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richardis
02-20-2017, 12:43 AM
I found this: https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Complex-Regional-Pain-Syndrome-Fact-Sheet
"Limb trauma, such as a fracture, followed by immobilization in a cast, is the most common cause of CRPS (complex regional pain syndrome)"
The connection is clear to me although some of you will disagree.

you may find that helpful. I hope it helps.

Pooka1
02-20-2017, 09:35 AM
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27379420


Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2016 Jul 1. [Epub ahead of print]
A Silver Medal Winner at the 13th World Wu Shu Championship 2015 17 months after Selective Thoracic Fusion for AIS: A Case Report.
Chan CY1, Aziz I, Chai FW, Kwan MK.
Author information
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN:
Case Report.
OBJECTIVE:
To report the successful rehabilitation and the training progress of an elite high performance martial art exponent after selective thoracic fusion for AIS.
SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:
Posterior Spinal Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) will result in loss of spinal flexibility. The process of rehabilitation following posterior spinal fusion for AIS remains controversial and there are few reports of return to elite sports performance following posterior spinal fusion for AIS.
METHODS:
We report a case of a 25-year-old lady who was a national Wu Shu exponent. She was a Taolu (Exhibition) exponent. She underwent Selective Thoracic Fusion (T4 to T12) using alternate level pedicle screw placement augmented with autogenous local bone graft in June 2014. She commenced her training at 3-month post surgery and the intensity of her training was increased after 6 months post surgery. We followed her up to 2 years post surgery and showed no instrumentation failure or lost of correction.
RESULTS:
Following selective thoracic fusion, her training process consisted of mainly speed training, core strengthening, limb strengthening and flexibility exercises. At 17 months of post operation, she participated in 13 World Wu Shu Championship 2015 and won the silver medal.
CONCLUSION:
Return to elite high performance martial arts sports was possible following selective thoracic fusion for AIS. The accelerated and intensive training regime did not lead to any instrumentation failure and complications.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:
2.

titaniumed
02-20-2017, 12:04 PM
There was only 1 Chinese silver awarded to the women
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2015_World_Wushu_Championships

Liu xuxu video I think this is her
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPqDEUTmQZY

I think Douglas Fairbanks as Zorro would have met his match! LOL

All joking aside, my efforts and physical therapy on my shoulder (at 10 months) was a new awakening, or breakthrough on mobility of the upper body. The use of the arm bike pedaling with my arms started with no resistance. I had to stay determined as the movement of muscles in the surgical zone was uncomfortable at first, continuing until the soft tissues toughened up.

We start with walking in our recoveries, but eventually the upper body needs to be addressed. Not necessarily strength training, but mobility and full range of motion which is so helpful.

Stay active!

Ed

richardis
02-20-2017, 12:12 PM
what bothers me the most is to have to type with both arms on a keyboard, or on a keyboard and a mouse. It feels different now and it comes with pain that I had never felt before op.

Edit: before the op the pain was concentrated on one area, now the pain has changed location

richardis
02-26-2017, 06:13 PM
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27379420

I am sorry Pooka, but that study seems like a sensationalist scientific-study. I do believe in the super-human effort of that girl.

Although, the conclusion of the study is flawed, and correlation is not causation. The conclusion was: "Return to elite high performance martial arts sports was possible following selective thoracic fusion for AIS." The thing is: why did they do that study? A medal was enough to get to that conclusion. What I wanted to know was the train regime of her vs the train regime of her colleagues. Did she train harder than those with normal spines ?

Although, the other conclusion is of interest: "The accelerated and intensive training regime did not lead to any instrumentation failure and complications."

My take-away message from the the study is: ok, I now know I can do it without damaging my hardware but that does not mean it will be easier for me than for those who compete with me.

I used to be one of the best students on my PE classes on high-school, mainly at endurance running but that was because I worked harder and I struggled way more than them. If they trained as hard as I did they would beat me easily.

I had no hardware in my back at that time and my scoliosis was moderate ( my curve was very atypical to be frank- I had almost no compensatory curve. Later my curve became severe - my curve developed on my thorax and was confined to a very few vertebraes. That made the surgery more difficult to plan because the ribs were deformed to a greater extent than those who have long curves with this magnitude of angle - the longer and smaller the curve (if thoracic) in terms of vertebrae the less deformed the ribs).

And, as I now know scoliosis surgery will only correct the deformity of the spine. The ribs will continue deformed- there is a little degree of correction that surgeons could achieve to get to the normal circle and semi-ellipse shape of the ribs. And here, I am not even talking only about the rib hump. The more deformed the ribs before surgery, the higher the odds that your shoulders will be uneven after surgery.

If the curve is lumbar, surgeons could achieve a greater correction- the upside of lumbar curves is that there are no ribs there, so they could indeed correct everything- the lumbar spine itself- as there are no ribs. The downside is that you loose a lot more mobility.

As for pain, the topic of this thread, I do remember having pain way before I was diagnosed with scoliosis. Of course, scoliosis was already in my body. And let me tell you: scoliosis did have a great impact on my life. Before scoliosis I was the child that every mom would be proud of: top of my class in every subject and I did excel in everything I did, curricular and extra-curricular activities. Everyone would like to be like me back then and I had it all. Then with scoliosis came pain and my life did get a lot more difficult.

As pain sets in it messes with your brain, and the pain pathways are in constant activity. The central nervous system gets the messages of pain so it disrupts your ability to concentrate. That's why most people who have scoliosis has mental health problems- neural pathways are altered as messages of pain reach the brain. It is all connected. The central nervous system, the brain stem, the spinal cord, the nerves and the muscles (which have a nerve supply otherwise you will lose the ability to contract them at your will). When they say : -you are nervous, they really mean it. The nerves are in over-activity and are sending and receiving messages from and to the brain.


Doctors usually prescribe muscle relaxants, which are very similiar to the well-known xanax, which is a central nervous system depressant. They are supposed to calm the nerves that supply your muscles. That's why your muscles become relaxed after you take a pill.

It is way too early in my recovery to tell if surgery has soothed my pain significantly.

susancook
02-28-2017, 03:41 AM
[QUOTE=richardis;168739]I am sorry Pooka, but that study seems like a sensationalist scientific-study. I do believe in the super-human effort of that girl.

Although, the conclusion of the study is flawed, and correlation is not causation. The conclusion was: "Return to elite high performance martial arts sports was possible following selective thoracic fusion for AIS." The thing is: why did they do that study? A medal was enough to get to that conclusion. What I wanted to know was the train regime of her vs the train regime of her colleagues. Did she train harder than those with normal spines ?

Although, the other conclusion is of interest: "The accelerated and intensive training regime did not lead to any instrumentation failure and complications."




This is a Case Report. It is not a scientific study. The conclusion seems appropriate for the info provided in the abstract. It is not a research study. It is a case report.

Susan