PDA

View Full Version : Direction of curves



rtremb
10-02-2007, 12:45 AM
Today we received my son Christopher's hospital radiology report from his June 7th, 2007 x-rays. He is 17 years old - we still don't know his Risser #. The report uses new detail we haven't had previously as follows:
"Thoracic level, levoscoliosis measured at 38 degrees T8-T12
Lumbar level, dextroscoliosis measured at 27 degrees T12 and L4."

I believe this means his curves are the opposite of his sister Esme's.

I remember vaguely reading on this forum that thoracic curves to the left and lumber to the right are rare. Am I right in thinking this?

gerbo
10-02-2007, 12:47 PM
I think we need to know if this diagnosis of "idiopathic curves" is right because NF curves keep moving for life

there is just no way of knowing either way, as there is no diagnostic test telling you what is causing his scoliosis. I suppose, even if it is idiopatic, there is no garantee it won't progress, so you need to watch it anyway.

What you do in the mean time is open for discussion. There has been the suggestion that the spinecor can prevent progression in mature scoliosis. Schroth might help, but requires lot of commitment and no garantee of succes. I would be tempted to try the torsorotation exercises. If it helps in younger children, why should it not work in more mature people?? Whatever you try, it remains trial and error though.

rtremb
10-02-2007, 12:58 PM
Chris was horrified when we suggested he might need to wear the Spinecor in case he has another growth spurt. I think knowing his Risser score would be useful information and we will make sure at his next appointment on November 2nd we get this.
The torso rotation is only available in and around Toronto so regular treatment isn't an option for our two children unless we buy the equipment ourselves - is there an inexpensive home version?

gerbo
10-02-2007, 01:23 PM
the actual medx machine is a bit hard to find, but you can gather from the article that fairly "standard" torso twist- machines, could be used and are not unusual equipment in "ordinary" gyms. At least, that is where we found one

gerbo

rtremb
10-02-2007, 02:28 PM
Thanks Gerbo. I will call some local gyms - there are some big ones here in the City so maybe they will have the right equipment.

Allegra
10-11-2007, 12:12 AM
I'm pretty sure I have a left thoracic, right lumbar set of curves.
Is that unusual?
I'm left handed, too. ahahaha :)

BETall
10-11-2007, 12:57 AM
Chris was horrified when we suggested he might need to wear the Spinecor in case he has another growth spurt. I think knowing his Risser score would be useful information and we will make sure at his next appointment on November 2nd we get this.
The torso rotation is only available in and around Toronto so regular treatment isn't an option for our two children unless we buy the equipment ourselves - is there an inexpensive home version?
Why to cause more torsions to the spine with these machines at the Gyms ? An inexpensive tool to help elongate the spine asymetrically and the oppossite of what the curves are going is a bar across a door firmily secure. Another inexpensive aid you can take a look is at : www.Altusdoor gym and can be order at Amazones.com. With the Schroth method you learn for life any time, anywhere to correct as permissible, the unexpected deformities . The earlier the scoliosis is treated the better outcome. Nobody guarantees you any thing , although we need to keep working at it .

CurvySAT05
10-11-2007, 01:31 AM
Left thoracic curves while rare, are more commonly seen in males than females for some reason. He still could have an "idiopathic" curve, or it could be caused by the NF. Only an orthopedic surgeon can make that diagnosis, and there is no test to tell for sure to detect it. They will have to go on history, physical exam and x-rays/radiological exams.

rtremb
10-11-2007, 02:44 AM
Betall:

This is the link to an article about the core torso-rotation:

http://www.spineuniverse.com/displayarticle.php/article238.html

There are links at the bottom of the article with more information.

I can't get the link for altusdoor to work - do you have another url I could try.

Thanks. Ruth

rtremb
10-11-2007, 02:49 AM
Curvy:
Thanks for your post. Chris has been seeing an orthopaedic doctor for several years now. We have requested a different doctor and will be seeing him in early November
Ruth

BETall
10-15-2007, 02:54 AM
Betall:

This is the link to an article about the core torso-rotation:

http://www.spineuniverse.com/displayarticle.php/article238.html

There are links at the bottom of the article with more information.

I can't get the link for altusdoor to work - do you have another url I could try.

Thanks. Ruth
Hi Ruth :
Thank you for the link on the core torso-rotation . Yes, I have visit this office and experience this machine although when the person with scoliosis gets older they can't buy these machines in contrary with the Schroth Three Dimensional method where you can exercise any time , any where and there is plenty of research being done . Please go to Sosort.org and check it out . For altus door gym , please go to : www.sports unlimited.com click=fitness equipment ( $36,99 ) Phone : 1(800) 693-6368

rtremb
10-16-2007, 08:13 PM
Betall:
I went to the Altus Door Gym site - which piece of fitness equipment are you referring to in your post?
Is there an exercise, or a piece of equpiment to exercise with, which is as effective torso rotation for scoliosis?
Ruth

rtremb
11-23-2007, 01:47 AM
Forgot to post about this - my son saw the new orthopaedic doctor in early November and had new x-rays. His curves are the same as they have been for about a year now (just less than 40) so we are really pleased because the doctors think he won't need surgery. We know the curves could move when he is an adult but for now anyway surgery isn't being recommended. The doctor said he is a Risser 4 or 5.


My son never has any pain with his scoliosis unlike my daughter and I.

Ruth

green m&m
12-03-2007, 02:25 AM
Hi Ruth,

I have NF and left thoracic scoliosis. Mine was due to NF and have a tumor that spans from T9 to T12/L1, which is exactly the levels my major curve is involved in.

Luckely my curve seems to be stable at the moment, my current degree is the same as last year's.

There are certain characteristics with NF related scoliosis. The curves tend to involve only a few vertebra, and enlarged neural formaina, vetebral body scalloping, dural ectasia and tumors are frequently involved. Without the previous symptoms, it's hard to tell wether or not his curve is NF related or not.

rtremb
12-03-2007, 08:00 PM
Green m&m:

Thanks for your post. Sorry to hear about your scoliosis curves - do they cause you any pain? What do the doctor's say your curve measurements are?

Ruth

proudmom2_2
12-04-2007, 01:50 PM
I'm new here...my daughter, Lindsay (13yo), has a 42 T/28 L curve. She is currently going throught the Clear Institute program in Oklahoma. I've been lurking on here for awhile now and was wondering how you know if your child has NF?

Tina

rtremb
12-04-2007, 02:40 PM
Our child was diagnosed by his paediatrician when he was about 3.

In diagnosing NF1, a physician looks for two or more of the following:

five or more light brown skin spots (cafe-au-lait macules) measuring more than 5 millimeters in diameter in patients under the age of puberty or more than 15 millimeters across in adults and children over the age of puberty;

two or more neurofibromas (tumors that grow on a nerve or nerve tissue, under the skin) or one plexiform neurofibroma (involving many nerves);

freckling in the armpit or groin areas;

benign growths on the iris of the eye (known as Lisch nodules or iris hamartomas);

a tumor on the optic nerve (optic glioma);

severe scoliosis (curvature of the spine);

enlargement or deformation of certain bones other than the spine;

and a parent, sibling, or child with NF1

To determine if an individual has NF2, a physician looks for the following:

1. bilateral eighth nerve tumors,

2. a parent, sibling, or child with NF2 and a unilateral eighth nerve tumor, or

3. a parent, sibling, or child with NF2 and any two of the following:

glioma,
meningioma,
neurofibroma,
schwannoma,
or cataract at an early age.

Ruth

proudmom2_2
12-04-2007, 03:37 PM
Ruth, thanks for clarifying that for me. Much appreciated!

Tina

green m&m
12-06-2007, 05:04 PM
Green m&m:

Thanks for your post. Sorry to hear about your scoliosis curves - do they cause you any pain? What do the doctor's say your curve measurements are?

Ruth

Sometimes I do get pain, but nothing that bad really... I'm a little used to it now I guess.

My measurements are in my signature, but the T curve is only from T9 to T12...can't remember the span of my L curve but that one is only compensatory so it's not really 'important'...

green m&m
12-06-2007, 05:12 PM
Our child was diagnosed by his paediatrician when he was about 3.

In diagnosing NF1, a physician looks for two or more of the following:

five or more light brown skin spots (cafe-au-lait macules) measuring more than 5 millimeters in diameter in patients under the age of puberty or more than 15 millimeters across in adults and children over the age of puberty;

two or more neurofibromas (tumors that grow on a nerve or nerve tissue, under the skin) or one plexiform neurofibroma (involving many nerves);

freckling in the armpit or groin areas;

benign growths on the iris of the eye (known as Lisch nodules or iris hamartomas);

a tumor on the optic nerve (optic glioma);
severe scoliosis (curvature of the spine);
enlargement or deformation of certain bones other than the spine;
and a parent, sibling, or child with NF1

Ruth

Actually scoliosis is not an official diagnostic criteria for NF1, it's common, but won't count if/when looking to dx.

rtremb
12-06-2007, 08:45 PM
Greeen M&M:

I pulled that NF information from the Ontario Scoliosis website!! Guess they don't know their stuff too well because I would agree with you.

Ruth