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lindabar
04-19-2004, 06:37 PM
I have a double curve, the thoracic is 64 degress. I am 48. I am considering surgery. I am not in real pain, but my muscles get fatigued from prolonged standing, walking and even sitting. I would like to do work that requires prolonged standing and I would like to run again, something I had to give up 10 years ago because of hip pain. Am I being unrealistic? I am seeing a surgeon in a couple of days.

LindaRacine
04-19-2004, 07:38 PM
Hi Lindabar...

Do you know if your curves have progressed in the last 10-20 years? The reason I ask is that (when asked) I usually tell adults who don't have pain or progression, to try to hold out for no surgery. The adults I know who are the least happy with the results of scoliosis surgery are those who had no pain before having their surgery.

With that said, if your curves are progressing, it seems possible that your fatigue will increase along with your curves. (Studies show that curves > 50 degrees increase an average of about 1-2 degrees a year.)

So, if you think you'll eventually decide on having surgery, I would urge you to do it sooner rather than later. Complications increase exponentially with age, so the sooner the better if you will eventually have to have the surgery anyway.

Regards,
Linda

lindabar
04-20-2004, 08:41 PM
Hi Linda,
Thanks for your reply. My curve has been progressing about .5 degrees a year. Surgeons I have seen in the past have told me that surgery is optional, that is why I never had it. At the current rate of progression I would have a 80 degree curve at age 75. That is one of the reasons I am thinking about having it done now.

LindaRacine
04-20-2004, 09:07 PM
Hi Lindabar...

It will probably be a difficult decision for you. There are people with untreated curves >80 degrees who lead fairly normal lives. I know people with untreated large curves who have to lead very sedentary lives. I don't think there's any way of know into which group you'll fall.

Good luck with your decision.

Regards,
Linda

MaryK
04-21-2004, 05:57 PM
My dad had surgery when he was in his forties also. His decison to go ahead with the surgery was the effect the curvature was having on his daily life and health. He had both scoliosis and Kyphosis. The kyphosis was impairing his heart and lungs ability to work correctly. His ability to work was also being affected. Having the surgery took the pressure off of his organs and allowed him several more years of work.

Ask your doctor specific questions. Find out the likelyhood of your daily activities further impaired. Also find out what the doctor considers as conditions for surgery. The more specific questions you have answered the better you will be able to decide if you want surgery or not!

Good luck!