PDA

View Full Version : Interesting, readable 2003 article



Pooka1
05-29-2008, 07:27 PM
I thought so anyway. :)

http://www.oandp.org/jpo/library/2003_04S_003.asp

Rayknox
06-01-2008, 04:36 PM
This article highlights the fact that IS patients are generally very active sports wise.
This would also tie in with the fact that all the IS patients that I treat are involved in sport and have all fallen, giving the end of the spine a severe shock. Snow-boarding, skiing, trampolining, horse riding and gymnastics are common culprits.

txmarinemom
06-01-2008, 06:44 PM
This article highlights the fact that IS patients are generally very active sports wise.

This would also tie in with the fact that all the IS patients that I treat are involved in sport and have all fallen, giving the end of the spine a severe shock. Snow-boarding, skiing, trampolining, horse riding and gymnastics are common culprits.

And what kind of "treatment" do you administer?

Did I miss something you gleaned from that article? The ONLY mention of sports I found was a 20 year inconclusive study that sought a correlation between IS/neurological defects.

The study happened to include ballet students at some point during those 20 years. We have no idea how many students, or how long they, specifically, were studied.

The "Primary Message" basically debunks the factor studied, "Neurological Mechanisms". Peripheral proprioception is mentioned, and it stands to reason (just a guess here - it didn't specifically say) practiced ballerinas would have better "body awareness" than the general population - and even some other athletes.

For anyone who hasn't read the article, this section reads

NEUROLOGICAL MECHANISMS

Numerous, sophisticated neurological investigations have been conducted during the past 20 years. Although studied extensively, peripheral proprioception has not yielded consistent results. Similarly, abnormal "sway" patterns of the trunk were initially reported, but these patterns are thought to be secondary to the curve itself. Any such patterns ultimately resolve at the end of growth. Abnormalities in the cerebral cortex, cervicothoracic syrinx associated with Chiari type-I malformations, and such have been studied."

SO ... 20 years of studies, it says, have yielded inconclusive results.

The "Primary Message" essentially states (you can see it in its entirety below):

To believe neurological defects play a part in IS, you must:
assume the anecdoctal observations of IS prevalence in ballet students is also true, and ;
you must accept the validity of an impression people with IS perform above-average in sports

Again, am I missing something? Here's the "Primary Message" in its entirety:

PRIMARY MESSAGE

"Lowe summarizes these investigations nicely 2 : Any hypothesis that proposes a neurological defect must account for the impression that many patients with IS have above-average ability in sports. These observations have been largely anecdotal, but a study of girls attending ballet school showed an increased prevalence of IS as high as 20%. It's difficult, therefore, to account for a neurological defect that allows the patient to excel in activities demanding high proprioception and coordination."

You assert "This article highlights the fact that IS patients are generally very active sports wise.".

Really. Where?

And how does it support your assertion "severe shock" from falls is a contributor?

Regards,
Pam

Rayknox
06-02-2008, 05:39 AM
I did read the article. I merely picked out one aspect. Basically IS is frequently no known cause. This article does not give any further understanding even though some of the items are interesting.
If I can give you an example of why I think the way I do - an 11 year old female attended me recently. Severe pain in her back and just prescribed painkilers. She had fallen from a swing on to concrete on her bottom. On examination her spine had a visible scoliosis and lumbar kyphosis. Because it was recent it was simple to remove. She did not have time to go through a growth spurt.
I see cases like this regularly which is why I mention it.

leahdragonfly
06-02-2008, 01:53 PM
Ray,

The case you describe is hardly representative of "idiopathic scoliosis", it was obviously a post-traumatic injury as described. I would love to know what the degree of scoliosis was on x-ray of the girl you describe. And I am puzzled how you relate any of this to the article and thread that you hijacked from Sharon.

The legitimate parents and patients on this list would not be subjecting their children and/or themselves to torturous braces and terrifying surgeries if there was a simple way to "just remove" the scoliosis as you suggest. I would certainly travel anywhere with my daughter for her to receive such a treatment if it were legitimate and had scientific basis.



Gayle

Rayknox
06-02-2008, 04:27 PM
The treatment is certainly legitimate and is currently being used in hospitals in the U.S.
I apologise if I am viewed as hijacking a posting.

Pooka1
06-02-2008, 04:49 PM
What is the treatment? Can you post links to the peer-reviewed literature documenting its efficacy?

sharon

Rayknox
06-03-2008, 02:16 AM
The following is a recent university analysed study. This one is not specifically for IS but many of the patients had varying degrees of scoliosis'


The effect of TAMARS™ treatments on chronic back pain, disability and quality of life; a preliminary single group study.

Abstract

Background

Back pain is a common complaint, and is the largest single cause of workplace absence in the United Kingdom. Technology Assisted Micro-Mobilisation and Reflex Stimulation (TAMARS™) is an innovative treatment designed to gently mobilise and realign vertebrae by stimulating stretch reflexes within the paraspinal muscles. The treatment has been in use for approximately 15 years with positive anecdotal results, but a poor research evidence base. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the effect of four TAMARS™ treatment sessions on the levels of pain, disability and quality of life reported by chronic back pain sufferers.

Design

Single group pre and post intervention comparison.

Methods

Across two TAMARS™ treatment centres, 47 consecutively selected new clients (male n = 31, female n = 16, mean age 49yrs) suffering from chronic back pain (mean duration = 63 months) were assessed at baseline using three self-administered questionnaires: the Numerical Pain Scale (NPS), the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODQ), and the EQ5-D (a health related quality of life questionnaire). Each questionnaire was then repeated after 4 treatment sessions and subjects were blinded as to their initial responses.

Results

Results were analysed using a T-test for related data. Mean scores on the NPS and ODQ were found to decrease significantly (t = 9.47, p < 0.0001 and t = 5.64, p < 0.0001 respectively) while mean scores on the EQ5-D were found to increase significantly
(t = -5.66, p < 0.0001) between baseline and follow up.

Conclusions

The results of this preliminary study indicate that TAMARS™ treatments have a positive impact on the levels pain, disability and quality of life experienced by individuals suffering with chronic back pain. It is clear that further research, in the form of a randomised control trial, would be required to gain more conclusive evidence of the effects of TAMARS™ treatments.

Key words: TAMARS™, chronic back pain, spinal mobilisation, realignment, quality of life

mariaf
06-03-2008, 08:30 AM
The treatment has been in use for approximately 15 years with positive anecdotal results, but a poor research evidence base.

Rayknox,

I only see talk about "chronic back pain", NOT scoliosis. What does this have to do with scoliosis?

Chronic back pain (not caused by scoliosis) is something I know about because my husband (50) has had it for decades.

He's been to several different types of doctors in NY (from pain management to orthopedic to rehabilitation, etc.). At times, he has gotten "some" relief from PT, exercising, injections, prescription meds - but it is for the most part something he must live with.

My boss's wife had a similar problem (degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, arthritis - all common causes of chronic back pain) and went to one of the top docs in the field in NYC and was basically offered some of the same pain management techniques - but none of these doctors ever mentioned this treatment you refer to.

I remain VERY skeptical, and I think Gayle said it best when she wrote that legitimate parents and patients on this list would not be subjecting their children and/or themselves to torturous braces and terrifying surgeries if there was a simple way to "just remove" the scoliosis as you suggest.

Rayknox
06-03-2008, 09:56 AM
Mariaf,
Please remain sceptical. I would not expect otherwise until you had seen or experienced the treatment. If you would like to do so in N.Y. I can arrange it.
Then you can condemn it if you wish. The doctors cannot recommend something they do not know about so that is not unusual.
It is F.D.A approved also by the way.

mariaf
06-03-2008, 10:27 AM
Thanks for the offer, but I will decline.

I must still press you for an answer, though, as to how this can correct scoliosis?? Even if this treatment worked for chronic back pain (which I am FAR from convinced that it does), folks are here looking for answers for their own, or their childs', SCOLIOSIS.

So I must ask you - Please do not post about a treatment that's not relevant to the topic at hand - it's just a distraction and there are too many important issues that folks are trying to discuss here that DO relate to scoliosis.

Rayknox
06-03-2008, 11:55 AM
Firstly, I only posted something that I thought might be interesting. ie something that I find to be one possible cause of scoliosis.I did not start the discussion on cures.
You are obviously not interested in a different approach to scoliosis but that is your decision.
My own son had scoliosis so I do have an interest.
Now start discussing the original topic and I will watch without comment.

Pooka1
06-03-2008, 04:17 PM
(just battening down the hatches for when Pam hopefully comes along... do-da-do-da-do...)


:eek: :D

Pooka1
06-04-2008, 06:20 AM
What is TAMARS FDA-approved for EXACTLY?

Is the word "scoliosis" anywhere in the approval?

Is the claim that it can hold or improve scoliosis curves anywhere in the approval?

If not, why are you talking about FDA approval if it has been approved for non-scoliosis conditions?

s