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gillespie
12-01-2008, 07:48 PM
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Thank you to everyone for all their support. We are home today thank god for that. Her surgery went very well they went from T2 to L2 and she was in surgery for 8 hrs (longest 8 hrs of my life) She did not have any real complications. She did have trouble with her blood O2 but got that under control last night. She needed two units of blood during surgery and for anyone who knows my car issue will understand this comment they did not use my car crash blood LOL. It was a long week and she was in so much pain it was heart breaking, but I will say what a tough girl she did everything that was asked without complaint wow. At one point one of the Dr. was concerned with how much morphine she was using so she decided on her own to stop using not a good idea nurses and I kind of forced her to use it. Did not at any point have a fever but did and is still having trouble with BM also had severe nausea so happy the nausea stopped or should I say puking!!!! The plan was to go home today if she stopped puking, stayed off O2 and pooped well she did not poop, went all night with out O2 and went all day and night yesterday without puking then this morning her so smart mother gave her oj on and empty stomach and she puked right as the resident walked in the room she was so upset cause he said he was going to keep her one more day. The nurses and I both agreed she was good to go I could give emema if she does not poop so we called her surgeon and made a deal if she kept down breakfast and lunch she could go and she did. So happy to be home I stayed with her the whole time other then the hour a day for shower at home. Now recovery!!!!!!! I am so happy to be over the worst of this and for the record you were all right I was a reck but day of surgery was exteremly scary calm. Thanks again for helping me through this.

WNCmom
12-01-2008, 08:04 PM
Congratulatons to both of you, Catherine. Sounds like the nausea was an ordeal. I was worried about BMs after we got home, but that issue resolves itself with the help of home cooking and stool softeners.

It all gets better from here--I know you're so glad to be home. Thanks for the update.

Mary Ellen

Pooka1
12-01-2008, 08:53 PM
Glad you are home. It's going to be better and better.

Best regards,
sharon

Kitty
12-02-2008, 07:54 AM
Hi Catherine,
Glad to hear Danielle is home and well. Well done to both of you - it is not easy seeing your child go through this and I know it must be a huge weight off your shoulders. She will now get better and better and you will be totally amazed at how quickly she will recover.

Thanks for keeping us informed.

Lisa

Carmell
12-02-2008, 12:54 PM
I'm very happy Danielle is home. Good to hear. The constipation/bm thing is ALWAYS an issue! I can't fathom why surgeons/nurses/etc. don't do something about this before, during and after surgery so the poor patient doesn't have to suffer!??? Makes me crazy because it CAN be an easy fix. They KNOW it's going to be a problem for most patients - why not eliminate the problem? Sheesh. Her nausea was emphasized because of the lack of bm's. When your GI system is full of stool, nausea sets in, you don't want to eat because you're already full, etc. UGH.

Done ranting. I hope being at home will help her feel even better. Lots of hugs that she continues to have a smooth and uneventful recovery.

laurieg6
12-02-2008, 02:06 PM
Congratulations on being over with Danielle's successful surgery. Probiotic supplements can help somewhat with the constipation, I've found.

I hope she has a really speedy recovery!

Kitty
12-03-2008, 08:06 AM
[QUOTE=Carmell;68118]I'm very happy Danielle is home. Good to hear. The constipation/bm thing is ALWAYS an issue! I can't fathom why surgeons/nurses/etc. don't do something about this before, during and after surgery so the poor patient doesn't have to suffer!??? Makes me crazy because it CAN be an easy fix. They KNOW it's going to be a problem for most patients - why not eliminate the problem? Sheesh. Her nausea was emphasized because of the lack of bm's. When your GI system is full of stool, nausea sets in, you don't want to eat because you're already full, etc. UGH.

Carmell, Tahlia was given laxatives fairly regularly whilst in hospital, plus they had her on nutritious supplements and high-fibre foods. They encouraged her BM as soon as she could start to eat and it was a priority for them to kickstart this process. She did end up having a supp in the beginning because she was constipated, but it all went downhill from there (no pun intended :D). I don't really understand why US hospitals let these kids go home before they're fully functioning down there!! I'm so glad i didn't have to worry about that.

BTW, Tahlia is still in hospital and looks to be heading home tomorrow. Thank God!!!

Cheerio,
Lisa

WNCmom
12-03-2008, 08:46 AM
Lisa--

Here's hoping all goes well toward Tahlia's discharge tomorrow! Glad all is going well.

Mary Ellen

Pooka1
12-03-2008, 09:20 AM
Excellent news about coming home soon, Lisa.

I bet Tahlia will quickly feel better just being home again.

In re the BM issue, I first have to qualify my comments in saying I don't recall ever talking to the surgeon while my daughter was in the hospital. My husband would bring my other daughter every day after school and I would go home for a few hours to shower and rest. The surgeon always came by at this time so my husband talked to him every day. I don't know the extent of everything they talked about. I was present at the hospital at all other times and spoke daily with the resident who assisted in the surgery as well as the nurses of course.

If there was a requirement to have a BM prior to discharge, I was unaware of it. The only requirements I recall had to do with climbing stairs and such. They completely restricted all food/drink/ice until bowel sounds were heard. After that, they gave her colase daily and brought food but didn't seem overly concerned when she didn't eat. In fact she barely ate anything and wasn't at all hungry until maybe the last day in the hospital. I have no recollection of this being on anyone's radar.

In re discharging kids before they have a BM, I'm guessing they know through experience that if certain indicators are present (bowel sounds, some eating, daily colase) that there will be no problem. I really don't know. I just know it turned out fine. And I know they get a boatload of scoliosis fusions from our surgeon through that pediatric ward per the nurses. They are batting 1000 in our one case.

Carmell
12-03-2008, 01:42 PM
Sharon,

Your story is fairly typical, as far as I know. The ONLY part that isn't enforced in many hospitals (sadly) is that many surgeons don't order Colace, or any stool softner, laxative, etc. until AFTER the patient is in pain from the constipation. My point before (too much rambling) was that patients NEED at least Colace from the beginning, not just when they start showing signs of problems. By then, it's too late. MUCH like playing "catch up" with pain meds. Don't wait (those first days/weeks) until you feel lots of pain to start taking the meds. Stay on top of it. Stay on top of the constipation problems too.

If a patients is normally a healthy, typical person, eating is probably not a big concern to the medical staff because they know once the patient is feeling better (at home, especially) their eating habits will return and it won't be a problem. We try to keep Braydon eating in the hospital (since he really can't afford to lose weight) but if he doesn't, not a big deal. They know we know to work on that at home. Drinking is very important tho. Staying hydrated, especially after an IV is removed, is critical.

So, I agree with the post-op experience you and your daughter had. Sounds typical for a healthy teenager having major surgery. I just wish ALL hospitals would take care of constipation problems BEFORE they happen.

pmsmom
12-03-2008, 05:10 PM
Glad to hear that things are working out for you and Danielle.

Continued prayers and good wishes for a speedy recovery for her!

How is she managing the pain now? Could the nausea have been from the pain meds?

I hadn't thought about what Carmell mentioned about not having a BM, then being backed up and having the nausea and vomiting--makes sense though!
Also accounts for the lack of appetite.

Congratulations to Tahlia, too! Has she already been through rehab?

I agree with Lisa--I know that recovery does go well once the children are home, but I think the US hospitals are too quick to give them the boot. Maybe that's just me trying to be overly cautious.

babachi
12-03-2008, 07:09 PM
Glad Danielle is home and well. Best wishes for a speedy recovery.

Bethany

Kitty
12-03-2008, 11:32 PM
Glad to hear that things are working out for you and Danielle.

Continued prayers and good wishes for a speedy recovery for her!

How is she managing the pain now? Could the nausea have been from the pain meds?

I hadn't thought about what Carmell mentioned about not having a BM, then being backed up and having the nausea and vomiting--makes sense though!
Also accounts for the lack of appetite.

Congratulations to Tahlia, too! Has she already been through rehab?

I agree with Lisa--I know that recovery does go well once the children are home, but I think the US hospitals are too quick to give them the boot. Maybe that's just me trying to be overly cautious.

Tahlia is now home! We came back just a few hours ago - a total of 18 days spent in hospital. However, i just want to say that it is not just US/Canada hospitals that send them home early, even hospitals on the east coast of Australia do. Anyway, she is on nothing more than panadol now and the only issue we have to contend with is her brace, which is annoying the crap out of her. Unfortunately, i think we were ushered out too soon and the orthotist was rude and obnoxious and I honestly think I would have decked her if Tahlia wasn't in the room. Because Tahlia's lung collapsed and conseuquently ended up spending a whole extra week in hospital, this delayed her arrival at rehab, therefore the orthotist had to "squeeze" her in and made us aware of it on several occasions. She told Tahlia not to be a "princess" by lying down so much and when i offered to keep her in a little longer so she could monitor the fitting of the brace (she was became agitated this morning because Tahlia wasn't sitting up and took off the brace to have a shower), she said no, she was fully booked and it would then be "your problem". Such a cow!! Anyway, so she has to wear this brace now (a poly-jacket, as they call them) and it's very uncomfortable. I allowed her to take it off for half an hour so she could lie down (and be a princess!!!! ;)) and rest.

Anyway, sorry had to vent.

Mary Ellen/Catherine - do Sidney and Danielle have to wear a brace?? Hope things are continuing to improve for them both.

Thanks all for asking after Tahlia. Apart from the brace, she is getting better and I know it will be uphill from here.

Cheers,
Lisa

Pooka1
12-04-2008, 07:35 AM
Very glad to hear Tahlia is home. You had some rough sledding. But you're on the glide path back to a normal life now.

Man, that orthotist seems to have issues. :eek:

Best regards,
sharon

WNCmom
12-04-2008, 04:25 PM
Lisa--

Sidney is not wearing a brace. He is doing well. I still worry about his posture, but it is early yet, and I am assured by others this will likely resolve over time. He is now sitting up for longer, getting in and out of bed and putting on/taking off his shoes and socks by himself, and taking longer walks each day, and in general doing more for himself. He is having a few isolated rib pains and "stitches," which I consider to be a good thing, because it tells me his muscles are starting to rearrange themselves. Today is 3 weeks post-op for him.

I'm sorry you had such a horrible experience with the orthotist. You certainly didn't need that given all you've been through. Glad you're home.

Mary Ellen

pmsmom
12-04-2008, 04:33 PM
Hooray that Tahlia is home! \ 0 / May she continue to have a great recovery!

Marian

gillespie
12-04-2008, 11:38 PM
Hi Lisa and Mary Ellen
No Danielle is not wearing a brace either. She is doing very well each day gets a little better. She is also so feeling weird pains which is just that the nerves and muscles mending. She is doing better everyday, she is able to sit up herself now and is in much better spirits. I believe the nausea was from the morphine because as soon as they stopped so did her nausea she is now on oxycodone and tylenolol 3s. She did have a bit of a break down today as she misses her friends and social life. She did have bm today after enema (she would kill me for telling you all this). I don't know why they dont just do them it was instant after suffering and stressing for a week and a half. Lisa I know all to well how arrogant and rude some medical professionals can be it is frustrating and they do have to be reminded sometimes that they are only human. Danielles surgeon is owesome in everyway but his resident was a different story to busy to listen or care. I realized yesterday that he was about a day short for pain meds for her before her follow up called her surgeon and got repeats thank god or we would have been at the er tonight for sure. The nurses at the childrens hospital were all so kind, every shift change we would worry we were going to get a bad one but that did not happen I can not say enough about the care she received. We go tomorrow for a follow up and have the dressing removed. Lisa I can't imagine what you have gone through our experience was a good one and was still hell I feel for you but now we are on the other side and isn't it wonderful. One thing that does have me a little concerned is that her one shoulder seems to be dropped a bit will ask about that tomorrow. Take care and bye for now.

laurieg6
12-05-2008, 12:57 AM
Our orthotist was never friendly either. He was always unhappy and negative about the implications of the scoliosis and the brace.

Kitty
12-05-2008, 04:11 AM
HiCatherine,
Nice to hear from you again. I too worried about the shift changes and getting a "bad" one (LOL!!), but like you, they were all so wonderful. We had the opposite experience with our doctors - the surgeon was very short and sharp, whilst his registrars or residents (or whatever they're called :p) were pleasant and managed a smile. Whilst i don't resent our surgeon is cold mannerisms, as he is highly respected and good at what he does, it certainly did not make consulting with him easy. Don't worry, Tahlia had a supp also and it helped enormously and I think us parents need to talk about our experiences.

My journey has been scary and so has yours and others. I will be honest, though, and say that when her her lung collapsed, i began to think the worst and was SOO scared, but lung collapse or not, this is a huge operation that will have all parents fearing the worst. So I dont think that my experience has been any harder than anyone else's.

Tahlia still has half her dressings on. I have to make an appt with the GP clinic next week to have it removed. They told me the tapes curl over and then to just trim them back, but have them removed soon. I don't know why they just couldn't take them off themselves.

Laurie, thanks for that. It's nice to know we're not the only ones :)

Cheers all,
Lisa

gillespie
12-05-2008, 04:57 PM
We went for follow up today. She is completely straight 100% correction which from what I gather is rare. Her dressing was removed and looks good. We also were asked to talked to a family just beginning this journey I wish we would have had that when we were first told. We also were waiting for xrays and there were two 10 year olds that are facing surgery that I think felt better after seeing and talking to Danielle.

Carmell
12-05-2008, 06:05 PM
Catherine,

I'm very happy to hear Danielle had a great post-op appointment! Many hugs and wishes for a continued smooth recovery... She's doing great.

Kitty
12-05-2008, 06:17 PM
That's great news Catherine. I do envy you though. I don't know how much correction Tahlia has as we'll have to wait and see. However, from looking at her shoulder blades, one is still lower than the other and she still has a hump on her right side. It is noticeably lower than previously, I will admit that, but I am very saddened that it is not straight. The surgeon did tell us that he could not get a completely straight correction so we knew that going into it, but i guess you just hope. The x-rays actually look better than her actual back. And with the brace on, I have noticed that she is pretty much back to where she was when they were bracing her about 4 years ago to halt the progression. I'd say she's around 40 degrees, but that's just my untrained judgement. You can still notice the unevenness in her back and her clothes don't sit as well and I look at her and think she's gone through all of this (surgery and hospitalisation) and it still isn't straight. I haven't told the surgeon this (not that I think he'd care) as I don't want to be ungrateful, because i know there is an improvement and Tahlia feels better and is happier and it (hopefully) will halt the progression. So I am grateful for that, but when it is your child, how can you not want a completely straight spine.

Sorry. I just needed to get that out.

Glad to hear Danielle's getting better.

Lisa

Carmell
12-05-2008, 06:46 PM
Lisa,

I'm glad Tahlia is home and recovering there. I hope her recovery moves smooth and speedy now that she can rest at home.

I understand your comments about this being YOUR child and not seeing the benefits you had hoped for. I know that may weigh on you, emotionally. Try not to dwell on this, tho. Is she breathing better? That's the #1 reason why she had the surgery (internal organs needed better space to function). If this has improved, then her surgery was not in vain. I promise. She is still so soon out of surgery that you can't make too many long term judgments yet. Many patients need time to get used to their new bodies. Over the next weeks/months, hopefully she'll "settle in" to her body's new position and have better posture and better presence. However, if she doesn't, she still needs your praise and support for doing so well during and after the surgery. She needs all the self-confidence she can get. Having an 80+ degree curve is huge. Realistically, you can't expect perfection. Tahlia is perfect. The spine/curve may not be. (I know you know what I mean... not lecturing, I promise.)

I try not to think about this with Braydon. His back can't ever be normal. It wasn't "normal" to start with. Hopefully he stays healthy and strong and continues to be as balanced as possible, with an equally balanced emotional state of mind. That's what I continue to hope for.

My best you (still!) and Tahlia for a continued smooth recovery.

Kitty
12-05-2008, 07:01 PM
Hi Carmell,

Tahlia is very happy with the surgery and outcome and mentioned to me that she is no longer wheezing and breathing better, so yes that is a great outcome. Believe me, I have not lost sight of Tahlia's emotional well being here and have consistently advised her that I am very happy and that her back looks so much flatter than before and is generally better overall. She is not aware of my feelings reflected in the comments above. I am satisfied, i just wish her curve was straighter and I do feel some envy when I read (or see) about others' straighter spines post-op.

It's strange though, prior to surgery, I had fully accepted Tahlia's back for all its' curves and twists. Tahlia was just Tahlia and as you say, she was perfect and aesthetically, her back did not bother me (obviously the lung function and heart-related probelms were an issue), but i could accept it then, but am having greater difficulty now. I sense that's because perhaps my expectations following this surgery were greater than the results delivered.

Nevertheless, I will remind myself of the benefits and the potential consequences if she didn't have the surgery. I know that it would have only gotten worse and her lung function would have deteriorated.

Lisa

laurieg6
12-05-2008, 09:28 PM
I know what you mean Lisa. My son's curves are still in the low 30's and his back isn't "perfect" - but of course he, himself is, Carmell. :)

He still doesn't have perfect posture, one shoulder remains higher than the other and, unless reminded to do otherwise, he tends to lean a little forward and on one hip. However, he feels great, is so relieved and proud to be such a survivor, he's regaining his strength and he can do almost anything. It just still bothers me that with all he's been through, he still doesn't look as straight as I thought he would.

Hang in there though. Your daughter's surgery was so recent that anything is possible with regard to her posture. I'm sure her shoulders will even out somewhat, if not fully and she's still probably swollen from the surgery. When the swelling goes down, her rib hump will decrease too.

WNCmom
12-05-2008, 10:41 PM
Lisa--

I appreciate your being so up front with your feelings of disappointment. Sidney's back doesn't look straight, either--at least not yet. With all my gratitude, I am also worried that it won't "settle" and ultimately look straighter as Carmell is describing, even though a number of people have said there's a good chance it will. I'm still hoping for that, but at the same time worried it won't happen for him.

Sidney is only 13 and before surgery was less body concious than most his age. I just want HIM to be okay with how he looks, however it turns out. He can see he is not quite straight right now(he's just mentioned it once). I guess all we can do is wait and hope and accept, and support and love our children.

Just want you to know I'm understanding you...

Mary Ellen

Pooka1
12-05-2008, 11:01 PM
Catherine, very good news on the correction.

Lisa, I'll have to try to find that article again but the bottom line was that there was no difference in future back pain (and IIRC other back issues) between folks who were corrected to near straightness and those who were left with a moderate curve.

If that proves to be universally true over large populations then the larger corrections are "grandstanding." And I say that as someone whose kid was corrected down to ~5*. I won't see our surgeon until March 2009 but will try to nail this down.

Any stabilization of a curve is AMAZING in my book. Surgical fusion is the only way to stabilize a spine as far as I know. We are so lucky this treatment even exists.

sharon

Kitty
12-06-2008, 04:15 AM
Hi Mary Ellen and Laurie - thank you both for your comments. It is good to know I am not the only one who feels that way and you can both relate to how I'm feeling. I do hope that there will be continued correction with the brace. And I hope too, Mary Ellen, that Sidney's curve will straighten as well. Tahlia has looked in the mirror a couple of times and says she can actually see her back now, which is good because before she couldn't because her shoulder blade was sticking right out. I guess we just have to continue to remind them of the benefits (both aesthetically and medically) of having the surgery, regardless of how worried we continue to be.

Laurie, when did your son have his surgery?

Sharon, i'd be happy to read the article if you can find it?

Thanks,
Lisa

pmsmom
12-06-2008, 08:30 AM
Catherine and Mary Ellen, I'm happy to hear that Danielle and Sidney are doing so well!

Lisa, I am so happy for you that Tahlia is doing so well, too! She has had so many other medical issues--God bless her for what she has had to go through!

To all moms who've posted, if nothing else, I'm sure you are so proud of your children and the strength they (and you) have had through their scoliosis journeys.

Please tell them for me that I am drawing hope from all of your stories.

Marian

WNCmom
12-06-2008, 10:33 AM
Lisa--

How long does Tahlia need to wear her brace?

M.E.

Pooka1
12-06-2008, 10:56 AM
Sharon, i'd be happy to read the article if you can find it?

Thanks,
Lisa

Lisa, I found a recent review that references the article I was referring to as far as I can tell. But the review itself is a quick synopsis of the situation and might be better.

I'll post it as a new thread in case it draws discussion but it's called "How much correction is enough?" by Winter, Lonstein, and Denis. Spine 32(24):2641-2643.

sharon

Kitty
12-06-2008, 09:36 PM
Hi Mary Ellen,
I think our surgeon said 6 months, but the orthotist said about 3-4 months, so your guess would be as good as mine!!! LOL! Tahlia herself says she hopes it's just 3. :D

Thanks Marian and thank you to you Sharon, I will go and seek it out.

Cheers all,
Lisa

Carmell
12-08-2008, 01:44 PM
I didn't check the board over the weekend, but wanted to kind of clarify my comments (and apologize to anyone who was offended by what I wrote - totally not intentional, at all!).

I DO know what it's like to see your child's body and feel sad that it isn't "perfect". Maybe I have become a little callus to this over the years, watching Braydon's "very not-perfect" back and wondering if we've made the right choices for him so far. His body is not ever going to look like anyone would like it to look. He has multiple scars, a significant rib hump, a solidly fused spine (T5-L1, 65 degrees), a significantly shorter torso, one leg shorter than the other, etc. This is (so far) the outcome from having tried to give him the best QUALITY of life, and trying to keep the physical appearance as "normal" as possible. With all the abnormalities he was born with, it isn't hard to ignore the imperfections (in ignorant peoples' eyes) and realize that he is healthier than we had hoped. Medical professionals continue to tell us that had he been born even 20 years earlier, his quality of life would be drastically worse. Not my idea of fun. He really is doing great, with the body he was given.

I guess I came across a little harsh, and did not intend for that to happen. We ALL must grieve for the loss of the "perfection" we had hoped for. Once we get past that grief (and everyone must go through it, to one degree or another) then we can embrace the challenges a little easier, and give our children the best quality of life that we know.

Lisa - Tahlia is so very soon out of surgery, and your emotions are likely very high and on a huge roller coaster. I can only imagine the "discussions" you have with yourself over her medical issues. You have a very full plate - maybe you need a bigger plate? Hopefully as she continues to recover, and feeling better, you will be able to find peace in your heart and know you've done everything in your power to give her the quality of life she deserves.

Mary Ellen - I also send more cyber-hugs and wishes to you and Sidney for a continued smooth and safe and speedy recovery. I will be anxious to hear from you in about a year to see what your perspective is at that point. Lots to consider, and lots more healing to do, but in the end, I'm sure you both will be pleased.

I also think these examples are more reinforcement that EVERY scoliosis patient is different. Each one has unique circumstances and conditions. Too many variables to compare apples to apples. I'm very happy for those who seemingly breeze through surgery and recovery, and feel sad and frustrated when patients have complications and concerns. But, we have a collectively large shoulder here to lean on. I hope everyone uses it to feel uplifted and buoyed.

laurieg6
12-08-2008, 07:54 PM
Hi Carmell,

I don't think you sounded callous or harsh. I personally think you sounded sympathetic in an experienced, realistic way. You certainly know how we all feel so for me at least, a reality check never hurts. Your son has had so many surgeries so you have a broader perspective than many of us who have "only" had to go through spinal surgery once.

Hasn't Braydon had a VEPTR expansion recently? How is he doing now? Is he back in school after taking off much of last year? How is his leg/foot?

Carmell
12-09-2008, 03:37 PM
Hi Laurie,

Thanks - sometimes I'm glad to hear how my posts come across. I often write without thinking well.

Thanks for asking about Braydon. He is finally doing well. His latest expansion was Oct. 13. He had some very bad nerve pain (said all the ribs on his right side felt broken) that was hard to get rid of. A week after surgery he started taking Neurontin. Within 24 hours, there was a great improvement in pain. After about 4-5 weeks, the pain was gone. He has been on a very long road trip with Mike (hubby) and Blake (other son). They have had a great time and he hasn't called me once to say he's hurting or having a hard time. I take that as a great sign! He forgot to take his school work with him, so he's even farther behind! Silly kid. He is taking four classes at school (the core classes) and that has worked well. Anything longer than 3.5 hours is too much for him. His leg is doing well. No more pain! I like that. It was a very long year to recover from that leg surgery and infection issues. His "only" issue with the leg now is his lift/build up on his shoe isn't as good as it should be. It's too soft on the outside and causing his ankle to turn easily. He is also turning in his foot too much again. Hopefully this new lift he recently got will make a better difference.

I've been reading your little inputs about Alexander and his continued recovery. I keep hoping he's one who suddenly has an epiphany (of sorts) and is magically better with his posture and any discomfort is completely gone. It's very hard to see them when they aren't appearing the way you expect them. Hopefully as he goes through his teen years, he'll get good benefits from growing.

Take care.

WNCmom
12-09-2008, 08:06 PM
Carmell--

I, too, wanted to weigh in and say how much I appreciate your posts. They always help me see things in perspective and count my blessings, and realize how fortunate many of us are to be dealing "just" with scoliosis.

Two years ago I was telling a friend about Sidney's newly-diagnosed scoli. Just last week she emailed to say she wanted to meet and talk--her 14 yo daughter has just been diagnosed. She doesn't know the details of the curve or Risser or anything yet, because she is waiting for an appointment with a specialist. Of course, she is very worried. I hope I can be of as much of a comforting influence in her life as you are on this forum.

I'm glad to hear Braydon is doing well.

Mary Ellen

laurieg6
12-10-2008, 01:24 PM
Hi Carmell,

I'm so glad to hear that Braydon is doing better this year. That kid has been through so much and he deserves a fun time off with his dad and brother. You get some relief too. How nice!

Thanks for thinking of Alexander. Maybe you're right and growing is what he needs to be straighter. He's only grown an inch or so since the surgery so we keep expecting a growth spurt at some point in the near future. He is doing better though and does sometimes self-adjust his posture without my input.

Your wisdom, support and honesty are huge assets on these forums.

Carmell
12-11-2008, 03:39 PM
Mary Ellen,

You will be (already are) a great friend and support to many people. I can tell just by the way you write here. You have even more personal experience (being a parent is not easy anyway, but these experiences add "character" and wisdom) now to share support and strength to others who need a shoulder to lean on. Great job and many best wishes to your friend's daughter. Hearing a new diagnosis is never a simple nor easy task. Lots of deep breaths... Thanks for your nice comments - very much appreciated.