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richardis
07-08-2016, 05:01 PM
My surgeon has used bone graft he took from osteotomies done on my own spinous processes. My understanding is that he didn't do further damage to the spine to use bone, he simply has reutilized the bone who otherwise would be wasted. He used bone cut to realign the spine and correct the deformity.
I was surprised because it was not taken from the hip or the iliac crest.

Anyone out there who have had surgery having this same bone graft technique?
So far, it seems successful.

LindaRacine
07-08-2016, 09:11 PM
My surgeon has used bone graft he took from osteotomies done on my own spinous processes. My understanding is that he didn't do further damage to the spine to use bone, he simply has reutilized the bone who otherwise would be wasted. He used bone cut to realign the spine and correct the deformity.
I was surprised because it was not taken from the hip or the iliac crest.

Anyone out there who have had surgery having this same bone graft technique?
So far, it seems successful.

This occurs in all spinal fusion surgeries. In some cases, there's not enough "local bone", so the surgeon uses other allograft or autograft or other substitutes to supplement.

--Linda

richardis
07-09-2016, 07:07 PM
This occurs in all spinal fusion surgeries. In some cases, there's not enough "local bone", so the surgeon uses other allograft or autograft or other substitutes to supplement.

--Linda

Can you cite your sources? From the books that I have read it is not common.

They both refer allograft or autograft as an aid to stimulate bone growth.
I was surprised by your confident response.

Pooka1
07-09-2016, 08:40 PM
As far as I know, everyone has these spiny protuberances removed as a source for bone rather than take it from the iliac crest. I am very certain that was done with both my daughters. I am very grateful they did not take iliac bone before I was knowledgeable enough to disallow the procedure. Dodged a huge bullet.

richardis
07-09-2016, 09:05 PM
As far as I know, everyone has these spiny protuberances removed as a source for bone rather than take it from the iliac crest. I am very certain that was done with both my daughters. I am very grateful they did not take iliac bone before I was knowledgeable enough to disallow the procedure. Dodged a huge bullet.


Great. Who was the surgeon of your daughters?

How hard was the recovery for your children? when were them off pain medication?

jackieg412
07-09-2016, 09:24 PM
My surgeon used that technique. He also used the artificial bone but mostly just the bone taken from the surgery process. He did the same for my cervical surgery. I thought it was a common practice.

Pooka1
07-09-2016, 09:43 PM
My daughters were fused by a pediatric orthopedic surgeon in Raleigh.

The were off pain meds when the script ran out (~14 days as I recall) but went onto over the counter for a bit after that. They were both back in school full time between 3 and 4 weeks post op. The surgeon does not write home school paperwork because he says most of the kids are back in school before it kicks in, usually if he kid is expected to be out 6 weeks or more as far as I know in this county.

Kids recover at lighting speed form even long fusions.

LindaRacine
07-09-2016, 09:47 PM
Can you cite your sources? From the books that I have read it is not common.

They both refer allograft or autograft as an aid to stimulate bone growth.
I was surprised by your confident response.

I work in the UCSF Spine Center, and have chart reviewed literally thousands of surgery notes. I can't remember ever reading a note for a fusion surgery where local bone wasn't utilized.

What books show that it's uncommon?

--Linda

richardis
07-09-2016, 10:46 PM
I work in the UCSF Spine Center, and have chart reviewed literally thousands of surgery notes. I can't remember ever reading a note for a fusion surgery where local bone wasn't utilized.

What books show that it's uncommon?

--Linda

I bought books from Amazon but I admit they must be outdated despite they were revised on 2010 or so. Anyway, all the most regarded websites still talk about those bone graft techniques. I am not saying that bone cut is not reutilized by most surgeons. I am saying that they are inclined to grab bone from other parts of the body or from a donor's bank to stimulate growth. A few, do use the most advanced techniques.

Thanks for your insight.

Let me question you this:

- How often do you see loss of correction after five months of surgery due to the slow fusing process or failed instrumentation support?

- At five months post-op what are my chances of being fused?

- the first levels to fuse should be the ones in the middle of the curve?

richardis
07-09-2016, 11:11 PM
http://www.spine-health.com/treatment/spinal-fusion/how-electrical-bone-growth-stimulator-helps-spine-fusion


http://www.spine-health.com/treatment/spinal-fusion/bone-graft-spine-fusion

have a look on the above mentioned url's

Can I put a tens machine on the incision to stimulate bone growth? this is just a thought-provoking question.

mabeckoff
07-10-2016, 01:03 AM
A TENS unit is for pain. A bone growth stimulator will grow bone.

richardis
07-10-2016, 01:47 AM
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation Unit: do you use it on the incision?

Anyway, it carries electricity, the same foundation that the bone growth stimulator uses.

jackieg412
07-10-2016, 08:04 AM
I have both but I don't think they are interchangeable

LindaRacine
07-10-2016, 04:40 PM
I bought books from Amazon but I admit they must be outdated despite they were revised on 2010 or so. Anyway, all the most regarded websites still talk about those bone graft techniques. I am not saying that bone cut is not reutilized by most surgeons. I am saying that they are inclined to grab bone from other parts of the body or from a donor's bank to stimulate growth. A few, do use the most advanced techniques.

Thanks for your insight.

Let me question you this:

- How often do you see loss of correction after five months of surgery due to the slow fusing process or failed instrumentation support?

- At five months post-op what are my chances of being fused?

- the first levels to fuse should be the ones in the middle of the curve?

Sorry, those questions are way too specific.

At 5 months, your fusions should be well on their way. My recommendation would be to not obsess about it. You can have non-union problems as early as a few months post-op, to many years post-op.

Focus on having a good outcome and being able to do anything you want in the near future. Whatever percentage of people who have issues, you're personally more likely to have a good long-term outcome.

--Linda