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worrier
10-03-2005, 11:43 PM
My 14 year old daughter was just diagnosed with double scoliosis. The doctor said the upper curvature "was about 19 and the lower was about 17" Then he went on to say there could be a 4 degree variance....he told us to come back for x-rays in 4 months. She has been checked at school for the past 3 years with no concerns. Now, I just noticed the hump on her shoulder. I am afraid to wait. Why should we wait for it to get worse? What is the least curvature someone had, when they got their brace? :confused:

LindaRacine
10-04-2005, 01:07 AM
Hi Worrier...

Depending on whether your daughter is skeletally mature or not, she may have only a very small chance that her curves will progress. Putting a kid in a scoliosis brace is a pretty big deal, and most teens don't tolerate it very well. So, putting a kid in an expensive brace, when there's a good probability that she won't need it, is overkill. Did the doctor tell you what your daughter's Risser grade is? Has she started her periods? If so, how long ago?

Here's a research paper on the probability of progression:

http://www.vh.org/pediatric/provider/orthopaedics/AIS/06Probabilities.html

Regards,
Linda

worrier
10-04-2005, 09:15 AM
Hi Linda,

Thanks for your reply. No, her doctor did not tell us her Risser grade. She started her periods about 7 months ago and is just now starting to develop. I am just worried because I see a hump now and one hip is slightly higher. I just don't want it to become really obvious. I read on one site that bracing should be considered if the curvature is 20 to 30 degrees. So, if he thinks there could be a 4 degree variance that could put both curves above 20. Of course, it also could be lower. I really don't want her in a brace because it would devastate her, however progressive physical changes would also devastate her. I am just thinking if we put a brace on now or in the near future, maybe she wouldn't have to wear it very long. From what I read the brace won't fix the curvature, it just stops the progression. So, why should we wait for the deformity to worsen and then put a brace on? It will stop the progression but leave her with the deformity.

Thanks,
worrier :confused:

LindaRacine
10-04-2005, 12:19 PM
Hi Worrier...

If your daughter started her period 7 months ago, she's almost certainly at the end of her skeletal growth, which means that she's probably a Risser 4 or 5. With small curves and a high Risser score, she has very little probability that her curves will ever increase. Once a child is skeletally mature, a brace would be of no benefit.

Regards,
Linda

marmyte
10-04-2005, 01:36 PM
bracing's an issue that depends on where in the world you are. i live in the uk and here i would say that most doctors would get your daughter cast and wearing a brace as though they are surgeons they believe that if surgery can be avoided, it should. although like linda said if your daughter's curves are currently under 20 degrees and she is almost skeletally mature, progression is possibly unlikely, but i think most doctors here wouldn't take that chance. if you're very concerned i would say seek a second opinion and get her curves measured by someone else. my surgeon told me that every doctor in the world could measure a patient's xrays and come up with different answers, but if your second opinion found a significant difference there could be cause for concern. it's hard to give advice like this though as i don't know the ins and outs of your situation.

as you can see in my signature, i was diagnosed at 14 and my curves were more than double your daughter's. braces aren't just used to prevent progression - if the spine is flexible enough (before skeletal maturity is reached) and the patient is dedicated to brace-wear, then correction can be achieved (though 100% correction is unlikely, it can be corrected by maybe 50%)...so what i'm saying is, at the same age, i and other people were a lot worse, so perhaps your doctor is right and there isn't cause for concern.

my main piece of advice would be seek a second opinion if you are worried :)

Celia
10-04-2005, 02:02 PM
Worrier,

I think your concern is a valid one ! It's easy to talk about statistics and probabilities and look at the overall picture, but the most important person in all of this is your daughter - do you really want to be playing russian roulete with your daughter's health ? It's quite possible that a few years from now you'll be kicking yourself for not taking action. True, nowadays you can't expect braces to 'correct' a curve and if it happens, that's a major bonus and it's usually on average about 5 degrees. If your daughter's curve progresses, don't expect sympathy from the doctors because they stand to profit financially from performing the surgery - I know this sounds harsh, but it's true :( If your daughter has a hump, there is probably rotation and this is not good. Do all that you can to help your daughter and be thankful she is almost finished growing. She has the rest of her life ahead of her and you don't want her living with a painful deformity.

Oh, to answer your question, I've seen children with curves of 15 degrees treated with the SpineCor brace.



Celia

Jacque's Mom
10-04-2005, 02:57 PM
Worrier,

My daughter was diagnosed at age 11, her curve then was low 20's. She was checked every four to six months and her curve went up and down every visit. She got her period at ten years old, which is a big plus. She was never braced, although at one point her curve was borderline. Just recently went for her final check up (almost 19 yrs. old) and her curve is under 20 degrees. She never suffered from any pain. I on the other hand suffered from pain as a very young girl until I had the surgery at 28. I would wait at least for the first four months for a re-check and see how her curve is. Good luck, LYNN

LindaRacine
10-04-2005, 04:01 PM
Hi...

While I agree that when it's you or your child, statistics mean nothing, I believe we still owe it to our fellow citizens to be socially responsible in utilizing healthcare. The same argument could be made for surgery. Most kids with small curves never need surgery, but some do. Does that mean we should have all kids with curves of 20 degrees or more go through surgery? Of course not.

This child has no history of progression yet and is probably skeletally mature or close to it. If we were to brace everyone in that category, it would cost all of us a considerable amount. We all have the responsibility to keep healthcare and healthcare insurance affordable so that as many people as possible have access to it. If we brace every kid with a 20 degree curve, then there are going to be a whole lot of kids with much larger curves who probably won't have access to bracing or surgery.

Now, if everyone who wants to put their kids in a brace before it's deemed medically necessary wants to pay for the brace out of their own pocket, I have no argument other than that you're probably making the kid go through some real emotional turmoil for no reason.

Regards,
Linda

Celia
10-04-2005, 04:31 PM
Linda,

Worrier's daughter has a rib hump ! I doubt whether the calculation given by her ortho is even accurate, he even qualified the calculation by saying it could be off by 4 degrees or so. I don't want to sound like an alarmist, but I've come across far too many "just wait and watch" scenerios where the curve progresses within a matter of months to surgery level. I've also read of many cases where orthos only begin to brace when the curve is already at 45 degrees !!!! Now tell me this downright unfair ! How do those kids even have a chance in hell of stopping the curve from progressing ?! I've also come across individual cases (titanium rib) where surgery costs for ONE child approximates a million dollars !!! These are children with idiopathic scoliosis who were told to watch and wait ! Is society better off ? Is health care better off ? I doubt it.

LindaRacine
10-04-2005, 05:06 PM
Celia...

When a skeletally immature child has a good chance of curve progression to the surgical stage, bracing is a very good option. That's not the case we're talking about here. In your scenario, you'd put every kid with at least a 20 degree curve in a brace, regardless of Risser and regardless of lack of documented progression. Where should we draw the line? Anyone with a 19 degree curve doesn't get a brace? The medical community has studied this subject and has recommended that a child like Worrieds should not be braced. If, at the 3-4 month checkup, significant progression is seen, then bracing may be appropriate. By the way, even if the kid is put in a brace today, there's no guarantee that it will stop progression. I will always believe that putting a child in a scoliosis brace before it's medically warranted is cruel to the child and detrimental to society.

--Linda

P.S. There is always about a +/- 5 degree margin of error in measuring curves. As Worried pointed out, it could be -5 degrees, in which case, there's about zero chance that the curves will ever increase.

Celia
10-04-2005, 05:24 PM
Celia...

In your scenario, you'd put every kid with at least a 20 degree curve in a brace, regardless of Risser and regardless of lack of documented progression. Where should we draw the line? Anyone with a 19 degree curve doesn't get a brace?


Nope, documented progression, level of rotation, RVAD - YES brace. I don't think waiting for a curve to progress to 30 or 45 degrees and then bracing is very effective. Worrier's daughter obviously has rotation and uneven hips - a sure sign for progression. I think quality of life for ALL is very important, especially the quality of life of an individual whose scoliosis is left untreated and allowed to progress in a relentless fashion. How many braces can we buy with one million dollars ? ;)

marmyte
10-04-2005, 05:26 PM
why on earth should money come into the wellbeing of and future of your child's health?

LindaRacine
10-04-2005, 06:01 PM
Marmyte...

In my opinion, if the excessive healthcare of some causes millions of others to have no access to healthcare, then the greater good should be considered.

--Linda

LindaRacine
10-04-2005, 06:08 PM
Celia...

I've never personally seen a kid with at least a 20 degree curve who doesn't have rotation.

--Linda

Celia
10-04-2005, 06:12 PM
Linda,

I'm sure Worrier really appreciates all the time we're spending on her case :D What was I going to say ?..... Oh yes, spinal surgery costs/revision surgery will surely bankrupt the system.

LindaRacine
10-04-2005, 06:39 PM
Celia...

I totally agree that kids who have a significant chance of having surgery should be braced if caught in time. A 14 year old girl with curves < 25 degrees, who has had her period for 7 months, and for whom progression has not been documented, is VERY unlikely to ever need surgery. I am NOT against bracing. I wish my curves had been caught in time so I could have possibly avoided surgery.

I'm hopeful that someone with the appropriate statistics will see this thread and post about the actual cost to society for bracing kids who have little or no chance of ever needing surgery.

--Linda

Celia
10-04-2005, 07:01 PM
Linda,

I think worrier should get a second opinion as to whether the cobb angle calculations are correct, I doubt they are. I hate to quote this but here it is: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. :)

worrier
10-04-2005, 10:37 PM
I'm sorry, I didn't mean to set people off! :eek: She is due to go back to the doc in 4 months for more xrays. My husband wants to get a 2nd opinion in about 2 months. So, I guess I will just have to wait and see. I'll keep you posted. One last question...to those of you that are waiting....do you look at your child's back in between visits to note any changes? If so, how often? I am trying to downplay this with my kid.

Thanks, this is a great forum. :confused:

worrier
10-04-2005, 10:40 PM
Whoops.... Meant to put a :) about this being a good forum

marmyte
10-05-2005, 03:52 AM
Marmyte...

In my opinion, if the excessive healthcare of some causes millions of others to have no access to healthcare, then the greater good should be considered.

--Linda
bracing is by no means "excessive", like celia has already said, it has prevented many surgeries and if used correctly it will prevent many more. no it doesn't always work, but if you have a CHANCE of avoiding the emotional and physical trauma for the patient, then it's worth trying

Celia
10-05-2005, 09:13 AM
Worrier,

Nobody is angry, sometimes we enjoy having heated discussions :D I came across another thread yesterday, in the "new posts" section and I can't remember the exact details but again the surgeon is recommending waiting until the curve progresses to 50 degrees before bracing. :eek: I understand that bracing can be a traumatic event for a teenager, but major invasive spinal surgery with is WAY more traumatic for the child. Consider the life long pain and complications from surgery that the poor child will have to live with - let's face it spinal surgery is no where near perfect AND it's VERY VERY expensive ( $200,000 ?). There is definitely something sinister and wrong with the current system. Becky (Marmyte) has recently undergone spinal fusion, and she's here to tell you that if you can prevent it - GO FOR IT !!!!!!

marmyte
10-05-2005, 09:27 AM
$200,000 are you serious?!?! wow my surgery was a lot less than that. i said in another thread recently that if you figure it out and think about it - how much time in relative terms will your child spend in a brace? a few years, which have the potential to prevent major surgery. i can't understand why doctors wait until a curve is at 50* before bracing :confused:

Celia
10-05-2005, 11:03 AM
Becky,

These surgeries are incredibly expensive, I've heard of some surgeries costing $250,000. If you consider the Titanium rib many of these young children will require surgeries throughout their growing years and I can't even imagine the total cost at the end of it all - somewhere in the millions for each child! I don't like to talk dollars and cents when the life of a child is in question, but if you look at this from another angle something has to be done to prevent the necessity for subjecting these poor children to endless surgeries. Many of these children are in constant pain, and it breaks my heart :(

cloggerx3
10-11-2005, 08:44 PM
I'm worrier's daughter

I'm glad yall care about me :)

scoligirl2025
10-21-2005, 07:03 AM
do yall mind if a teen butts in here?

about surgery~ i'm not really sure how much it costs, but i think it's $100,000-$150,000. and i know kids who've had surgery, and they are absolutely pain free now.

worrier~ i have a situation very similair to your daughter's. (sorry this might take a while) i am 13 (14 in 3 months) and was diagnosed in june with two 20* curves. i was told to wait for 4 months, so i went back at the end of september. my thoracic (top) curve stayed the same at 20* but because i only grew in one leg, the lumbar (bottom) curve went up to 25*. my dr. said that since the only reason i got worse was cuz i'm growing weird, he couldn't justify bracing me. i am currently wearing a shoelift and praying it works. if i get any worse, i will be braced. i have had my period for like 7 months, and am a risser 2. (i think i heard that that means i have the skeletal maturity of a 10-year old child)
my dr. said that 20* is closer to normal than it is abnormal, and i really don't think bracing is required at 19* and 17*. that is totally unnecessary! just take it day by day.

cloggerx3 (worrier's daughter)~ you might wanna join www.spinekids.com too! it's a great forum for scoli kids, and you get sooooo much support!

Attie
10-21-2005, 08:38 AM
Dear Worrier, I understand your worries! My daughter (now 14) was diagnosed at 11 with a double curve of 17 degrees which stayed put for a year and then jumped to 24 at which time she started wearing a TLSO brace. She's had her brace (on her 3rd one) since Aug. 2003. Just last Jan (2005) she began her period. We are still looking at about another year and a half before she's done with it all, we hope.

Before you worry too much right now I think you need some additional information. Ask your doctor where she is on the Risser scale...very important to know! The fact that she's 14 and just got her period several months ago only means that she can still grow for up to 2 years after she started her cycle. (This is what I have been told by her orthopedist as well as my gyn.) My daughter's doctor has watched her growth plate in her hip...when that is closed (she'll be at a Risser 5 then) and her height remains stable then she'll be done growing. It's so hard to predict how long that will take, though. I recently learned that the 6 months prior to the beginning of menstruation and the 6 months following that can be times of significant growth spurts.

In my daughter's case, her curves had responded well to the brace (18 hours/day) and had stayed at 18/20 until this past summer when they jumped to 29/24. Basically, she outgrew her brace and unfortunately it was in between her checkups. So, she got a new brace...recently she broke her leg and has actually gotten tons of time in her brace.

I'm telling you all of this to let you know that yes you should be concerned but I think you need more specific information, especially in regards to where she falls on that Risser scale. Treating with the brace can be effective if used as prescribed but it can be difficult emotionally. The fact that you can "see" the scoliosis is a concern ... it might be a good idea to get a second opinion. It seems like there is a wide range of opinion/course of treatment throughout the world, but here in our little corner (Philadelphia area) the general consensus is to brace at 25 degrees and anything under is a watch and wait. Unfortunately there is no crystal ball ... some curves don't increase beyond a certain point. But, I have been told that the higher the curve goes the more chance it will continue to increase.

I think the important thing is to trust your own instincts and intuition. If you're not comfortable with the current situation, then get another opinion but be sure to ask very specific questions. (I know in the beginning it's hard to know what these are.) I hope this helps a bit...my prayers are with you and your daughter. -Attie

cloggerx3
11-07-2005, 10:07 PM
i dont know if anybody will still read this thread, but::

I am worrier's daughter, the 14 year old. We ended up getting me a SpineCor brace. I have had it for a week, and it is already working wonders :) Sorry for the "heated discussion" this situation has caused lol. I definitely would recomend this brace @ low curves (or degrees or whatever).

Joe's Mom
11-08-2005, 03:20 PM
I have worked in health care for over 30 years now. I started working in the days when the only thing insurance covered were major surgeries and overnight hospital stays. They didn't cover things like braces or outpatient services then. People paid for these things themselves.

Now 30 years later, all sorts of things are covered by insurance and copayments.

I suspect this pendulum is starting to swing back again to less insurance coverage and more private pay. But the providers have not readjusted yet.

I will say that when insurance coverage is not/was not available the COST of goods and services was/is less than when 3rd party coverage is available. I know that when insurance began covering therapy services in the late 1970's our director was instructed to inflate/increase fees by 20% as the insurance was only paying 80% of what was charged. That way, the 80% collected was in fact the "real" amount of the service, for a short while anyhow! Fees inflated dramatically soon thereafter. And the fees have continued to increase all along.

It is really difficult to determine exactly what a health care service or product really costs these days. What is charged is often NOT the same amount that is paid by 3rd party payors. The amount(s) paid are often quite different depending upon the contract each company has with the health care institutions and they are almost never what is listed as the "cost" by the facility. The last hospital I worked for charged almost $200 an hour for therapy services. In reality, they collected around $75-100 max per hour from any 3rd party payor, but there were individuals who privated paid for therapy . . some were actually charged the full fee, some were given a "discount" of 10-15% if they paid up front ($20-30.00 off a $200 fee is still WAY more than the insurance companies were charged/paid). And the real amount collected was often a closely guarded secret!

Personally, I don't think providing braces to kids with spinal curves who may/will benefit from them will bankrupt any insurance company or health care system. Utilization of health care services and goods isn't the problem . . . run away "costs" and indeterminant "costs" and "costs" that are driven upwards to support hosts of mid level management, TV commercials, inflated CEO salaries, and the like . . now that may be something to look at.

Cost benefit analysis is a very challenging task . . . and sometimes the cost of doing nothing in the long run can be quite high.

marmyte
11-08-2005, 04:21 PM
Cost benefit analysis is a very challenging task . . . and sometimes the cost of doing nothing in the long run can be quite high.
right there you've hit the nail on the head :) unfortunately i know several people with scoliosis who can support this statement and i feel very lucky that i'm not one of them

nikyergen
11-09-2005, 02:18 AM
Worrier--I am so sorry you have had to go through all these heated discussions. I have three daughters, all with scoliosis. My 17 yo had surgery for hers last March, 2005. She was in extreme pain before surgery and does say that she still hurts, but not like she used to. She does more activities than she used to. My 15 year old daughter was a wait and watch. That is exactly what we did. She saw the doctor on the 27th of October and was told that nothing is progressing or changing. My 13 year old daughter wears a brace. By the time she gets out of it, she will have spent two years in it. But, it has payed off. The doctor is really seeing a lot of improvement in her back. So, to have a brace, wait and watch, or surgery. I can't tell you what to do, as I have all three scenarios at my house, but if you aren't comfortable with things, get a second opinion. Have you checked out Shriners Hospital. Incredible hospital and doctors. They are all over the country. Be sure that your second opinion comes from a doctor that is a pediatric orthopedic surgeon that specializes in spinal deformaties.

To your wonderful daughter--Keep you chin up and wear that brace like you are supposed to. My 17 year old would of loved to of had a chance at a brace before directly going to surgery. Her curve was at 88 degrees when she was diagnosed, so a brace was never an option. She is an athlete and is sitting out of her favorite sport, Basketball, her junior year in high school. She says she is okay with it, but I am sure it hurts to see her team out there practicing and playing and she can't participate.

To both Worrier and her wonderful daughter--Don't wrap yourself in bubble wrap. Keep up any normal activities. None of them need to be cut out. All three of my girls play post positions in Basketball, the middle one also does track and field, and the youngest one plays volleyball, and their backs haven't slowed them down. This is in addition to having the life of being a Rancher's daughter and livestock and rodeo as a very important part of their lives. Stay active and stay in shape. Keep your muscles toned up.

I hope this encourages you.

Again, I am so sorry you got caught up in a heated discussion. You just really need some reassurances and I hope I could enlighten you a little bit.

God Bless You Both,

Nikki

cloggerx3
11-09-2005, 10:14 PM
Nikki-

Thank you very much for the encouraging advice. I know that i am very lucky to be caught somewhat early. I am keeping up with my normal activities, which contain marching band, clogging (not hillbilly style :D lol), and sometimes running. Good luck with your daughter's, hope ur 15yr old doesnt have to get a brace or surgery, and i hope ur 17yr old can get back in the game soon, and that ur 13 yr old wears the brace as told, just as i will :) . Thanks again for the encouragement.

>> LAuren (the daughter)

just asking...
11-10-2005, 03:40 PM
i have a question similar to this so maybe i can ask it here..

my daughter ,15, went for a doctors check-up and the doctor said she had a slight case of scoliosis. she said that she has a slight curve and she may grow out of it. she also said that she dosent at this point need a brace or surgery but she should be checked about every 4 months or so to see hows its doing. about a week after the appointment my daughter started complaining of back pain in her lower back. could this be associated with scoliosis or something else? the pain is starting to go away but should i still be concerned?

nikyergen
11-10-2005, 03:52 PM
Just Asking-Did you take your daughter to a GP or an Pediatric Orthopedic Specialist. There is a huge difference. My daughter had a significant amount of pain. Some will tell you there is no pain associated with scoliosis. We feel differently about it, simply because of personal experience. The first thing I would do is take your daughter to a Pediatric Orthopedic Specialist. Contact Shriners Hospital. You don't need a referral, give them a call and you can do the application over the phone. They have hospitals all over the US. Shriners is a Pediatric Orthopedic Hospital. There are lots of other benefits too. There is no charge for their services regardless of how much you make or how expensive the treatments may be, and your child receives treatment until the age of 21, if they are diagnosed before their 18th birthday. If you feel it is cost prohibitive for you to drive to your nearest Shriners Hospital, get hold of you local Shrine club and ask for assistance. They will assist in your gas/diesel, motel room, if you need one, and possibly meals if you need that too. Your daughter may well be done growing and her curves may not get any worse. Did the doctor tell you what degree her curves were. However, she will not grow out of it. As you saw in my previous post, we have three girls with scoliosis issues. All with different treatments. Hopefully, your daughter is done growing and her curves have stabilized and won't get any worse. But, do have her checked by a specialist. And, yes, a person can experience pain from scoliosis.

Nikki

Attie
11-10-2005, 11:09 PM
Just asking...keep asking questions! I agree with Nikki...make sure your daughter is evaluated and diagnosed by a pediatric ortho who specializes in scoliosis. Reading your post I'm guessing it was her pediatrician who caught it? My daughter's pediatrician was the one who first caught her scoliosis during a routine exam and immediately sent us for an x-ray. (That was 2 years ago, 3 braces ago.) The way she caught it was by doing a visual check where my daughter stood with her feet together and bent at the waist with her arms hanging down towards the floor. We could "see" a difference in the symmetry of her back. Her curves were 17 at that point which is not that high but she began being seen by the specialist.

I'm not familiar with Shriner's first hand but it sounds like a good place and I've read about alot of kids receiving treatment there. Depending on your location I can recommend from experience the DuPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware... it is excellent.

This can be so overwhelming and in the beginning it's hard to know just what to ask. Hopefully you won't need too many of these questions! Did your daughter have an x-ray, where is the curve (or curves), and what is the degree of curvature? Since your daughter is 15 an important question is how long ago did she start her cycle? Another important questions is where does she fall on the Risser scale which is used to determine skeletal maturity. As far as I know from our experience that can only be determined from the x-ray that shows the growth plate in the hip. When that is "filled in" and she reaches a Risser 5 she would be considered done growing (as long as there is no change in her height for a while, too).

It does seem like kids do have pain associated with their scoliosis even though up to now my daughter has not, thankfully. I would think it's better to err on the side of caution...a simple x-ray will answer many of the questions and give you a better idea of what's going on and where you need to go from here.

As I said, it can be very overwhelming and confusing, but sites like this one can be very supportive as well as informative. I hope all turns out well for your daughter! -Attie

just asking...
11-14-2005, 04:04 PM
thanks to both of you who replied. My daughter's pediatricition caught the curve but did not tell us to get it measured. She instead said to get routine check ups about every 4-6 months on the curve to see if it gets worse and if she will need bracing. She said that she did not need bracing or surgery at this point but should I should still get her curve measured?. She started her cycle at 13. and also if I should get the measure of her curve should I go to her pediatrician or a different doctor? thanks again.

marmyte
11-14-2005, 04:18 PM
get the curve measured, and get it measured by a paediatric orthopaedic surgeon who specialises in scoliosis. make sure any xrays (unless they're bending ones) are taken standing up and don't let the radiologist try and manipulate her hips to get her to stand straighter, as this will make the xrays inaccurate. you need to know the degrees of curves - how else do you know whether or not they're progressing? ask the surgeon for her risser sign - this is a scale of 0-5 relating to how much space there is left in a growth plate and how you can get a rough calculation on how much longer your daughter will grow for. good luck :)

nikyergen
11-14-2005, 09:00 PM
Just Asking-Use a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. You need to know the curves and risser score. They are so important. Your pediatrician doesn't know enough about scoli, and ours didn't either, to be able to track it. If caught early enough, a brace can slow down curves, and this is much better than surgery.

If you are in the U.S., you may want to look into Shriners Hospitals. Scoliosis treatment can get very expensive and they do all of their services for free to the children, regardless of the family income. They also specialize in spinal deformities. Check them out, or any good pediatric orthopedic surgeon.

Nikki

Attie
11-15-2005, 09:56 AM
Just asking...reading the replies to your original post I think the message everyone, including myself, is giving you is solid advice. Even if your pediatrician isn't recommending your daughter to see a specialist and is willing to take a wait and see approach it would be in your daughter's best interests to get the x-ray and have a pediatric ortho who specializes in scoliosis (not just a general ortho) evaluate the situation. IF he/she says to monitor the situation and re-check in 4-6 months, fine. But, I agree with everyone else that recommendation needs to be made by a specialist.

Don't be put off by your pediatrician. Even though the fact that your daughter is 2 years past the beginning of her cycle, which is a good sign as maybe she is close to skeletal maturity, it would be better to KNOW what the curves are now and where she falls on the Risser scale and thse things can ONLY be determined by an x-ray and qualified scoliosis specialist. I have found that there can be a difference in the curve measurement depending on who reads the x-ray and measures the curve. After 3 years I choose to put my trust in my daughter's ortho who specializes in scoliosis rather than the radiologist. It's not that the radiologist isn't competent, but the scoliosis doctor just deals with scoliosis.

I hope that your pediatrician isn't making his/her recommendation on a financial basis. I would press the point with him/her that it is just the cost of an x-ray and a doctor's appointment and insist on it. There is a HUGE difference between hoping that everything is and will be okay and KNOWING what the situation is.

Let us know how you make out. Let's hope for the best, but know that there's alot of support if you need it. My prayers are with you and your daughter. -Attie

just asking...
11-15-2005, 04:52 PM
Thanks to everyone who gave advice. I see now that I should get her curves measured just in case. I will let you know how she's doing after the appt.
:)