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Tableone
06-30-2014, 04:47 PM
http://www.hss.edu/professional-conditions_adult-scoliosis-low-lumbar-degenerative-disease-spinal-stenosis.asp#.U7HS4qjY9N0

This is a very detailed article on Adult Scoliosis Surgery. There is also an interesting section at the end about different types of pain.

rohrer01
06-30-2014, 08:12 PM
Interesting! Dr. Boachie is operating on people in their 40's with mild to moderate scoliosis in the thoracic spine to treat low back pain. It's something to think about. He commented on the degeneration process and this being the time to operate,...before the degeneration gets worse.

jrnyc
06-30-2014, 09:14 PM
date on this, at the end, is 2009...
things change...
back when i went to Boachie for a consult, he was still collapsing
a lung to get to the spine...
that was around.....i think 2004....

just trying to point out that the good doctor has changed his
procedures...and maybe his outlook...on scoliosis over the years...

jess...and Sparky

Karen Ocker
07-03-2014, 06:39 AM
Dr. Boachie is retiring. His office is sending me my records on a disk.
I add I am 12 years post op and still pain free-at age 72.

susancook
07-03-2014, 08:45 PM
Very interesting presentation. Thanks or posting it. Susan

LindaRacine
07-03-2014, 08:55 PM
All good deformity surgeons have changed what they do. Though there is still much to learn, they know considerably more now than they did 10 years ago.

I'm guessing people are getting tired of me posting this, but curve degrees are of very little importance in adult deformity. Someone can have a very small curve, but need a long fusion because they have things like degenerative discs, stenosis, etc.

Be careful about thinking that a surgeon does the same thing every time, or that because one surgeon does something, that other surgeons do the same. There's a lot that we don't know about each case shown.

--Linda

tae_tap
07-03-2014, 10:48 PM
All good deformity surgeons have changed what they do. Though there is still much to learn, they know considerably more now than they did 10 years ago. I'm guessing people are getting tired of me posting this, but curve degrees are of very little importance in adult deformity. Someone can have a very small curve, but need a long fusion because they have things like degenerative discs, stenosis, etc. Be careful about thinking that a surgeon does the same thing every time, or that because one surgeon does something, that other surgeons do the same. There's a lot that we don't know about each case shown. --Linda

I agree 100%! Every single case is different and trying to compare one to another us tough.

jrnyc
07-04-2014, 02:27 AM
Linda...
i can't tell you how many doctors told me over the years...
(and one was supposed to be a TOP guy at Sloan Kettering
in Manhattan)...about what conditions
"shouldn't hurt that much..."
or "don't hurt that much"
or "aren't supposed to hurt that much..."

that goes for scoliosis, Lyme, herniated discs after a certain
period of time, and a benign tumor....
because some medical text book somewhere said so...
obviously, doctors are NOT being trained to listen to and
BELIEVE what their patients tell them...
shame on all of them...
and i have met too many of them...of all ages, both genders
(but mostly male) and in many hospitals.

jess...and Sparky

titaniumed
07-04-2014, 12:58 PM
All good deformity surgeons have changed what they do. Though there is still much to learn, they know considerably more now than they did 10 years ago.
This puts tears of joy on my face....and its good to have you doing what you do for us Linda. and of course the whole gang at UCSF.

Thank you

Ed

LindaRacine
07-05-2014, 12:35 PM
Thanks, as always, Ed.