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gerbo
12-07-2007, 06:06 AM
Anybody bored??? summaries of presentations of recent Boston conference can be found on; http://www.scoliosisjournal.com/supplements/2/S1

have fun!

jillw
12-07-2007, 08:45 AM
thanks for posting that...I have a question... There are all these interesting abstracts out there. How do we get our hands on the entire article? I haven't figured that out yet - maybe I am overlooking something? Or is it something we'd have to subscribe to? (probably very expensive) or do I physically have to try to get into a med school library? Anyone? Bueller? ( :) ) thanks

jillw
12-07-2007, 08:48 AM
OK, for example there is an article called "Reversal of curvature magnitude in response to physical methods: a 15-year followup in an adult female diagnosed with moderately severe scoliosis at age eleven years" and I clicked on something called "full text", but surely that can't be the whole article - they say they got her curve down but don't give any detail whatsoever (i.e. what were cobb angles before and after etc ) This all seems like a tease to me - I am finding that I am a detail oriented person when researching this and its driving me nuts not to be able to drill down for clues.

jillw
12-07-2007, 08:59 AM
OK, for example there is an article called "Reversal of curvature magnitude in response to physical methods: a 15-year followup in an adult female diagnosed with moderately severe scoliosis at age eleven years" and I clicked on something called "full text", but surely that can't be the whole article - they say they got her curve down but don't give any detail whatsoever (i.e. what were cobb angles before and after etc ) This all seems like a tease to me - I am finding that I am a detail oriented person when researching this and its driving me nuts not to be able to drill down for clues.

Prfbones
12-07-2007, 09:20 AM
OK, for example there is an article called "Reversal of curvature magnitude in response to physical methods: a 15-year followup in an adult female diagnosed with moderately severe scoliosis at age eleven years" and I clicked on something called "full text", but surely that can't be the whole article - they say they got her curve down but don't give any detail whatsoever (i.e. what were cobb angles before and after etc ) This all seems like a tease to me - I am finding that I am a detail oriented person when researching this and its driving me nuts not to be able to drill down for clues.

These were poster presentations given at a meeting, not published articles. For conferences, short summeries of research called 'Abstracts' are solicited by the conference prior to attendance. A committee will cull through these and select some for poster presentations or oral presentation. Often, a poster or an oral presentation will not contain enough material for a publication, and offers a good starting point for discussion. But what has been presented is all you're going to get (for now). The authors will often use an abstract presented at a conference as a sounding board to determine how viable their research is for publication. Many many many abstracts never become publications.

Actually, this site gives you a whole lot more information than most sites from a conference. It looks like they're posting most of the information from the poster which is pretty rare. Usually you get the 'big book of abstracts' or something and the attendee has to take their own notes on the rest of the poster/presentation.

gerbo
12-07-2007, 09:28 AM
as the boneperson is saying; that's all there is. Some might refer to some published articles which you could try to get via a library.

gerbo

gardenjen
12-09-2007, 05:22 PM
My understanding is that Martha Hawes pursued rx of her curves
due to increased difficulty with her breathing more than pain. I
read an associated article, Improved Chest Expansion in
Idiopathic Scoliosis after Intensive Multiple Modality Non-Surgical
Treatment in an Adult from the Chest Journal, August 2001. I saw
the poster which you refer to in Boston. I wish I had photographed
it as others did. The change was impressive: something like high 40's
reduced to twenties (interesting if it is assumed that curves are unlikely
to progress at <30 with mature Risser scores). Her treatment was
aggressive, over 15 years, maybe even risky...mainly carried out by
a DO named William Brooks. I suspect that few people have had that
kind of care. It's expensive, requires absolute commitment, and is very
slow in its effect, if it works. Here in the US we like things 'fixed' ASAP
with guarantees, and expect our insurance to pay. I loved listening to
the European contingency in Boston. So sensible...

jillw
12-11-2007, 09:03 AM
Prfbones, thank you for explaining!

Writer
12-14-2007, 11:44 PM
Watch the SOSORT website's journal pages for more information about the conference. See www.scoliosisjournal.org. It appears that most or all of the longer presentations (as opposed to poster presentations) are already published there, though a few in "provisional PDF" form, that is, what you see is complete but may be an early version.

Regarding Martha Hawes' poster, she has previously published longer reports about her case. Go to PubMed -- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez -- and search on "Hawes M scoliosis". A couple of her publications are listed in full text links for free.

You can always try contacting the author(s) of an article if you're interested in more details and can only see an abstract. Email contacts for authors, or at least a corresponding author, are given in icons under the article or poster title.