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Delta107
04-17-2013, 12:59 PM
Hi I'm 24(male)


I also got another question regarding the bed. When I was small the doctors insisted on hard surface bed. Recently I bought a new bed with an orthopedic mattress. http://orthopedicmattressreviews.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/orthopedic-spring-mattress-for-hotel-rooms-43476.jpg What do scoliotic pacients usually sleep on? Can bed type increase the chance of curve progression? Or it is not known?
Thanks again!!!

susancook
04-17-2013, 08:19 PM
Hi Delta! Just wanted to welcome you to the site. The opinions of almost 100 percent of the folks on this site are just opinions. Your back looks like it does have a problem and I suggest that you go to see a spinal /scoliosis specialist and have some good X-rays done of the spine. Look on the scoliosis site for SRS specialists. This will give you a baseline and you can begin some physical therapy that is specific to your problem. Good luck. This might be a long journey for you, but at least get going with a doctor who knows what he/she is doing. Susan

LindaRacine
04-17-2013, 11:18 PM
Hi I'm 24
Can someone tell me very approximately(I know x-rays are better but I got none recent) what is the curve angle. Is the curve mild or moderate, or how is it classified? Thank you!
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/822/mg0388.jpg/
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/844/23544588.jpg/
I tried to draw the curve as accurate as I could but I provided 2 images in case the one drawn by me is wrong.
I also got another question regarding the bed. When I was small the doctors insisted on hard surface bed. Recently I bought a new bed with an orthopedic mattress. http:// http://www.google.md/search?client=tablet-android-asus-nexus&rlz=1Y3NDUG_enMD510MD511&q=orthopedic+mattress&bav=on.2,or.r_cp.&bvm=bv.45368065,d.Yms&biw=600&bih=904&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=WN9uUannGoq3hQeEzoGgBw#biv=i%7C0%3Bd%7C4SkmJwOn N2rywM%3A What do scoliotic pacients usually sleep on? Can bed type increase the chance of curve progression? Or it is not known?
Thanks again!!!

Hi Delta...

It is very doubtful that scoliosis curves can be influenced by a mattress.

If you do a search on the word mattress, you'll find several threads here. You'll see that there is no consensus. I think most of us like cushy mattresses, while some prefer very hard mattresses.

I would say that you have at least one curve of maybe 40-60 degrees, but one can't really tell from looking from the outside. Do you have plans to see a specialist?

--Linda

Delta107
04-18-2013, 12:21 AM
Yeah I intend to have some x rays done just have to conquer some psychological obstacles.

I have another question. I did read that various exercises can reduce pain and muscle stiffness(because of muscle overworking) yet these will not cure the condition. Can bad posture increase the risk for progression? Actually what is bad posture? My mother has been often nagging me about my slightly tilted head, yet keeping it straight all the time is impossible because I can't be tense all the time. More than that but I did some photos and didn't seem to see much difference(except the head part) between the seemingly "right posture"(closing the shoulders) and usual posture.

Pooka1
04-18-2013, 07:09 AM
Hi. As others said it is not easy to guess a curve from the outside.

That said, I think you are north of 60* which would be considered large. As Dr. Hey says, a stitch in time saves nine. I think he means that, in general, fusion will be faster and easier and you will get a better result if you do it sooner rather than later. But there are certainly surgeons advocating waiting or not fusing for adults.

The other thing is you appear to have only a thoracic curve. If you wait, it may later involve the lumbar. While having a fused thoracic curve is almost normal in terms of range of motion because people don't routinely bend through the rib cage, having a fused lumbar is an entirely different story. Just something to consider.

Good luck.

jrnyc
04-18-2013, 07:25 AM
welcome...
what scoliosis specialists are available for you in Romania...??
i hope you are able to find the medical help you need.

jess

Delta107
04-18-2013, 09:01 AM
Is there any evidence that prolonged sitting in front of the computer can significantly increase scoliosis progression?

rohrer01
04-18-2013, 12:21 PM
Delta, welcome!

I don't think there is any conclusive evidence that anything, such as posture, mattress firmness, slouching, carrying heavy packs, cause scoliosis or have any impact on it. I could be wrong, but I've read a lot of stuff. There is a nice section on scoliosis if you go back to the home page for this site.

I agree with Pooka1 that your curve looks larger than 60*. You have to remember that curves involve rotation of the spine and can look deceptively small from the outside. You can't see the major portion of the vertebrae from looking at a person. All you see is the spinous process which is a very small part of the vertebra. These can even be bent over and usually are to some extent, making the curve look smaller on the outside. My curve is between 40* and 50* and looks nothing like yours. I'm not trying to scare you. You do need to see a specialist, especially if you are having pain or feel restricted in your breathing.

As far as mattresses go, sleep on whatever is most comfortable for you. You want to be as comfortable as possible, especially if you are having pain with your scoliosis.

As for posture. Can a scoliotic person have "good" posture? I don't believe that is entirely possible. If your neck is jutting forward, that is your body's way of compensating for the lack of kyphosis. Looking from the side, a normal spine has a gentle S shape. Many people with thoracic curves lack this gentle outward curve of the spine between the shoulder blades. You look hypokyphotic, meaning you don't have the normal outward curve between your shoulder blades. The only way to compensate for balance is to jut your head forward a bit. I have the same problem. If you explain this to your mom, then maybe she will quit getting after you about your posture.

Please keep us updated and take care.

Delta107
05-29-2013, 02:40 AM
I want to ask a question regarding weight carrying. For some reasons which I hope the doctors would figure I can't carry more than 1-1.5 kg of weight without pain(hard to quantify it, I think its some kind of cutting-sore pain in the region of the vertebrae) which resolves itself after a few days. Is this normal for scoliosis patients not to be able to carry weight because of pain? I am scheduled to see first an orthopedist next month.

rohrer01
05-29-2013, 03:58 AM
Delta, I have always had a weight restriction on me since my diagnosis. I've been restricted from anywhere from 10 - 30lb (4 - 13kg). If you can't lift 1 - 1.5kg without pain I would definitely tell this information to your doctor. That's like lifting a book. That should not cause you pain. When are you seeing your doctor? I'm not trying to scare you, but I would get in as soon as you can.

You mention that you had some psychological obstacles to conquer. I'm not in any way going to pry there. I just want you to know that you are not alone in that area either. I've noticed over the years that, on average, men have a harder time dealing with this than women. I'm a woman and am not saying that we don't have our battles, because we do. Just know that there is support here among other men if you wish to reach out to any of them. Titaniumed has been a great source of encouragement to both men and women and I'm pretty sure he would keep your confidence. You can contact people via PM.

It's probably daytime there, so I hope you have a good day. =)

Delta107
05-29-2013, 05:03 AM
Thanks for the reply! Its not like I can't move thing around at home, its a problem when shopping and going to work with too "heavy" a hand bag. Anyway, I'm seeing a psychologist, and I'm doing less "panicking" when in public places thinking everyone sees my deformity. But it took a lot of convincing from my therapist and trying to convince myself...

rohrer01
05-29-2013, 05:54 AM
Well, then, I really commend you for being brave enough to show us pictures and ask for opinions. Of course, all of us here either have the deformity ourselves or have loved ones who do. So there is nothing "shocking" to us. I know I feel a little self-conscious at times, okay a LOT self-conscious at times, but it's my body, part of who I am, whether or not I ever get it fixed. I think I've actually gotten a little more self-conscious over the last several years. I don't know why, but it's hard sometimes. I'm older so I'm having other pain issues related to other parts of my body wearing out or getting injured because of the scoliosis. I never imagined life to be this way. But I'm glad that I have people here on this forum to talk to who understand. People not dealing with this try to be sympathetic, but they just can't understand that it's not always the physical pain but the emotional pain that this disorder brings on a person. I'm glad you are getting help. Straight back or not, you are a valuable human being worth just as much as any other human being. I'm signing off for now, since it's wee hours of the morning where I'm at. Keep up the progress and remember that it's who we are, not what we look like that matters most. =)

jrnyc
05-29-2013, 01:58 PM
Delta....how experienced are the scoliosis specialists available
to you in your country?
i am ignorant of what is there for you medically...

i think the best thing to do would be to ask your questions of a
medical doctor...
i can tell you that with an upper curve of 42 and lower of 70, there
are positions that make me hurt worse...if i sit at the computer for long.,
i get up feeling stiff and achey...but i do not know that any position
actually can change a curve to make it worse...
i have other things wrong...degenerative disc disase, arthritis,
listhesis, etc...things that add to the pain, but things most
young scoliosis patients do not have...
perhaps a scoliosis medical doctor would know the answer to that...

most people are keenly aware of their own body "imperfections" and
others do not ever look at us as closely as we look at ourselves...
many people are their own worst critics, especially women...but men
are not immune from being self critical, as you well know.

i hope you find the answers you seek...
jess

Delta107
05-30-2013, 02:38 AM
Thnx for answering,

Oddly enough my back pain can subside after a very few push ups, though more pushups can actually make it worse. Its very odd. As for the doctors... I don't know.(They are badly funded) I think the general orthopedist I am about to see will send me to some other doctor.

Delta107
06-14-2013, 07:10 AM
Finally I got my spine x-ray. The radiologist said its called s thoracic scoliosis and has written 39 degrees. But that must be some other measurement method(?) because I measured according to the Cobb method and if I measured correctly its ~75 degrees(there is a very tilted vertebrae and I measured from that one). I'll post the image later.

I did a small search on youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbQaT7z54E4 This gives me shivers, its like repairing a car.

rohrer01
06-14-2013, 11:48 AM
Hi, Delta!
Yes, those videos are amazing. It takes a lot of brut strength to be a scoliosis surgeon, just like it does to be a mechanic. For me personally, that is the primary reason I see a male doctor. I wouldn't feel comfortable with a female doctor for this procedure. But there are plenty of female doctors out there that seem to do a very good job. It's just that men, in general, have more upper body strength than do women. But there are also some really good female mechanics. I haven't found one. For instance, we take our car in to get it aligned. One time, the mechanic was a female. We were told that there was something wrong with our vehicle which prevented it from being aligned properly. We went on vacation in the winter and our vehicle was extremely hard to control on the ice. When we got back from our vacation I took the vehicle in to have the alignment checked again. This time it was a male mechanic and he was able to easily align the vehicle properly. This made me a little angry because our vacation was very stressful and dangerous. After this experience, I will NOT let a female mechanic work on my vehicle for things that take such physical strength. It also made me think of scoliosis surgery, since I have seen many of these videos before. I know someone with poor correction from surgery. This individual was young and healthy which makes the surgery "easier" to perform. She should have gotten a near 100% correction, but didn't get anywhere that good. I asked about this surgeon at one of my doctor's appointments to find out if she was still performing scoliosis surgeries. I was told that she was not because she injured her shoulder. So this is my own bias, prejudice, or whatever you want to call it, against women scoliosis surgeons. I'm not at all prejudiced against women doctors, but there are just some areas of medicine that I feel they are not best suited for, even if the woman is particularly large, which the one that I mentioned is.

I'll probably get reamed for posting this, LOL. But this is something that I personally consider when choosing a doctor to deal with my scoliosis. That's what makes ME comfortable.

I can't wait to see your x-rays! Did they put it on a disc for you? That's the best way to look at them. They come with a program formatted with the tools you need to measure your curves. Many of us will look at it, but since most of us don't have the program on our computers (it's on the disc itself) we won't be able to measure it for you. However, you can look on the forum for x-rays of people with different curve magnitudes. My curve magnitude is about 46* (measured by 2 SRS doctors who both got the same measurement). My recent measurement of 42* comes from lack of consistency. I trust the higher one because of the fact that two specialists agreed on that measurement. So if you look at my x-rays vs. someone with a much larger curve, you can kind of figure out where you are most likely at. I have one x-ray posted that was measured at 41* before some progression. So if yours looks similar in magnitude then you'll know. You have to consider rotation, too. It can make a smaller lateral curve look much larger from the outside. But the x-rays will show what's going on in the inside.

Well, I've rambled long enough. I look forward to seeing your x-rays!

Delta107
06-14-2013, 01:17 PM
1493 Front plane
1494 Right plane Are my cobb calculations correct?(i.e. ~75 Cobb degrees)
I've entered a frenzy state(gone berserker so to speak) being extremely upset and damaged my fist(again). And yet that damn nagging back pain somehow breaks through even with my hand hurting... I hope that doctor can prescribe me some good physical therapy.

Delta107
06-14-2013, 01:26 PM
Thx for posting I just photographed(the radiologist used indeed a PC to compute the 39 degree angle, she used a rather complicated method) and calculated the angle in CorelDraw. I'm just interested if the angle is indeed in the 70+ range. The radiologist has also mentioned rotation and flattening of the kyphosis(whatever that means, the orthopedist should figure it out).

rohrer01
06-14-2013, 03:01 PM
Delta,
Flattening of the kyphosis means that the natural curvature outward between your shoulder blades is flat. Looking sideways at the spine it forms a gentle S shape. The part that should curve outward is flattened. It is referred to as hypokyphosis. You will see this term a lot on here. Hyperkyphosis means just the opposite, that there is too much outward curve. People with this condition look like hunched back. Yours is probably sunken inward between your shoulder blades. That's how mine is. Mine is, in fact, quite severe.

Again, I look forward to seeing your x-rays. It's too bad they didn't give you a copy of the disc. If she had to use Corel, then the disc won't have the dicom format that is so useful. See if they will make you a copy of the disc anyway. It's easier to keep than a big film.

Pooka1
06-14-2013, 03:15 PM
1493 Front plane
1494 Right plane Are my cobb calculations correct?(i.e. ~75 Cobb degrees)
I've entered a frenzy state(gone berserker so to speak) being extremely upset and damaged my fist(again). And yet that damn nagging back pain somehow breaks through even with my hand hurting... I hope that doctor can prescribe me some good physical therapy.

That looks to be at least 75*. Might be more.

titaniumed
06-15-2013, 01:46 AM
I agree....

Delta

Do you have a surgeon that you are talking to?

Welcome to the forum

Ed

Delta107
06-15-2013, 02:09 AM
First I am appointed to an orthopedist to make me a diagnose. Then I'll have to find one... I want to delay this for as much as possible, but that remains to be seen...

Delta107
06-15-2013, 09:30 AM
Usually I don't like to complain, but I'd like to know if others have experienced smth like this. Last year I dropped swimming because I was getting pain while swimming. Yesterday my mother somehow managed to convince me to try swimming again. So today I went to swim a bit. It was nothing special really. Knowing that I am prone to back pain I did usual leg drills. I also did ~50 m breaststroke and 25 m crawl but stopped when I started to feel weird in my neck. After 45min the bell rang the end time. So I decided that since my muscles were warm and ready I did 50 m crawl as an end drill. By the time I finished I began to feel extreme pain in the chest, and couldn't draw breath, and the back muscles were twitching when breathing. It felt like someone has cut me inside my chest with something sharp. Once I was out I found out that I couldn't draw a deep breath, only very shallow ones and was getting dizzy(couldn't get enough air). Soon my mother came and we went to a trauma center and got injected with pain relief(the doctor actually said he sees no trauma...). I still hurt a bit but I can breath. It was very scary... Now I can hardly believe I felt that absent that pain.

Two years ago I was easily doing 200m crawl drills... Now I can't do even 50... I think its because my scoliosis got worse, but I don't know. My only older radiography is when I was ~15 when I was still growing. So I got 0 reference. My parents feared the radiation :(

rohrer01
06-15-2013, 03:57 PM
Delta,
Fortunately Pooka1 quoted your post, otherwise I would not have been able to see your x-rays. Please don't delete these because we can't give you our opinions otherwise. Your curve looks very large. I will show you what a 46*/38* double major curve looks like:

1497

So now you know that your is much more. I wouldn't delay in getting in to see a specialist. Make sure that you see someone who specializes in scoliosis.

As far as physical therapy goes, I will give you my personal experience. It helped me when my curve was around 40* or less. As the curve got bigger it stopped helping with the pain. I'm not telling you not to try physical therapy, but I have a hunch that they will recommend surgery. If surgery is something that you don't want, there are also people on this forum that you can reach out to that may be able to guide you with some exercises or specific places to go or look for help. As far as I know, physical therapy doesn't correct curves that big, but I'm not a specialist. If you are in as much pain as you are AND with the size of your curve, I just know what my doctor would say. I'm not recommending any specific treatment. I'm just trying to prepare you for what you may hear. It worries me about what happened when you tried swimming. I wish you the best and hope that at the minimum you should get your pain under control.

rohrer01
06-15-2013, 04:01 PM
Just a very important side point. IF you still have your original radiographs or even your latest ones from when you were 15, it would be very helpful for the orthopedic doctor to look at for comparison. It tells them how your spine is moving.

Take care.

mashkine
06-15-2013, 04:04 PM
Hi,
I don't know how much you swam before you stopped a year ago, but if you went into a heavy workout after a big break, that alone could give you pain cramps and shortness of breath, so it's hard to say how much of the problem is because of your spine. I used to swim a lot with double 55s, and felt fine. Last year I was doing backstroke when I got a terrible cramp in my neck - I pretty much just floated to the wall and felt like I was going to pass out, but it gradually got better, even though it took a couple of days for it to go away completely. Totally healthy people get these cramps too. That said, your curve does look pretty severe. Whether or not it affects your lungs is up to a good doctor to find out.

Delta107
06-15-2013, 05:07 PM
I've been swimming since 7 years old and never ever experienced smth like that. It could be related to a big break, but I did very very light drills. Its not the first time I swim after a break. Thanks for all comment!

JenniferG
06-15-2013, 06:51 PM
My surgeon calls himself a carpenter. Though a mechanic might be a more apt choice!

That's a good video, I haven't seen that one before. I think it shows how the pedicle screws work, better than other videos I've seen. It's just so amazing what they do, these amazing surgeons. Imagine the courage it would take, the first hundred or so surgeries!

rohrer01
06-16-2013, 12:06 AM
Sorry, Delta, for saying you deleted your x-rays. I found the post. I don't know why I didn't see them before. I looked several times. I guess I didn't look high enough on the thread. Anyway, please accept my apologies.

Also, the radiograph that I posted is mine. That's why I know the measurements. The larger curve is actually the top curve even though they look similar. I hope you have a better day today. Just remember you are not alone in dealing with this. I have a lot of pain with my scoliosis, too. Some people, even with very large curves, have no pain. Other people with very large and also not-so-large curves have a lot of pain. The medical community cannot explain this. Your curve "looks" painful. I hope you don't delay in getting seen. Please continue to keep us updated. I'm sure you will find the support of many people and helpful information to educate you about your disease. I know that I have.

Delta107
06-16-2013, 03:50 AM
Thanks for your support it lifts the spirit!

Delta107
06-28-2013, 07:44 AM
I had an appointment with an orthopedist. According to his opinion my curve shouldn't evolve significantly in the near future. Yet he said over decades it could evolve because of degeneration. I've been prescribed physical therapy and some kind of massage, electromyostimulation, and I think pulsed electromagnetic fields therapy whatever that means. And of course a list of NSAIDs and muscle relaxants.

The doctor didn't even mention surgery. I think I need a second opinion. But within another year or two I'll have another x-ray so that I'll know then whether the curve progresses significantly or not. The way I understood until now is that surgery is not a treatment for pain. Its designed to stop the progression by all means.

Anyway does anyone(especially non-surgical patients) have any pain relief from the above mentioned treatments(if these can be called as such)?

Thanks for reading.

rohrer01
06-28-2013, 01:51 PM
I had an appointment with an orthopedist. According to his opinion my curve shouldn't evolve significantly in the near future. Yet he said over decades it could evolve because of degeneration. I've been prescribed physical therapy and some kind of massage, electromyostimulation, and I think pulsed electromagnetic fields therapy whatever that means. And of course a list of NSAIDs and muscle relaxants.

The doctor didn't even mention surgery. I think I need a second opinion. But within another year or two I'll have another x-ray so that I'll know then whether the curve progresses significantly or not. The way I understood until now is that surgery is not a treatment for pain. Its designed to stop the progression by all means.

Anyway does anyone(especially non-surgical patients) have any pain relief from the above mentioned treatments(if these can be called as such)?

Thanks for reading.

Delta, I'm replying with a quote so that I have at hand all of the things that you have been prescribed.
I would get a second opinion. We have a top surgeon here that takes ONLY cases that are >70* or otherwise significant in some way. If your pain is tolerable, that's great. But from what you describe, it isn't. My surgeon said that pain WAS an indicator for having surgery, even on smaller curves. Most surgeons here in the USA will say the same thing. It's my understanding that progression is most likely on curves >50*, not because of degeneration but because of the force of gravity. Your muscles can only do so much. Being physically fit is ALWAYS a good idea for anyone, but especially for us. Unfortunately, this alone does not stop progression. You can look this up on the internet and find all kinds of information about the >50* progression risk. I think it's like 1* to 2* per year on average. The larger the curve, the greater the likelihood of more rapid progression. I'm not trying to scare you. It's just the information that's out there. Many people with large curves opt not to have surgery. That's a very personal decision. Did your doctor measure your curve? Did he compare old x-rays with the new ones?

As far as the treatments prescribed to you, I have had EVERY single one except pulsed electromagnetic field therapy. On that note, electromagnetic therapy was a fad that swept through the USA about 15 years ago. People were wearing magnetic bracelets, magnetic shoe inserts, and even buying magnetic blankets. I had a friend that bought into the whole scam. She swore by it until she realized that she'd spent $100's and after a few months was still requiring the same amount of pain meds and really didn't feel any better. It had an initial placebo effect.

The NSAID's do help with pain and inflammation. Some of them work as well as or better than low dose narcotics, especially Naproxen Sodium (Aleve) and Ibuprofen (Advil) in my case. The problem with these drugs, as many know, is that they are very hard on the stomach and kidneys. According to my lab tests I'm in stage two renal failure from long term NSAID use even though I don't use them every day. I'm 44 years old. They also affect the heart. I have a tachyarrhythmia (my heart beats too fast) and had a bad reaction only once. With that said, I have found these drugs to be most helpful with pain to a point. The Cox 2 inhibitors designed to protect the stomach haven't worked as well for me personally. Other people have had successful relief with them.

Muscle relaxants, at least in my case, are a must. I suffer horribly from muscle rigidity, spasticity, etc. The fact that we are imbalanced puts a large amount of strain on our muscles just to keep us upright. The drawbacks of these medications are, of course, drowsiness. There is one that I know of that I take that is not supposed to lose its efficacy over time even though the body gets used to the drug and after some time there is no drowsiness. That drug is baclofen. Other muscle relaxants that I've personally tried make me drowsy or when the drowsiness wears off over time so does the way the drug works. I had one affect my heart. Your doctor will have to work with you to find out what's best for you. I'm on baclofen and Klonopin, which is a long acting benzodiazepine. I am prohibited from having any alcohol because of the danger of mixing a benzo with it. It can cause a dangerous drop in blood pressure. So if you drink alcohol, make sure that your doctor is aware of this.

What kind of massage therapy have you been prescribed? I have had both types of massage. A general massage feels great and can help relax me. The deep muscle massage I have renamed "muscle massacre"! It really helps some people, but only aggravated my nerve endings and made my pain worse. I've had myofascial release, which was basically the physical therapist gently pulling my skin in different directions. It was calming and usually felt good, but didn't give any lasting relief at all. She just had me lay on my back while she put her hands under me. It was something I felt anyone could have done.

The electrostimulation that I had was designed to strengthen the muscles on the convex side of the curve (outside). My physician at the time said he was going to cure me that way and write a paper on the cure he invented! This procedure has been tried and tested over the years by many physicians and proves to be ineffective. It's time consuming therapy. It provided NO relief. It did not improve my curve at all.

Physical therapy, depending on the exercises given, went both ways for me. As a youngster, they gave me a standard set of exercises to do that they gave ALL the scoliosis patients. These exercises actually required me to do things that exaggerated my loss of thoracic kyphosis and loss of lumbar lordosis. In other words, they completely flattened my back in the sagittal plane (side view) which is not good. These exercises INCREASED my pain. Later on, I found a very good physical therapist that prescribed exercises specific to my needs. These exercises reduced my pain so dramatically that I no longer needed prescription pain medication. The drawback to this was that once my curve increased over 40*, the exercises no longer worked at reducing pain. Hopefully, you will find some exercises that help. You have to be very open with your physical therapist and tell him/her whether it's working for pain, doing nothing, or making things worse. I've gotten to the point in my life that I'm very proactive with my physical therapists and will blatantly tell them if it's helping or not. I refuse to do anything that aggravates my pain unless I can see a longer term benefit for working through the pain.

The things that have helped me the most are unfortunately medications. Aside from oral medications, Botox injections into the rigid muscles and trigger point injections have helped the most. But I have been diagnosed with Cervical Dystonia which is not specific to people with scoliosis. I don't have the uncontrolled head movements like some people have. I have some twitching but mostly rock hard muscles. So I don't know if this would help you or not. If you have muscle spasms, I would suggest trying the trigger point injections. It breaks them up and reduces the pain that way.

Sorry for the book. I hope you find my experiences somewhat helpful.

Delta107
11-11-2013, 01:56 AM
Hi, just wanted to write a bit, I haven't posted here in a while. I intend to have another appointment with the orthopedist. Generally the physiotherapy exercises they prescribed work in a way. This is by no way treatment. But it is managing my pain very well. I didn't get a muscle relaxant injection in more than a month. I can't say I am better actually but I think I can live a few years with this. I think within two years or less we'll find out how fast this thing is progressing, and after that I'll see what I do next. The mental part is very difficult for its so uncertain what will happen to me. Possibly a good way to start would be to continue my training in graphics design and make a bit of cash.

For some reason(because of scoliosis) when I use my both hands on the computer mouse + keyboard my spine gets very very strained. This office culture isn't the future for sure. Anyone with a bit of knowledge of anatomy can see that our spine wasn't built for a modern office activity. I was arguing with a friend of mine that the computer input methods must change because its not comfortable to stay a few hours in front of the monitor even for healthy persons. Yet he said that hey the mouse is so nice and good its precise and so on.

Besides my experience so far shows me that I don't get pain simply by using the computer for a long time.(i.e. browsing and typing something once in while) The pain shows up when I dabble with both the mouse and keyboard simultaneously. Its weird I know that but that's it.

rohrer01
11-12-2013, 11:24 PM
Without looking back through our posts, have you had your x-rays up all along? I don't remember. I just now looked at them and that seems to be a pretty big curve! Your sagittal plane looks great to my layman's eye considering how large that thoracic curve is. So that's at least good news. I would get a second opinion if you can.

I'm sorry to hear that you aren't feeling better after all this time. As it turns out, much of my pain and my scoliosis, for that matter, may be coming from bigger problems. I was recently diagnosed with "muscle disease" probably Muscular Dystrophy and possibly Ehlers Danlos Syndrome. So the muscle disease can explain the muscle pain. It doesn't explain the bone pain I get in my spine, though. But a connective tissue disorder would seem a logical explanation for MY scoliosis. Right now I'm pretty much hating this. I have a lot more testing to go through to determine exactly which muscle disease I have.

Have they tested you for anything like that? I'm not suggesting by any means that everyone with scoliosis and/or pain has muscle disease. It's just a thought. I hope you find something to make you feel better. You are completely right about sitting in front of a computer. Have you considered using a laptop and laying in a recliner using pillows as necessary to support the parts of your body that need more support? I have an adjustable bed that I put in a recliner type position while I use my laptop. It helps tremendously with the strain. I don't even use my desktop anymore, except for about once a month. It's not even hooked up to the internet anymore. LOL

Thanks for updating us. I hope you get things figured out soon.

Delta107
11-20-2013, 09:06 AM
Without looking back through our posts, have you had your x-rays up all along? I don't remember. I just now looked at them and that seems to be a pretty big curve! Your sagittal plane looks great to my layman's eye considering how large that thoracic curve is. So that's at least good news. I would get a second opinion if you can.

I'm sorry to hear that you aren't feeling better after all this time. As it turns out, much of my pain and my scoliosis, for that matter, may be coming from bigger problems. I was recently diagnosed with "muscle disease" probably Muscular Dystrophy and possibly Ehlers Danlos Syndrome. So the muscle disease can explain the muscle pain. It doesn't explain the bone pain I get in my spine, though. But a connective tissue disorder would seem a logical explanation for MY scoliosis. Right now I'm pretty much hating this. I have a lot more testing to go through to determine exactly which muscle disease I have.

Have they tested you for anything like that? I'm not suggesting by any means that everyone with scoliosis and/or pain has muscle disease. It's just a thought. I hope you find something to make you feel better. You are completely right about sitting in front of a computer. Have you considered using a laptop and laying in a recliner using pillows as necessary to support the parts of your body that need more support? I have an adjustable bed that I put in a recliner type position while I use my laptop. It helps tremendously with the strain. I don't even use my desktop anymore, except for about once a month. It's not even hooked up to the internet anymore. LOL

Thanks for updating us. I hope you get things figured out soon.I have both desktop and laptop computers. My table has some kind of shelves where you put flowers, etc, so I have put the laptop there and I am using it in a standing position. Of course after some hours I could get some neck tiredness but the position is overall quite comfortable. It could be argued that its a bit easier to feel tired after some time, but that is the signal when rest is needed. And while sitting on a chair I don't really feel when its time to rest which causes pain. I think for such people with spine diseases are necessary special tables with adjustable heights. I was actually thinking to make a design project out of this(I am a design student). But its necessary to take into account that some ill people might not be able to stand. Still I think that adjustable height might be good.