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Geish
06-14-2008, 09:36 AM
Ok...so I know this is a weird question, but can any of you post op people out there float in a pool? I tried the other day in my hot tub and discovered I list to the left side and slowly sink. I was a lifeguard for 7 years and I know that I know how to float so thats not the problem. i think my hardware is heavier on the left side so it starts sinking first. It was actually kind of funny and my sister and my daughters got a a big kick out of watching me sink. So...can you float?

Susie*Bee
06-14-2008, 10:46 AM
Interesting! When/if we get our pool opened this summer, I'll let you know what happens when I try! Glug, glug, glug! :eek:

skoshi314
06-14-2008, 10:53 AM
Alicia, as much gas as I've had this last week I could have floated like a dead fish! Seriously, I'll have to check it out once I'm cleared to submerse myself in water. Thanks for the interesting thought!

loves to skate
06-14-2008, 11:09 AM
Hi Alicia,

I was cleared for swimming about 3 months ago and the first time I went swimming, I immediately started to sink while trying to swim. I am able to swim now, but I guess I haven't even tried to just float. I doubt that I can just float and would have to keep my arms moving just to stay on top of the water. I'll try it next time I go to the pool and let you know. Sally

Suzy
06-14-2008, 02:28 PM
OMG Alicia! I thought it was just me! I tried the first summer after surgery and thought I couldn't float because I had lost 22 lbs from the surgery. I was always able to just think about floating and could do it while barely moving my arms. Wow, I just realised something....My best friend has a Harrington rod and she CAN'T float either! I spent so much time trying to teach her and thought it was because she learned to swim late in life and still isn't too comfortable in the water. I know the hardware doesn't weigh much because I asked my surgeon about it. So I wonder what the deal is. Our pool is getting close to warm enough for me so I will check again. I didn't go in the water much in the beginning because after being weightless in the pool I felt a lot of pressure on my lower back when gravity hit me. I gained back all the weight so maybe now I will float? Maybe not.........
I will let you know. Suzy

LindaRacine
06-14-2008, 03:20 PM
Hi...

I can float, and have quite a bit of stainless steel (with implants on both the front and back of my spine). I wonder if it's got to do with your being stiff and protective.

--Linda

txmarinemom
06-14-2008, 04:15 PM
I've never been able to float and keep my feet up without extra paddling (I was also a lifeguard) ...

I haven't tried floating since surgery, but (I was told) my hardware weighs about 6 oz. total: It's hard to believe the weight alone would have much effect in my case.

Both body tenseness (and I can imagine long fusions add to that) and body fat are factors that not only affect overall bouyancy, but how "far up" you float. My body fat has always been 15-16%, and I'm sure that plays a part in my "sink like a stone"-ness.

I did, however, always ROCK at "tea parties". Heh.

Both my kids, on the other hand, just pick their feet up off the bottom and go *bLoOoOoP!* to the surface. I'm curious whether Jett (my Marine), at his current body fat level (very low ... but I'm not sure how low), still floats. I'll have to ask ...

Regards,
Pam

Theresa
06-15-2008, 01:07 AM
I had the same problem. It is also very hard for me to swim!!

titaniumed
06-15-2008, 10:55 AM
In 2001, The Sun, a British tabloid newspaper reported that Queen Elizabeth II has a rubber duck in her bathroom that wears an inflatable crown. The duck was spotted by a workman who was repainting her bathroom.[1] The story prompted sales of rubber ducks in the United Kingdom to increase by 80% for a short period.

The rubber duck can be referred to informally as a "rubber duckie" or a "rubber ducky." Amongst collectors of rubber ducks, the spelling "rubber duckie" has achieved prominence, but both spellings are considered acceptable.

http://www.pricehot.com/rubberducky.html

Im a diver, I couldnt help it.

sorry

SIsForSarah
06-15-2008, 04:36 PM
Another lifeguard here (post Harrington rod surgery even!) and I've also never really been able to float. In one of my lifeguarding courses, I remember they showed us 3 body types: Endomorphs (really thin), mesomorphs (athletic, muscular) and ectomorphs (heavier) - not sure I have the words right by the way - and they explained to us that because muscle is heavier than fat or skin tissue, people with a much greater percentage of muscle to fat don't tend to float - so mesomorphs are the ones we were supposed to be scooping off the bottom of the pool :D I'm thinking metal rod may tip the balance for those who are sort of on the floater/non-floater cusp, but it's just a theory.

The other thing is your lung capacity does help you maintain some buoyancy, and if it's affected by your spine curving, you may not be able to hold in as much air.

I've actually thought about this topic way too often over the years, which is why I'm just full of theories :)

debbei
06-15-2008, 07:19 PM
In 2001, The Sun, a British tabloid newspaper reported that Queen Elizabeth II has a rubber duck in her bathroom that wears an inflatable crown. The duck was spotted by a workman who was repainting her bathroom.[1] The story prompted sales of rubber ducks in the United Kingdom to increase by 80% for a short period.

The rubber duck can be referred to informally as a "rubber duckie" or a "rubber ducky." Amongst collectors of rubber ducks, the spelling "rubber duckie" has achieved prominence, but both spellings are considered acceptable.

http://www.pricehot.com/rubberducky.html

Im a diver, I couldnt help it.

sorry

BWHAAAAHAAAAAHAAA!!!! :D :D

titaniumed
06-15-2008, 07:53 PM
Thank you Debbie. I was wondering who was going to respond first! Comedy takes effort, and its tough without a response.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiaHZW4GAyM

With all this serious scoli stuff I figured Id inject a little cheer for fathers day!

toast to the Queen!

Oh by the way, I went swimming today!

ecnw
06-15-2008, 08:12 PM
I have a herrington rod and can float. I do have one side that floats higher, but I thought that's because I'm female with more floatation on top!
Emily

Susie*Bee
06-15-2008, 08:33 PM
Emily-- that was funny! :D

T.ed-- your post made me think of a recent (2005) Eric Carle storybook (children's author)-- called 10 Little Rubber Ducks based on a newspaper article he had read. Here's a review:

"The inspiration for Eric Carle's new book 10 Little Rubber Ducks came from the true story of a shipment of rubber ducks and other bathtub toys that fell overboard and washed up on shores all around the world. Illustrated in his painted tissue paper collage, 10 Little Rubber Ducks is told in simple, rhythmic language and bright, colorful pictures that capture the magical voyage of a group of rubber ducks lost at sea and their encounters with creatures who live in and around the ocean. A tender ending that includes a surprise will satisfy readers of all ages." (Reviews)

When I first read about it, I thought it was such fun to think of! :D

Thanks for sharing! ;)

titaniumed
06-16-2008, 02:18 PM
Emily

Flotation is a good thing! I try not to think about it too much, as it can get me into trouble.


Ed

Pooka1
06-16-2008, 03:51 PM
Hey Ed, you're quite the comedian!

The children's book blurb that Susie*Bee posted reminded me of a review someone posted on Amazon about the children's book, "Goodnight Moon" that I thought was pretty good...

---------

Riveting! A Thriller!, October 6, 1998
Reviewer: Anne from Worcester, MA

Once again Margaret Wise Brown proves herself the mistress of the macabre in this daring tale of suspense. The riveting plot concerns a child-rabbit held hostage in a mysterious room by a seemingly benign yet omnipresent 'old lady'. Is she a threat or merely a representation of the authority figure we all resent yet are powerless to battle.? Perhaps, even, God?

The victim is fighting to stay awake after, it is implied, being forcibly fed 'a bowl full of mush'. Vermin running rampant and nightmarish surreal paintings of wild animals add to the atmosphere of horrifying menace.

Although less complex than her other subjects (stalking in 'Runaway Bunny' and homelessness in 'A Home For A Bunny'). Ms. Brown is obviously at her zenith with this page turner. You won't want to put it down...just keep the lights on! --This text refers to the Board book edition.

----------

loves to skate
06-17-2008, 02:04 PM
Just tried to float today. Nope, I can't do it and I used to be able to.
Sally

Singer
06-17-2008, 02:43 PM
I can tread water but I have a mortal fear of getting horizontal in the water....I'm afraid I'll break in two, I suppose.....

debbei
06-17-2008, 04:27 PM
OK, so does this mean that after surgery I probably won't be able to float, but I'd still be able to swim? Or maybe not even swim? SHEESH. I better really enjoy my pool this summer. It's my favorite thing about the summer.
:(

SIsForSarah
06-17-2008, 06:23 PM
Hi debbei:

I wouldn't worry about not being able to use the pool after surgery - swimming is one of the gentlest exercises on the body (the water makes it low impact) and it was actually recommended to me by my surgeon to get my lung capacity back after my surgery years ago. I think some strokes are a little harder than others depending on where you're fused, but you can always modify them. Enjoy your pool!

titaniumed
06-17-2008, 06:56 PM
Years ago I went to a naval school. Admiral Farragut Academy in Pine Beach,N.J. They made me practice survival floating by jumpimg off a ship in full dress whites, with boots on, and with a pack on my back in Barnegat Bay.
We would simulate the ship going down,which means you swim into the wind so when the oil slick catches fire you dont burn up. We would practice this on a regular basis and to be truthful I hated it! We had to tred water for long periods of time and it actually forced you to learn how to survive by survival floating. There are a bunch of diffrent methods. One method was to remove our pants, tie knots in the ankles, and flip the pants over your head to catch the air, and that worked for a short while.

I do not believe that 8 to 32 ounces of titanium or stainless would make much diffrence at all. Its all about the technique. If you inhale a full breath and hold it, you will not sink, and if you do, you will rise back to the surface in a few seconds. If you are having problems,its time for lessons.

I swam last Sunday, and had no problems and I have a full fusion.


this is why we trained so hard!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytCtUjRnsgs

debbei
06-17-2008, 08:14 PM
I'm so happy to hear that Ed!! Thanks so much. So maybe I'll have to try just a little bit harder to swim, but I'll do it!

Theresa
06-17-2008, 10:31 PM
I haven't been swimming since before my last surgery in May 2007. I had a hard time swimming free style! This last surgery was to put more curve in my back so I think I will be fine now. The way that I was i couldn't even kneel. When I did try to swim it was like a ton of bricks on my lower back. I also had problems with the breathing, I have a limited range of motion in my neck so I can't turn my head properly to get air. I will get over to the pool soon and give it another shot.