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dsal
04-19-2004, 02:22 PM
Has anyone ordered and tried the "Yoga for Scoliosis" DVD that is available on this site? If so, has it helped? And, is it advantageous or redundant to purchase the manual and the DVD?

Thanks,
dsal

Erica M
05-01-2004, 05:47 PM
I have purchased the tape and used it several times. I really like it a lot, and have found Elise's instruction very clear and easy to follow. All of her students in the tape have different types of scoliosis, and Elise explains how to perform each exercise according to what types of cuves you have in your spine. I would recommend it.

Earth
05-31-2004, 12:02 PM
Greetings everyone,

I'm a newbie here...

I like yoga.

I don't have scoliosis.

I have a friend that does.

I'd like to introduce yoga to my friend.

Can someone please tell me how yoga is helping?

I really appreciate any further information on yoga and scoliosis.

Thanks, :)

LindaRacine
05-31-2004, 12:58 PM
Earth...

This website might be of help:

http://www.ebmyoga.com

Regards,
Linda

dsal
05-31-2004, 02:06 PM
Oh, thank you for that link!!

dsal

phaden
05-31-2004, 03:41 PM
We have purchased the tape, and I think it's very good, from both a Yoga perspective, and a scoli treatment perspective. The teacher gives modifcations for each posture depending on the type of curve you have, and it's all done with a sensible yoga attitude of "don't push, listen to your body". Doing the practice eases my duaghter's muscle tension and stiffness from the brace, and of course, keeps her muscles strong.

The only downside we have is that my daughter is put off a little by the constant references to scoliosis, which she sometimes just gets tired of thinking about. Then she prefers to do a "regular" yoga practice, which her physiotherapist has said is also fine for her.

Patricia

Earth
06-03-2004, 08:02 AM
Thank you for the link.

I showed it to my friend and she is interested.


For those of you practice yoga, can i ask which posture(s) you like the most?

Which postures do you recommend?

Which postures do you not recommend?

(Example: sun salutations, cat stretch, superman, shoulder stand, plough...)

Thanks :)

phaden
06-03-2004, 04:16 PM
Cat Stretch - general spine flexibility

All twists - decompressing against the spinal rotation

Side bends - same

My daughter has a double major curve, so does twists and side bends on both sides in balance. The Yoga for Scoliosis DVD adjusts the postures slightly for single curves, but our physio has stressed the importance of not trying to "correct" the scoliosis by overworking one side or direction, which can just lead to muscular imbalance, without actually modifying the skeletal problems.

Patricia

Earth
06-04-2004, 08:06 AM
Cat Stretch - general spine flexibility

All twists - decompressing against the spinal rotation

Side bends - same

^^
These are really good.


Forward/Backward bends (standing/sitting position) = good?

Is shoulder stand / plough recommended ?
(for the experienced practitioners)




our physio has stressed the importance of not trying to "correct" the scoliosis by overworking one side or direction, which can just lead to muscular imbalance, without actually modifying the skeletal problems.


This makes a lot of sense. What ever is done to one side, should be done to the other side.

Thanks for the advice Pat. :)

Maria Crouch
06-13-2004, 07:13 AM
I am 44 years old. I was diagnosed with scoliosis when I was about 13 years old. For several years I wore a brace. Seems to have stopped progress of the curvature (27 degrees). A few years ago I was told I had slightly herniated disks at the two spots where my scoliosis curves are, but I should continue to exercise as pain allowed. I continued to run, do martial arts and do yoga. About six months ago, at the end of a Bikram yoga session I felt something pull in my lower back. Eventually the pain in the back went away, but I have had symptoms that seem like sciatica ever since. The doctors that I have seen tell me that MRI doesn't seem to show that the disks are any more herniated than they were a few years ago. I have curtailed most of my activities. I don't run, but I walk. I am still doing martial arts, but with trepidation, and there are many things that I don't do because I feel the sciatica act up right away.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Earth
06-15-2004, 07:50 AM
Originally posted by Maria Crouch
I am 44 years old. I was diagnosed with scoliosis when I was about 13 years old. For several years I wore a brace. Seems to have stopped progress of the curvature (27 degrees). A few years ago I was told I had slightly herniated disks at the two spots where my scoliosis curves are, but I should continue to exercise as pain allowed. I continued to run, do martial arts and do yoga. About six months ago, at the end of a Bikram yoga session I felt something pull in my lower back. Eventually the pain in the back went away, but I have had symptoms that seem like sciatica ever since. The doctors that I have seen tell me that MRI doesn't seem to show that the disks are any more herniated than they were a few years ago. I have curtailed most of my activities. I don't run, but I walk. I am still doing martial arts, but with trepidation, and there are many things that I don't do because I feel the sciatica act up right away.

Does anyone have any suggestions?


Isn't running, Martial Arts & Bikram-type yoga quite intense?

Maria Crouch
06-15-2004, 12:17 PM
Yes, they are quite intense. I would really like to believe that there is a way that an otherwise healthy 44 year old can continue to exercise vigorously, in spite of scoliosis. But the sciatica, apparently caused by the herniated disk, is a real impediment.

Has anyone with herniated disk caused by the pressure of the scoliosis curve found anything that helps (other than pain meds) with the discomfort/pain?

LindaRacine
06-15-2004, 12:23 PM
Maria...

I've been able to control much of the pain from the one bad disc below my fusion by doing daily abdominal strengthening exercise. I would STRONGLY recommend that you find a physical therapist who can design an appropriate exercise or two, and ensure that you're doing them correctly.

--Linda