on that first trip, I guess I'm toughening up a little bit more.

A/P scoliosis surgery is invasive. It is MAJOR surgery, and full recovery takes at least 1 year at age 50. I was also in excellent condition, with all the physical things I've done. Its best to be in tip top physical condition before surgery, no question about that!

Here is a pic of the highly modified buggy. The dents in the top are from flipping it over in the rocks. One of the favorite questions that is asked upon meeting another wheeler out in the middle of nowhere is "Got any Grey Poupon?

Ed