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dsal
04-19-2004, 02:26 PM
For years before I was ever diagnosed with Scoliosis (which I think is considered minor at 19 degrees), I always noticed that one leg and one arm were "shorter," and now I realize it is probably due to the curve in my back. Lately, though, I've noticed that the knee on the "short" leg has been achy, and I'm thinking that since both feet do need to hit the ground to walk, that extra stretching or something is going on in those muscles for my foot to reach the ground. How do you compensate for this? Do you wear some elevating shoe-orthotics to even things out?

Thanks,
dsal

dsal
04-20-2004, 11:48 AM
Wow, I see 12 views, yet no replies. Please, someone, share your experience and suggestions regarding my posts! I'm sure a wealth of information is lurking on this board, just waiting to come out and help others such as myself!

Thanks,
dsal

MaryK
04-21-2004, 05:05 PM
I am 29 and have arthritis pain in one knee. I have heard that scoliosis curve can cause limbs to be shortened. I have a question though, do you limp alot? Also, Have you ever injured that knee? An injury can be the cause of arthritis, though I'm not sure of the scientific proof. I've turned towards holisitic methods to help my own pain. You can find books at the library about holistic healing (herds and such). To give you an idea of how that approach helps, since I've started holistic methods I've dropped both of my arthritis meds and my steroid inhailor. It would be worth seeking out a professional!

If you do consider an elevated shoe talk to your doctor 1st. The shorter leg may not be the entire cause.

GeorgeDittmar
04-21-2004, 06:30 PM
i also have a bad knee but my chiropractor actually showed me some stuff to help that

dsal
04-21-2004, 06:30 PM
Mary K,

Thanks for your insight. I'm really guessing that due to scoliosis, it appears that one leg is shorter than the other. My guess is that in actuality, both legs are about the same length, but due to the curve/rotation, one hip is higher than the other, therefore one leg seems longer than the other.

I've been wondering, though, if maybe extra stretches would help with this. So, I tried some yoga stretches yesterday and plan to continue to see if this will help.

I'll keep your arthritis suggestion in mind, however, because I do have some arthritis, and I imagine it will progress down the road.

Oh, to answer your question, no, I do not limp at all. I just walk regular, whether or not I am bothered by knee pain. And the knee pain only happens on occasion; it is not a constant occurance. But when it does act up, it is quite uncomfortable!

Thanks again for your thoughtful response!

dsal

MaryK
04-21-2004, 07:10 PM
Stretches will not only help the scoliosis pain but the occational arthritis pain too. It's important to keep in shape. I didn't and now I get to try and reverse that. Of course a hormone imbalance doesn't help much either! Walking, just a regular stroll through the neighborhood, will also help alot. That's what I do for low back pain and it helps my knee too.

dsal
04-21-2004, 08:17 PM
Thanks. Have you heard any comments on the new Yoga for Scoliosis video that is available on this site? It sounds interesting.

dsal

MaryK
04-22-2004, 05:03 PM
I hadn't heard of it! I have heard that yoga can help scoliosis, or at least the pain from it. I read that the type of yoga is important. The yoga that helps is the one that centers on posture and gentle stretches. With the instruction of a yoga teacher people with scoliosis can help their curvatures and ease their pain. It also helps the strengthen the back muscles.

Barbs
07-11-2005, 08:15 AM
I am actually very confused on this one. Some 'experts' seem to think that leg length discrepancy is caused by the scoliosis and other ones that the leg length discrepancy causes the scoliosis.

Whatever the cause/effect jobby is, I have actually found quite a few of my unexplained symptoms are to be found under things on the internet which are just about leg length discrepancy.

If you check out with a specialist that a shoe thingy might help and wont harm id give it a go.

Good luck Barbs

juliebelle
07-11-2005, 07:28 PM
I have had a very similar experience - I'm 23, and was only recently diagnosed with scoliosis. I've had hip, knee, shoulder and lower back problems for years, some attributable to injury and some with no apparent cause. My scoliosis is relatively minor, but even minor spinal curvature can cause problems, especially if, like me, you run a lot. I used to run 40 miles a week, but my hip and knee pain became so extreme that I had to cut back to 15 miles a week, and even that is sometimes too much. For me, the cause is that the curve in my spine pulls my right hip up - my legs are the same length, but my left leg takes much more force when I run or stand for a long time because my hip is lower on that side. I also find that I get sharp pain behind my left shoulder blade when I run or walk long distances. No one could give me a good explanation for why I had so much pain without any injuries, until I finally was diagnosed with scoliosis. Having a curve in your spine means that your weight is unevenly distributed between your legs and can also mean that your hips and knees are bearing weight at an angle that isn't ideal. I've found that the best way for me to manage pain and stiffness is to combine different kinds of exercise. I run a couple of days a week, and try to mix it up with swimming, using an elliptical trainer and hiking. Stretching is important, but it only will get you so far - it helps relieve or prevent some pain for me, but if I keep doing the same thing, stretching won't help me much. I don't know about wearing a lift - I wear orthotics for running, but haven't considered a lift.

juliebelle
07-11-2005, 07:41 PM
I've done a fair amount of yoga and pilates, and I have had VERY different experiences depending on the kind of yoga, the instructor and the intensity. Pilates has actually worked well for me, because it doesn't generally involve a lot of twisting or arching of your back, but has some good stretching and strengthening components - it can be a little tough on your lower back, though, so watch out! As far as yoga goes, I have found both Iyenger and Vinyasa yoga to be really helpful - both of these practices focus on posture and gentle stretching, and are good for people at all levels of fitness. Iyenger is great for developing strength, too, because it focuses on holding positions for a longer time, but still maintaining a good comfort level and emphasizing posture.

However, anyone with scoliosis or any other back problems should be VERY wary of Power yoga or Astanga yoga. These practices emphasize speed, repetition, and strength, and pay very little attention to posture or stretching. I am in good shape and experienced with yoga, and after an intermediate level Astanga yoga class, I could barely get up off the floor. I missed work the next day with back spasms and had serious low back pain and instability for two weeks afterwards. You may be able to build up to these kinds of yoga practice, but it will probably take a long time, and is DEFINITELY not the place to start.

shelley
07-14-2005, 09:41 PM
You might want to consider getting your knee xrayed or having an MRI to determine whether there has been some injury to your knee. If there isn't any damage, then a general exercise program might help to strengthen your knee and relieve the stiffness. I agree with Juliebelle that a combination of different kinds of exercises, with stretching at various intervals during your workout, is most effective. Working with a trainer at you local gym might help you to develop a suitable exercise program. I am not an advocate of yoga, since I have found many of the positions to be unattainable with Harrington rods.