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springchicken
03-05-2014, 02:41 PM
Hi all-

Question for those who had physical therapy after surgery. Did you find it useful? Could you give examples of some of the exercises you did, the more specific the better?

I was thinking of looking into PT, but it won't be easy for me to schedule-wise, so I wanted to see if people found it worth it. I might just continue on my own at the gym, still debating.

(I've done PT before for my back and found it helpful to a point...the massage work is always nice!)

Many thanks!
Olivia

Wish2bstraight
03-07-2014, 05:10 PM
I had physical therapy at home and then I went out for physical therapy after my surgery. Fused from t9 to s1. I do bracing, squeeze a ball between my knees, different leg lifts with ankle weights. I also do what is called 4's and 8's, and deep knee bends, which sometimes bother my knees. I also do some exercises with resistant bands. Yes, they help.

I started doing them on my bed, but now a year after my surgery, I am able to get on an exercise mat on the floor.

I firmly believe that they help. I feel much better after I do them, even though I hate exercising.

susancook
03-07-2014, 10:29 PM
Hi Olivia, I started going to PT immediately after the rehab hospital. Early PT was very gentle movements. PT focuses on areas of weakness. For me, it is strength in my R leg and quad strength mostly. Exercises are holding on to my kitchen sink and bending my knees and squatting about half way down and then straightening up. I repeat that about 30 times. I also inch my R foot up my L leg.

Walking is excellent exercise. Buy a pedometer which is motivational.

I started having cervical problems so bring my chin to my chest while keeping my neck sort of toward the back. I also do isometric neck exercises.

I do warm water exercises that involve no twisting or bending.

The good thing about having a PT that KNOWS about exercises for people with a spinal fusion is that the PT can show you how to do the exercises correctly to preserve your fusion.

Good luck, Susan

mabeckoff
03-07-2014, 10:53 PM
Your surgeon will not allow you to just go to the gym. You need PT designed for your surgery.

Irina
03-08-2014, 12:13 AM
Your surgeon will not allow you to just go to the gym. You need PT designed for your surgery.

Melissa, so good to see you!

JenniferG
03-08-2014, 04:16 AM
My surgeon was adamant I should not have PT after surgery. I suspect the reason was that he didn't trust any PT in my area.

Susie*Bee
03-08-2014, 08:28 AM
Hi Olivia! I will just reiterate what others have said... After my initial PT right after surgery with some very basic and simple exercises (like raising up on toes and returning, some flexible band stretching for my arms, etc.) I was not allowed by my surgeon to have any more PT for awhile. Just walking-- and walking and walking. At 6 months I had PT to strengthen my arms and legs and at 11 months I had PT to strengthen my core. My surgeon was reluctant but sent information about what I was NOT to do. The PT helped me a lot as I had grown weak as a kitten from the surgery and from wearing a brace for 5 months. You really do need approval from your surgeon and a PT who knows what he/she is doing with someone who is recovering from fusion surgery. Best wishes!

springchicken
03-08-2014, 03:17 PM
Thank you so much everyone for your responses. I'm awaiting a call back from my surgeon's assistant so I can get a PT script and hopefully get some relief. I too was wary of going to a PT who wasn't familiar enough with scoliosis, but I think I found a place.

My doctor left it up for me to decide whether I wanted it or not. Sounds like every surgeon is different and every case is different. He told me to see how I feel after 6 weeks. I'll be 9 weeks this Monday and I still just have a lot of pain trying to sit.

Trying to give it time and be patient, though. I'm walking a lot and I've noticed I'm gradually walking faster and easier. I think the progress is so small you don't always see it, but I keep a journal to record something positive each week.

I also found some great exercise videos that a forum member Doreen posted to her blog (Doreen if you're out there-thanks!! :)

Thanks again everyone
Olivia

leahdragonfly
03-08-2014, 03:53 PM
Hi Olivia,

I hope you have luck finding an experienced PT who is really familiar with fusion, and mindful of your activity restrictions. You mention hoping you can find some relief--is there something in particular you are looking for relief for? Or is it general aches and pains? I definitely had significant "aches and pains" still until at least the 6 month point, when they started to get significantly better.

I had trouble finding suitable PT after my surgery. My surgery was done in Portland, OR, but I live 2 hours away in a town of 50,000. I tried one PT office at around 9-10 weeks post-op and was quite shocked that the PT really did not seem to understand or respect my activity restrictions, nor the nature of the long fusion. He wanted to assign me exercises that clearly violated my "no bending" restrictions (such as exercising on hands and knees with lifting arms and legs alternately) and then argued with me that they didn't really violate my restrictions. It was upsetting, and I told the PT I was not going to do the exercises until I cleared them with my surgeon. When I showed the exercise sheet to my surgeon he was pretty upset and said he did not want me doing any type of exercise like that so early on. He advised me to not have PT since there wasn't a good skilled option in my area.

The PT department where I had my surgery was just great, and I wish I could have worked with them, but I live too far away. In the end I just walked, and did gentle swimming. It worked out for me. Everyone has a different experience, depending on their surgery and the availability of skilled PT.

LindaRacine
03-09-2014, 12:52 AM
He wanted to assign me exercises that clearly violated my "no bending" restrictions (such as exercising on hands and knees with lifting arms and legs alternately) and then argued with me that they didn't really violate my restrictions. It was upsetting, and I told the PT I was not going to do the exercises until I cleared them with my surgeon. When I showed the exercise sheet to my surgeon he was pretty upset and said he did not want me doing any type of exercise like that so early on. He advised me to not have PT since there wasn't a good skilled option in my area.

Ack! That's so upsetting. There is an incredible range of knowledge among physical therapists. Before my first scoliosis surgeries, I tried several rounds of physical therapy. Nothing helped, and in fact, I think some might have actually been detrimental. When I finally found a good physical therapist, I was really shocked at how different she was from the other therapists with whom I had worked. My only advice to anyone who has been left to find a physical therapist on their own is to see if you can find someone specialized in spine and/or find some with a PhD in physical therapy.

--Linda

springchicken
03-09-2014, 03:02 PM
Gayle, your experience with PT after surgery sounds like it was terrible. Thank goodness you didn't stay with them. I too wish I could do PT in Philadelphia under the direct guidance of my surgeon, but it's too far. We'll see what his assistant says. As I mentioned, I think I may have found a place where I live that has experienced therapists.

As far as what I'm looking for--sitting is just so unbearable for me. My pain is decreasing despite that, but I'm just really nervous that when I have to go in to work I'll be in agony. But maybe by the end of this month things will be better for me.

I will say I went to sit in the hot tub and "walked" in the pool at my gym for the first time and it was glorious! Man, I wish I had a hot tub. :)

leahdragonfly
03-09-2014, 05:08 PM
Hi,

Many of us have had issues with sitting for awhile after surgery, especially those fused to sacrum and with pelvic fixation. Sitting was not a position of comfort for me at all for a long time (at least 6 months post-op I'd say). When I returned to work at 14 weeks I could not sit for more than 30-60 minutes max, and even then it was not comfortable. I got up a lot, and went for short walks every hour if possible. It does improve over time, and I am sure over the next few months things will get easier for you, also. Remember to not over do itÖyou will pay later!

I am sure the pool felt wonderful. I am a swimmer and I recall my daily visit to the pool and hot tub was the best part of the day.

springchicken
03-09-2014, 06:31 PM
Thanks, Gayle. It's good to keep things in perspective and comforting to know that others had similar experiences. Sitting for long periods of time was always hard for me pre-surgery. The hard part is that when I finally do go into work I will have an hour and 20 minute train ride (almost 2 hours door to door) but I'll just have to work standing up for part of the day and be thankful I work from home most days.

Thanks again for your messages.

titaniumed
03-10-2014, 02:07 AM
Sitting is hard, but it does get better in time.....I used a laptop at the kitchen counter quite a bit in the early days....

Soft tissues take a long time to heal and can be agitated or inflamed pretty far out from the surgery date. I had a major pain episode at 22 months from pulling down to tie shoe laces. That was extremely painful for 14 days, then suddenly quit on its own. Thankfully I have not had a major pain event since that time in my fusion area.

I didnít have a PT program for my spine other than walking and doing heel lifts (for DVT) standing in the kitchen. With the medications I was on, I know I wasnít about to drive a car, let alone go someplace and do too much. It was basically about moving often.....I also knew I had to wean off my meds and had to put an effort into that which wasnít an easy thing....Man-o-man! I quit cold turkey at 6 wks since I wanted my mind back, and it took 2 attempts. I also needed to drive.

I took 5 one hour hot soaks in 106 degree (scalding) water for pain each day for 3 months. I had a fancy hot tub with all the bells and whistles but was afraid of falling getting in or out of it, so I used the master bedroom tub which is a large tub with a sloped back. If you do this, drink plenty of water as you lose quite a bit soaking in hot water and dehydration is a total disaster. It will send you back to the hospital. Drinking or sipping water all day long is so important. I have had 2 co-workers end up in the hospital because of dehydration, and they were not doing a surgical recovery!

I broke my shoulder 10 days before my scoli surgeries and had that surgery done 8 months after my scoli surgeries. My shoulder surgeon wanted me in PT for the shoulder right away, and did that for 6 months. At that stage, I have to say that the physical therapy was extremely helpful and was doing 20 pull ups after 1 year. The arm bike was great for the paraspinalís in the thoracic. I really wanted to know if I was fused since non-unions are one of our worries. I didnít lift more than a dinner plate for 6 months because of this. Since I knew that it takes a long time (12 months) for bone to fuse, I wanted to take it easy in my recovery since I had one shot at it.

You can see that I took it slow.....and knew that my recovery was going to take 2 years and thatís what it took. I knew this since a friend had a major (fake) aorta procedure from the front and it took him 2 years to recover.....90% in the 1st year, the final 10% took another year. (Battling fatigue).

I donít think there was anything I could have done to speed up my recovery.....it happened at its own pace....I also had 4 surgeries in 2 years so that slowed things down a little....

You will see me ending many of my posts with ďHang in thereĒ and ďTake it easyĒ. Now you know why....

Take it easy

Ed

springchicken
03-15-2014, 01:05 PM
Thanks for your post, Ed. I thought I had replied but I don't see it here. I'm amazed you were able to quit your meds so early given the pain you had. I basically decreased mine until I no longer had stomach problems. The dose is so low I'm not sure it does much but I'm not quite ready to give up completely.

I bought one of those foam cushions for sitting which helps a bit. I'm taking your advice and going a little easier on myself.

Thanks,
Olivia

Ps so envious of yr hot tub!!

titaniumed
03-16-2014, 12:27 AM
Your welcome...

I think of healing like having a kitchen knife cut. It takes a while to heal, after a month it feels better, but if you hit it with a hammer, it has a tendency to really slow the healing process down. (smiley face) I have done this!

We all fall at some point....but you donít want to fall now. Later is ok, only after you are healed.

Recovery is a slow calculated balancing act.

Skiing is similar if out of shape.....The 1st day should be short, like 2 hours, then skiing times increased slowly over a few skiing days. If I go out and ski hard with the soft tissues out of shape, I could do a lot of damage in the beginning of the season and possibly kill the whole ski season with an injury.

Ed

springchicken
06-20-2014, 07:32 AM
hi all,

i'm almost 6 mos post-op. physical therapy was very good for me (mainly for slowing me down a bit!) but then i sort of plateaued. my therapist suggested i take a break for a while so i can get used to going back into work. it's such a long commute that each time i go in i have to recover for a couple days after.

feeling pretty down lately that i seem to be recovering so slowly. i hope it's normal to plateau at this stage... i walk about 5 miles a day, but god forbid there are some hills in there (which is hard to avoid sometimes) because it flares up this nerve pain in my hip that shoots down my leg.

is it normal to still have to take tylenol every day?

thanks for listening,
spring

tae_tap
06-20-2014, 08:37 AM
Five miles! That is amazing! I am 7 months post-op and am doing PT for the last four weeks, but there is no way I can do five miles (and I thought my healing is going great!) I am lucky to get a half a mile before the nerves flare up, but I am working full time, so that alone is exercise and constant changing of positions. Keep up the good work and don't feel down, you are progressing great!
Tamena

springchicken
06-20-2014, 08:44 AM
Five miles! That is amazing! I am 7 months post-op and am doing PT for the last four weeks, but there is no way I can do five miles (and I thought my healing is going great!) I am lucky to get a half a mile before the nerves flare up, but I am working full time, so that alone is exercise and constant changing of positions. Keep up the good work and don't feel down, you are progressing great!
Tamena


Thanks so much for the encouragement, Tamena! I should say that that's logged on a pedometer. So I can do a couple miles straight before I start hurting, but mainly I just try to get up and walk throughout the day (lots of little walks) and by the end of the day it's about 5 miles. I could not do 5 miles all at once! :)

I'm glad you are healing well! Working full-time has got to be so hard. I am lucky I work from home, but once or twice a week I have to go in to work and it's almost a two-hour commute each way on the train. Icepacks help a lot.

Good luck and keep me posted on your recovery!

leahdragonfly
06-20-2014, 10:11 AM
hi all,

i'm almost 6 mos post-op. physical therapy was very good for me (mainly for slowing me down a bit!) but then i sort of plateaued. my therapist suggested i take a break for a while so i can get used to going back into work. it's such a long commute that each time i go in i have to recover for a couple days after.

feeling pretty down lately that i seem to be recovering so slowly. i hope it's normal to plateau at this stage... i walk about 5 miles a day, but god forbid there are some hills in there (which is hard to avoid sometimes) because it flares up this nerve pain in my hip that shoots down my leg.

is it normal to still have to take tylenol every day?

thanks for listening,
spring

Hi Spring,

I think it is very common to have these plateaus along the way, which are very discouraging. Your horrendous commute is probably taking quite a toll on your energy and healing, so try to keep positive thoughts and things will continue to improve over time.

I took tylenol every day for about two years. I also still love to lay on my heating pad in the evenings before bed.

I improved at one year, at two years, and I had a large improvement after the two year mark, mentally as well as physically. I didn't quite realize how deathly afraid I was of suffering broken rods again. At my two year appt my surgeon told me I could do anything I wanted within reason, as long as it did not hurt, including bending, which I had been avoiding before that.

This recovery is like recovering from being hit by a truck. There is really no way to hurry it, other than taking good care of yourself and trying to be patient! You will get there too.

springchicken
06-21-2014, 09:56 PM
Hi Spring,

I think it is very common to have these plateaus along the way, which are very discouraging. Your horrendous commute is probably taking quite a toll on your energy and healing, so try to keep positive thoughts and things will continue to improve over time.

I took tylenol every day for about two years. I also still love to lay on my heating pad in the evenings before bed.

I improved at one year, at two years, and I had a large improvement after the two year mark, mentally as well as physically. I didn't quite realize how deathly afraid I was of suffering broken rods again. At my two year appt my surgeon told me I could do anything I wanted within reason, as long as it did not hurt, including bending, which I had been avoiding before that.

This recovery is like recovering from being hit by a truck. There is really no way to hurry it, other than taking good care of yourself and trying to be patient! You will get there too.


Thank you for your message, Gayle. I have been having a rough time lately. The physical side is one issue, but the mental side is my real challenge. Just got back from a wedding and much of my family had forgotten I had even had surgery. Since I look normal-no braces, no casts- there is bewilderment that I'm still struggling. It's hard to set limits for yourself as you well know! had to tell myself it was ok to leave a little early.

I'm relieved to hear you took Tylenol for a long while. Thank you for sharing your experiences and for your encouragement! I feel overwhelmed when I think I have months of recovery ahead, but also optimistic...things will get better gradually.

kennedy
06-21-2014, 10:40 PM
I only had PT while in the hospital. due to my insurance they wont provide PT after because I'm a lot younger then most of the adults here. probley due to my young age at the time of surgery at 18

Pooka1
06-21-2014, 10:48 PM
I only had PT while in the hospital. due to my insurance they wont provide PT after because I'm a lot younger then most of the adults here. Probably due to my young age at the time of surgery at 18

Yes Kara, I have noticed that the younger patients are not prescribed and don't need any PT after surgery. My girls bounced back very quickly on their own after being fused as teenagers.

leahdragonfly
06-21-2014, 10:56 PM
Hi Spring,

I know exactly what you mean about everyone forgetting you had surgery and thinking you should be perfectly normal by now. Showing an x-ray occasionally is helpful for clueless people who just don't get it, although I strongly feel it's nobody's business and you shouldn't have to do that, but I have pulled out my x-ray to show a couple of people who really didn't get it. They are always truly shocked. People just can't possibly understand this recovery, even if they are well-meaning close family and friends. I sensed that people didn't really want to hear about my long recovery, so mostly I got used to not mentioning it. And I really do think that the mental aspect of this recovery is something that is seldom talked about, even here.

Hang in there, be good to yourself, and take it easy. I think overdoing it is always a mistake, something you can strive to avoid. Pretty soon you'll be the one on here giving out advice several years later to new post-ops.

Best regards,

titaniumed
06-21-2014, 11:47 PM
This recovery is like recovering from being hit by a truck. There is really no way to hurry it, other than taking good care of yourself and trying to be patient! You will get there too.

Its funny how Paulís surgeon told him that he didnít want to do his surgery.....My surgeon did it differently in that he told me that it wouldnít feel like I was hit by a truck, when I get done with you it will feel like you were run over by a freight train and hit with every axle. Its not like you come back and say ďLets do it, lets do it now!Ē (On the decision making process)

Spring, on the wedding, you have to realize that people that are not in the scoliosis community just donít know. They expect you to be that spring chicken a month after because someone they know had a single level microdisectomy and recovered wonderfully....Not all spine surgery is the same! We have to listen to our bodies and take things one step at a time. Leave if you have to leave, lay down if you have to lay down. The eventual benefits of my recovery took a long time but I hung in there and followed through. I have a thread here about walking in the Redwoods back in November 2008. The photo I posted shows how taxed I was at that stage (10 months) it was after doing my first mile.

It was worth it.....adult scoliosis surgery also teaches patience. Itís a life changer for sure.

Ed

susancook
06-22-2014, 12:14 AM
Thanks so much for the encouragement, Tamena! I should say that that's logged on a pedometer. So I can do a couple miles straight before I start hurting, but mainly I just try to get up and walk throughout the day (lots of little walks) and by the end of the day it's about 5 miles. I could not do 5 miles all at once! :)

I'm glad you are healing well! Working full-time has got to be so hard. I am lucky I work from home, but once or twice a week I have to go in to work and it's almost a two-hour commute each way on the train. Icepacks help a lot.

Good luck and keep me posted on your recovery!

Congratulations on 5 miles! I am about 15 months postop and no way could I do close to 5 miles!

I decided that if my scar was on the front and visible to me everyday as I dressed, that I would have more of an appreciation of the enormity of he surgery. I rarely look at my back just because I never really think about doing it. When I was telling my pain management MD about my back pain, it suddenly occurred to me that the Scoliosis curve was straightened in maybe less than an hour (my day 2 surgery was 10 hours) that is, after all of the hardware was put in place, the actual cranking of the spine (there's probably a better medical term), took a very short amount of time relative to the years that it took to become angulated. The back muscles must have been in phenomenal spasm as the short side became long...ouch! And the long stretched out side became short. An amazingly quick transition! No wonder it hurts so much!

Susan

springchicken
06-22-2014, 08:30 AM
THank you everyone for your encouraging responses. I really need to hear from people who have gone through it to put things in perspective. It's so hard for people to understand-you're right about that. Even my husband grows frustrated and he is a very patient guy. But I know he gets tired of me trying to analyze if I'm on the right path, or what I could be doing better, etc etc.

Summer seems to be a greater challenge because everyone wants to get together. I just need to learn to say no sometimes! :)

Susie*Bee
06-22-2014, 12:30 PM
Its funny how Paulís surgeon told him that he didnít want to do his surgery.....My surgeon did it differently in that he told me that it wouldnít feel like I was hit by a truck, when I get done with you it will feel like you were run over by a freight train and hit with every axle. Its not like you come back and say ďLets do it, lets do it now!Ē (On the decision making process)

Spring, on the wedding, you have to realize that people that are not in the scoliosis community just donít know. They expect you to be that spring chicken a month after because someone they know had a single level microdisectomy and recovered wonderfully....Not all spine surgery is the same! We have to listen to our bodies and take things one step at a time. Leave if you have to leave, lay down if you have to lay down. The eventual benefits of my recovery took a long time but I hung in there and followed through. I have a thread here about walking in the Redwoods back in November 2008. The photo I posted shows how taxed I was at that stage (10 months) it was after doing my first mile.

It was worth it.....adult scoliosis surgery also teaches patience. Itís a life changer for sure.

Ed
Sometimes (often) I wish there were "like" buttons on our posts!

Susie*Bee
06-22-2014, 01:07 PM
springchicken--

Everyone is so different in their recovery journey. You sound like you are doing quite well. When you are discouraged, just look back and see how far you've come. I am seven years post-op, and I remember so well that after one year I was reconciled to the fact that "well, this is how it's going to be..." and I was ok with that. But then at two years, I was SO much better, and at three, even more so, and so it goes. You have to work at it PLUS learn patience, just as Ed said. I had PT at 6 months for arm and leg strength and at 11 months for core strengthening. Both bouts helped me immensely as I had gotten so weak after the surgery. That was my WORK -- because I kept it up in between and afterward.

I also remember, since you spoke of your relatives not understanding, that people at my church started asking me at around 8 months or so, "what went wrong?" --- and they just did not understand. I told them that nothing went "wrong" -- that it was just total reconstruction of my spine and would take a long time to recover from. At other times on the forum some of us mentioned it might be wise to have a photo of your x-rays, both side and anterior, to show to people who don't understand as sometimes that helps get the point across. And as Ed said also-- for many people back surgery of any kind is the same thing-- even something relatively simple with a short recovery time, so they just don't "get it." Best wishes with your continued recovery. You're doing great. And that is super if you are down to tylenol! At 5 months I was weaning off of hydrocodone, neurontin, and valium... and onto tramadol. So I think you are doing wonderfully well! Keep it up -- you're doing great!

springchicken
06-24-2014, 03:43 PM
springchicken--

Everyone is so different in their recovery journey. You sound like you are doing quite well. When you are discouraged, just look back and see how far you've come. I am seven years post-op, and I remember so well that after one year I was reconciled to the fact that "well, this is how it's going to be..." and I was ok with that. But then at two years, I was SO much better, and at three, even more so, and so it goes. You have to work at it PLUS learn patience, just as Ed said. I had PT at 6 months for arm and leg strength and at 11 months for core strengthening. Both bouts helped me immensely as I had gotten so weak after the surgery. That was my WORK -- because I kept it up in between and afterward.

I also remember, since you spoke of your relatives not understanding, that people at my church started asking me at around 8 months or so, "what went wrong?" --- and they just did not understand. I told them that nothing went "wrong" -- that it was just total reconstruction of my spine and would take a long time to recover from. At other times on the forum some of us mentioned it might be wise to have a photo of your x-rays, both side and anterior, to show to people who don't understand as sometimes that helps get the point across. And as Ed said also-- for many people back surgery of any kind is the same thing-- even something relatively simple with a short recovery time, so they just don't "get it." Best wishes with your continued recovery. You're doing great. And that is super if you are down to tylenol! At 5 months I was weaning off of hydrocodone, neurontin, and valium... and onto tramadol. So I think you are doing wonderfully well! Keep it up -- you're doing great!


Thank you Susiebee! I guess that's the key. Everyone is different and all recoveries are different. I really feel bad complaining sometimes when I think of some of the incredible challenges other members on the forum have dealt with/are dealing with. In the grand scheme of things, I know I'm lucky. I guess I just had been documenting my progress every week and for the past month or so I noticed I had plateaued and it discouraged me. Today I took a leftover oxycontin--it didn't do much, I just wanted to see if it would help.

Anyways, I will take your advice to heart. It is great to know that you improved year after year! Thank you, and thank you to all the other members, for continuing to share your stories and impart your wisdom. IT means a lot.

the_baroness
06-24-2014, 05:49 PM
Oh Spring, you poor dear. I need to read this whole thread a little more closely, so I think I will print it out and take it on the train with me tonight. But I just want to chime in with a "hang in there." It's so easy to get discouraged, and this is probably the hardest thing any of us will ever do in our lives. Everyone here on the forum told me it would get better, and I have to say that back at 6 months I didn't quite believe them I was so discouraged and exhausted and in pain. I read here on the forum one person who mentioned being exhausted to the point of tears during her recovery. It's the exhaustion I think that makes the rest of it so difficult to bear. We all can probably endure pain, having scoliosis means being no stranger to pain. But the sheer exhaustion you experience recovering from surgery is like nothing I've every experienced. A few times I actually fell asleep while walking home from the subway, if that's even possible. Spring, hang in there. I am sending you and everyone else who is struggling all my positive vibes! I feel since I am doing a little better now, I even have some positive vibes to spare - so I believe everyone now, that it's possible to get better! Not all the way better yet, but definitely better. Heating pad. Sleep. Comfy clothes. Let people help you. Um, maybe good nutrition. That's not much of an arsenal to defend against a full scale slog by your entire body, but it's all we have! Also, my physical therapist saved my life. She formerly worked at NYU hospital with many scoliosis fusion patients, so she knows the drill. My previous PT kept trying to get me to do pelvic tilts! That's hilarious! I think she fundamentally misunderstood the nature of fusion. But once I found Svetlana, I felt like I had someone in my corner. I never would have made it without her. Honestly I mean that. If anyone is in NYC (Brooklyn) and needs a PT referral, she is amazing and I highly recommend her.

Good healing vibes to you all!

springchicken
06-30-2014, 01:38 PM
hi baroness,

thank you so much for your kind message. i definitely appreciate the healing vibes! and i can certainly relate to the exhaustion. i've been napping more lately, but i figure if i'm tired, my body must need the extra sleep, so i'll just go with it for now.

everyone's encouragement has definitely helped put my head in a better place!

oh PS, in another thread you gave a quote about facing fear and said you were a sci-fi nerd. so i read it to my husband, another sci-fi nerd, to see what you were referencing and he said, "oh cool, she likes Dune." he was impressed. :)