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turfxo
12-26-2012, 08:42 PM
Hi guys, my name's Marissa (: I was diagnosed with idiopathic scoliosis in late 2004 early 2005 and was braced from 6th grade to freshman year of high school. I get back pain occasionally, usually around the time of my period, and sometimes just out of nowhere. If I stand up, walk, or sit down for a long period of time, when I change positions I get this sharp pain in my lower back. Like when I walk to class (about a 10-15 minute walk) as soon as I sit down I get a sharp pain and I kinda freeze up for a second so I try to stretch a little in my seat then it goes away after like 10 seconds. Also sometimes my neck is really sore when I wake up. I have a memory foam mattress topper which seemed to help, and sleep with a teddy or body pillow between my legs for support, but sometimes my shoulders and neck are just really sore. I sleep a lot, usually 10-14 hours, and sometimes waking up is really unpleasant. Anyways, I've really been contemplating surgery lately. My surgeon said about 6 months ago that surgery is not mandatory but if I wanted it I could get it done. Besides the pain, another reason why I want to get it is because I'm really embarrassed of how it looks. My right hip is very prominent and my lower spine is very noticeable. I also have fatty skin folds on both sides of my waist, and I'm not even fat, I'm 5 feet tall and usually range between 88-96 pounds. My back makes me really self conscious. I cry almost every night because I hate the way I look and I just wish I was normal. I know it could be a lot worse but I've struggled with body image issues for some time now and this just contributes to it. My question for you guys is do you regret or encourage surgery? Was it a good or bad experience? I have a phone appointment in a week to discuss things with my surgeon but I'd like to hear your surgery stories first. I attached my x-rays too so you guys can see. Thank you & look forward to hearing from you! :)

1414

kennedy
12-27-2012, 01:35 AM
Marissa welcome. I was your age when I had surgery. My curve was way worse it was 50 degrees. Now it 20 degrees

rohrer01
12-27-2012, 02:51 AM
First of all, Welcome to the forum!

I see the 43* and 28* curves, but don't know where they are getting a measurement of 90*. If you are serious about college, I would personally wait. I had similar curve sizes in college (graduated 10 years ago - almost). Depending on what you are majoring in, college can be very rigorous. Surgery would probably stop you for at least a semester, if not longer. From personal experience, once you've dropped out, it's VERY HARD to go back. I dropped out as a young adult and didn't go back until about 10 years later. My course of study was very demanding and I had a lot of pain due to a very high curve causing severe neck pain. I went to my dr. and was able to get a temporary disability parking permit for the first couple of years so that I didn't have to walk so far and fast between buildings. If your pain is that severe, you might be able to do the same.

As far as body image, I have the same weird hip (on one side) the sticks out and makes me look chubby through the waist on one side. I also am very thin, so this is a result of the scoliosis. I've learned to dress in such a way that my scoliosis can't even be seen by someone who doesn't know I have it. Button-up shirts that are taylored at the waist and left untucked are truly amazing! If your pain isn't that bad, I don't know that body image alone would be a good reason to put yourself through a surgery like that. On the other hand, I don't live in your body.

Another factor to consider is insurance coverage. If you expect that you will be covered by insurance after college, then that might be the right time to do it. If your curve is stable, you may not need it at all. If you think you will be going to work immediately after college and you are sure you will have the surgery, then you might consider getting it done now. I just personally can't imagine continuing with studies while trying to recover. Being young is a good factor on your side. Your healing time is faster when you are young.

I'm rambling 'cuz I don't really know what you are looking for. These are just some things that I would think about in making a decision like that during your college years.

Take Care.

Pooka1
12-27-2012, 08:13 AM
I see the 43* and 28* curves, but don't know where they are getting a measurement of 90*.

The 90* line is one of the orthogonals that they use to actually measure the 43. I don't see the other. It's the principle of corresponding angles. If they didn't use 90* orthogonals then the lines determining the 43* would intersect way off the right side of the page. Everyone uses orthogonals whether they show it on the radiograph or not. Small curves would intersect a few feet to the right if they didn't. Some very large curves might be doable without orthogonals without leaving the page.

Marina63
12-27-2012, 09:35 AM
Hi Marissa!

As one who has been through surgery and would be considered a successful case, I would suggest you wait as long as possible to have surgery. Your mobility will be significantly decreased. I am almost 50 and although I miss my mobility, I can deal with not having as much as I used to. I was very active in my 20s and 30s and cannot imagine being like I am now back then.

Have you considered the Schroth Method? You might want to google it. I hear good things of young people taking that route instead of surgery.

At the end of the day, only you know what is right for YOU.

Good luck!

rohrer01
12-27-2012, 10:10 AM
The 90* line is one of the orthogonals that they use to actually measure the 43. I don't see the other. It's the principle of corresponding angles. If they didn't use 90* orthogonals then the lines determining the 43* would intersect way off the right side of the page. Everyone uses orthogonals whether they show it on the radiograph or not. Small curves would intersect a few feet to the right if they didn't. Some very large curves might be doable with orthogonals without leaving the page.

Thank you, Sharon. I was running into that problem when looking at my own curves, although they weren't that far off the page. It makes perfect geometric sense. Sometimes late at night my brain stops working! LOL

Pooka1
12-27-2012, 10:18 AM
Thank you, Sharon. I was running into that problem when looking at my own curves, although they weren't that far off the page. It makes perfect geometric sense. Sometimes late at night my brain stops working! LOL

I am very confident you knew about corresponding angles but just forgot. :-)

Confusedmom
12-27-2012, 05:37 PM
Hi Marissa,

Do you know if you are progressing? If not, your curves might not be big enough to justify surgery. Most surgeons I spoke with dont even consider surgery until your curve is above 50 degrees--some 60 or 70.

A few things to think about:
-You will lose mobility with surgery. Fusion means your vertebrae are permanently stuck together, and you can't bend that part of your back that is fused ever again.
-You could end up in worse pain after surgery. Some people do, though most don't.
-You probably will look better, but not perfect after surgery. You may be taller.
-You are young, so you probably have strong bones and likely would heal quickly--possibly in a matter of weeks, like a teenager.
-You might be able to have a shorter fusion if you have it now, then if you wait 10-20 years. However, you could also end up having additional surgery later on.
-If you think you want to have children eventually, a fused spine could make some aspects of caring for a child more difficult. On the other hand, surgery could eliminate some pain you might have with pregnancy.
-It is important to seek out a highly qualified scoliosis surgeon who regularly operates on adults.

If it were me, I probably would try to get through college without surgery. Then if your curve has reached 50+ degrees, you can consider it. Physical therapy can help a lot to reduce pain. So can exercise. Also, there are some forms of yoga that can help you strengthen an muscles and give you a better overall appearance. There is a book on this website called Dress Your Curves, which can help with camouflage. Also, I hope you don't mind me saying so, but you sound a bit depressed. The amount of sleep, plus crying a lot. You might want to see a primary care doctor about that. Depression can contribute to back pain. Treatment of depression can help with tolerance of body image. If you are depressed, it is not something to be embarrassed about, and it can be treated. Many of us with scoliosis have experienced depression at one point or another.

Good luck--it's a difficult decision.

Best,
Evelyn

Confusedmom
12-27-2012, 05:39 PM
Also, I just realized you are only 18. You might want to read up on the adolescent forum, as well. Adult surgery is much more difficult, generally, and yours may be more like a teenager's.

Best,
Evelyn

Irina
12-27-2012, 06:23 PM
Also, I just realized you are only 18. You might want to read up on the adolescent forum, as well. Adult surgery is much more difficult, generally, and yours may be more like a teenager's.

Best,
Evelyn

This is what I was thinking. Marissa is only 18 and this section of the forum has a lot of older people whose recoveries could be much more difficult. Marissa, it is a hard decision to make, but keep things in a prospective - you might have much better prospects and easier recovery because you are much younger than majority of us on "Adult" section of this forum.

kennedy
12-27-2012, 07:04 PM
The adolescent forem is for under 18

braceyourself
12-27-2012, 07:20 PM
I'm 20 and in college, and I agree with just about everything that has been said already.

Never in my life would I choose to go through this surgery because of the way I look. I always hated it when people said this to me, but in most cases, basically no one would even know you have scoliosis by looking at you. It was so obvious to me that I looked twisted. But we tend to be our own worst critics. That being said, my body really doesn't look any different than it did before surgery, except that I have perfect posture. : ) My right shoulder blade still sticks out and the right side of my chest still sinks in. Everyone is different, and who knows-- maybe you would have different results. I just want you to know that it may not cure everything.

On a side note, could you be getting too much sleep? It might sound crazy, but if I get more than a certain amount of sleep, I feel terrible and have a lot of neck pain.

Also, I had a lot of lower back pain before surgery. My curves were 52 and 57. And I have the same amount of lower back pain now. I hope I don't sound discouraging or that I'm complaining. This surgery has helped me in so many ways, and I'm very thankful for it! But these are some things, after having gone through it, that I would've liked to know before my surgery. So I hope it's helpful for you to consider.

Personally, I would strongly consider waiting until after college, if you have it done. But I have gone through 2 1/2 years of college since surgery, and I play volleyball, practice instruments for hours at a time, etc., and I completely enjoy all of it! Most of this, in my opinion, has so much to do with perspective. When we realize how much worse it could be, it suddenly doesn't seem so bad. We truly have so much to be thankful for. I hope you are able to make a decision that you are happy with, and that it proves to be the best decision for you!

Ok. I'm done with my book now. : )

jrnyc
12-27-2012, 08:53 PM
hi Marissa
welcome to the forum...a place no one wants to need, but a good
place to visit if one has scoliosis...
i just wanted to suggest that you might want to make use of
a counselor...a social worker or a psychologist...someone to talk
to on a regular basis...it can help a lot, to have someone to confide
in who is an objective party, but is also someone who is in your corner,
who wants to help...
colleges have counseling offices...if that doesn't feel private enough
for you, you could get a referral to a private counselor off campus...
if your parents have you insured, it may be covered under the insurance...
you might also want to consider, as Ev mentioned, an evaluation for
depression...it is a normal reaction to any kind of difficult circumstance,
including health issues....
as a licensed social worker myself, i think it might be helpful to you...
just a suggestion...

please know that lots of young women have body image issues, with and
without scoliosis involved...and we always look worse to ourselves than
we look to others...but that reasoning doesn't usually help someone going
thru the issues...just trying to tell you that you have company...

best regards...
jess...and Sparky, the wonder puppy

rohrer01
12-27-2012, 11:27 PM
Braceyourself (Katie),
Your video was very inpirational and you are a wonderful musician! Wow! Actually YOUR video is one that came up when I was researching scoliosis videos. I remember it because it was one of my favorites.

Now to Marissa,
Look at Katie's video. With her curves being larger than yours, can you really see the curves in the before pictures of her? I can't. She looks the same to me in the before and after pictures. We are really much harder on ourselves with body image. If I posted a picture of myself in clothing, you wouldn't be able to see mine either. It's the minute details of our bodies that only we ourselves notice. Another point to consider is the fact that not only are our spines curved, but our vertebrae are deformed to some extent AND our ribs are also deformed. Straightening the spine doesn't make rib deformities go away. It can help with appearance because we stand taller, but they have painful procedures that they do for people with severe rib deformity. So any weird dips or bumps in your ribs could remain after surgery as your ribs don't look bad enough to warrant the rib surgery.

Physical therapy and being very active as a young woman helped me the most with pain in my younger years. It hasn't been until I hit 40 that PT and exercise no longer work for pain management. You might consider seeing a pain specialist or physiatrist (specializing in muscle physiology/mechanics) for help with that. I hope you get some relief whatever you decide.

king14
12-28-2012, 12:00 AM
Hi marissa, welcome!!!
In my opinion I think you should wait. Especially if your looking for a physical transformation...I'd say to hold out. I honestly looked better before surgery... But I'm still hoping for improvement. I also had no pain before and have the "bear trap" pain as they describe... All which I would think would be such a distraction if i was in school. I also am having Major mood swings since the surgery. (I'm 29) and I feel like I'm all over the place, another thing that I think could be hard being in college....
But in the end the decision has to be 100% yours! I have my good days and bad days, days where I feel confident in the decision I made, and days where I feel like it was the worst decision ever... And I had a wonderful experience! Fantastic doctor, pretty much a painless recovery (up until a few weeks ago) and I would be an advocate for younger people to have surgery!!! But --- you're still so young that you'll still be considered "young" even if you have surgery 10 years from now... Feel free to email me with any questions or call me - I just had surgery 3 months ago.. So it's all very fresh!! Good luck!

Cornerthree
12-28-2012, 03:55 PM
Having Scoliosis fusion surgery is a life-altering thing, as metal rods are placed in your spine and it will never bend or move in the same way again. I had the surgery when I was 21 for a lot of the same reasons you state, but unfortunately, this is not an operation you want to do for cosmetic reasons. If you want to be honestly informed about it, please read the "surgery should be last resort" link I started.

Best wishes,

Irina
12-28-2012, 05:42 PM
Marissa,

A lot of people with good outcomes move on with their lives and don't post on any forum. If you draw your conclusion from reading online only, you may get a distorted picture. This forum is a great source of information, but please remember that it doesn't represent the whole population because a big share of happy patients with good outcomes is living their lives and we never hear from them.

This doesn't change the fact that scoliosis surgery should not be taken for cosmetic reasons only and you should be aware of all the risks. I agree that there is no long term data on success of this surgery, but I believe it is reasonable to expect that spinal fusion with instrumentation may need a revision later in life. Knee and hip replacement patients are told that they will need another surgery in 15-20 years (or whatever number it is). I don't think that the fact that there might be another surgery down the road should be a shock to spinal fusion patients.

Pooka1
12-28-2012, 05:45 PM
Marissa,

A lot of people with good outcomes move on with their lives and don't post on any forum. If you draw your conclusion from reading online only, you may get a distorted picture. This forum is a great source of information, but please remember that it doesn't represent the whole population because a big share of happy patients with good outcomes is living their lives and we never hear from them.

This doesn't change the fact that scoliosis surgery should not be taken for cosmetic reasons only and you should be aware of all the risks. I agree that there is no long term data on success of this surgery, but I believe it is reasonable to expect that spinal fusion with instrumentation may need a revision later in life. Knee and hip replacement patients are told that they will need another surgery in 15-20 years (or whatever number it is). I don't think that the fact that there might be another surgery down the road should be a shock to spinal fusion patients.

Those points are excellent.

By the way, no scoliosis fusion surgery is done for purely cosmetic reasons because insurance would never pay for cosmetic surgery and especially not extremely expensive cosmetic surgery.

tae_tap
12-28-2012, 07:30 PM
Marissa,

A lot of people with good outcomes move on with their lives and don't post on any forum. If you draw your conclusion from reading online only, you may get a distorted picture. This forum is a great source of information, but please remember that it doesn't represent the whole population because a big share of happy patients with good outcomes is living their lives and we never hear from them.

This doesn't change the fact that scoliosis surgery should not be taken for cosmetic reasons only and you should be aware of all the risks. I agree that there is no long term data on success of this surgery, but I believe it is reasonable to expect that spinal fusion with instrumentation may need a revision later in life. Knee and hip replacement patients are told that they will need another surgery in 15-20 years (or whatever number it is). I don't think that the fact that there might be another surgery down the road should be a shock to spinal fusion patients.



Well said Irina!

Tamena

golfnut
12-28-2012, 07:32 PM
I don't have anything to add to the good points that everyone else has made, but just wanted to welcome you to the forum.

turfxo
01-02-2013, 01:45 AM
Thank you to everyone that replied, sorry its taken me so long to go on but I was really busy with the holidays and whatnot.

I understand everyone's points, I have an appointment on the 7th to discuss surgery & you guys have helped me a lot with some of the questions I want to ask my surgeon. As for the depression thing, I've always been a heavy sleeper, so I'm not sure if that has anything to do with it. I also suffered from an eating disorder that started a few years after my bracing started. So i've always had body image issues. I just hate scoliosis and wish the surgery would make everything go away. Also, my neck pain has stopped completely! My mom bought me a memory foam pillow and it has helped so much. I spent the night at my friends last night and slept with a regular pillow, and I woke up with the same neck pain as before. So I definitely think the new pillow helped.


Anyways, thanks for everyone's feedback & I'll keep everyone posted on my decision.

Also, has anyone done the Schroth treatment that was mentioned? And I'm still kind of confused on overall flexibility, can you guys bend your back at all?

Pooka1
01-02-2013, 06:10 AM
Also, has anyone done the Schroth treatment that was mentioned?

Literally tens of thousands of people have tried Schroth. It was invented by a lay person in Germany over 90 years ago. Today in Germany, it is still a fringe treatment and surgeries go on as usual. There is no evidence Schroth has prevented a single fusion.

Now as PT, it probably is effective for some pain as opposed to stopping progression in adults. But any good PT would address pain, you don't need to pop the exorbitant amounts Schroth purveyors charge.

If anyone challenges any of these statements, ask them for evidence. Also ask for a money back guarantee.

Good luck.

JenniferG
01-02-2013, 01:50 PM
I just wanted to highlight what you said about neck pain because there are a few here with neck pain.

"My mom bought me a memory foam pillow and it has helped so much. I spent the night at my friends last night and slept with a regular pillow, and I woke up with the same neck pain as before. So I definitely think the new pillow helped."

If this is something that could so easily help others, it deserves to be reiterated!

Confusedmom
01-03-2013, 11:42 PM
Marissa,

You won't be able to bend the part of your back that is fused AT ALL. It becomes one solid bone like the bone in your leg. However, whether you will have flexibility in your back depends a lot on what levels will be fused. If you are fused T10-L2, for instance, you will probably still have a lot of flexibility. If you are fused T2-S1, you will have hardly any in your back, except your neck. I would guess that being young, you won't be fused to the sacrum, so you will retain a lot of flexibility. But you should absolutely ask your doctor about that. I have a teenage acquaintance who was able to do flips in the swimming pool the same summer she had surgery. I, on the other hand, can't bend to get clothes in and out of the washer. So, bottom line, it varies a lot, depending on how many and which levels are fused.

Best,
Evelyn

TAMZTOM
01-04-2013, 09:14 AM
Also, has anyone done the Schroth treatment that was mentioned? And I'm still kind of confused on overall flexibility, can you guys bend your back at all?

The balanced advice above from many people who have had surgery is excellent.

I have a young daughter who's been doing Schroth for 18 months. We don't only do Schroth, but it is an integral part. Several adults with whom I share what we do have are also experiencing success, especially with aspects of Schroth. What can be achieved quickly is relief from the muscular pain caused by imbalanced posture. For example, by working the asymmetrically contracted areas (top left, bottom right quadrants in a right thoracic, left lumbar pattern), the opposing diagonal muscles are relieved.

A caution: I agree with Sharon (Pooka) that the purveyors of a DIFFERENT METHOD, Nu Power Schroth, are unlikely in my opinion to reduce anything except your bank balance. I refer to the methods of KATERINA SCHROTH.

I looked at your x-ray. Pelvic adjustment, a la Katernina Schroth, can unload your lower curve, bring your lumbar spine towards the mid-line and begin to relieve those loaded muscles on the lower left. With your protruding right hip, your curves are being loaded because of your habitual posture. You might consider buying the Katernia Schroth book and teach yourself these basics. Certainly a lot less expensive than the 'clinics'.

As for stopping your curves progressing and achieving correction, that is achievable. It is not easy to commit and follow through on what can achieve improvement. Some of that is discussed here: http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?12755-Correcting-scoliosis-Exercise-brace-mentality

Regards
Tom

jrnyc
01-04-2013, 10:30 AM
Marissa, i hope you have a chance to consult with a few different doctors...
their medical advice is what i suggest you pay closest
attention to...
few can be objective when viewing themselves, and for younger women,
body issues seem more common...
no one else will view you as harshly as you do.
believe me, to others, you look fine...but knowing or even believing that
is often of no help to the individual judging themselves.

jess

Pooka1
01-04-2013, 10:54 AM
1414

Marissa! I just looked at your radiograph and see you have a thoracolumbar curve that ends at L3 based on the measurement.

Please ask the surgeon about where your fusion would end now versus if you wait. You are not technically in the surgical range so you might be denied surgery now even though waiting might mean eventually losing your entire lumbar.

Please ask if you spend time trying PT if you will lose the window on only going to L3 (if that is your present window).

If you get fused now only to L3, you may never need more surgery extending to your pelvis. L3 is sort of a critical level where if the fusion goes below there, you can be in a "countdown to pelvis" as Boachie stated it. That is, it might be a matter of as little as a few years that you need an extension because the last few discs tend to fail when fusions go to L4 and below.

Also ask if having anterior fusion would save a distal level... maybe your fusion might only extend to L2 in which case you would likely never be in countdown territory.

If your radiograph was for my daughter, I would be getting an answer to the waiting question and the anterior question yesterday and literally standing on people's desks to get surgery if there was any chance waiting would require a fusion below L3. If the time taken for trying PT puts you in danger of being in a countdown when getting fusion immediately would save you from that then you need to know that from the surgeon. Your curve goes to L3 and time does not seem to be on your side given that.

Good luck.

TAMZTOM
01-04-2013, 11:39 AM
Please ask if you spend time trying PT if you will lose the window on only going to L3 (if that is your present window).

These are important considerations, easily accommodated. Surgery, presumably, would take some time to arrange and be done (I do not know that you need or will ever need surgery). You could start specific corrective Katerina Schroth exercise (as opposed to vague and often damaging general PT) tomorrow. What's the waiting time for surgery these days in the USA? A year? Two? Rather than "watch and wait" while curves progress, watch and correct seems wise. Compared to "watch and wait", you've nothing to lose.

Pooka1
01-04-2013, 12:14 PM
What's the waiting time for surgery these days in the USA? A year? Two?

No.

ETA: Also, I would certainly hope people who are about to drop out of their window get earlier op dates than the few months it might usually be. I have no idea if Marissa is or is not about to drop out of a window. She needs to find that out very quickly in my opinion. Yesterday preferably.

TAMZTOM
01-04-2013, 03:33 PM
No.

ETA: Also, I would certainly hope people who are about to drop out of their window get earlier op dates than the few months it might usually be. I have no idea if Marissa is or is not about to drop out of a window. She needs to find that out very quickly in my opinion. Yesterday preferably.

Wow, that's quick! Agree on yesterday. At 43 degrees and with the pelvic misalignment suggesting decompensation (methinks, perhaps, maybe), those asymmetrically supporting muscles can fatigue rapidly leaving the body without much support at all...then progression. Even at a few months out, she could try what I suggested. If she has a large postural element to that main curve, as seems so, focused work for even a few months would lop that off. Again, nothing to lose.

Pooka1
01-04-2013, 03:53 PM
Wow, that's quick! Agree on yesterday. At 43 degrees and with the pelvic misalignment suggesting decompensation (methinks, perhaps, maybe), those asymmetrically supporting muscles can fatigue rapidly leaving the body without much support at all...then progression. Even at a few months out, she could try what I suggested. If she has a large postural element to that main curve, as seems so, focused work for even a few months would lop that off. Again, nothing to lose.

It's possible they will deny surgery because she is only at 43*. It would be a kick in the teeth if they then needed to go below L3. Dr. Hey often uses the phrase, "a stitch in time saves nine" in reference to people who would have benefited from earlier fusion. Marissa might try to get a consult from him.

TAMZTOM
01-04-2013, 04:14 PM
It's possible they will deny surgery because she is only at 43*. It would be a kick in the teeth if they then needed to go below L3. Dr. Hey often uses the phrase, "a stitch in time saves nine" in reference to people who would have benefited from earlier fusion. Marissa might try to get a consult from him.

I was thinking that too because of the relatively low degree. It certainly makes sense for Marissa to seek opinion and knowledge. And give correction a try while she's seeking that input. (I don't know this Dr Hey?)

Pooka1
01-04-2013, 04:22 PM
Here is one o f Dr. Hey's blog posts where he uses the phrase...

http://drlloydhey.blogspot.com/2007/09/29-yo-woman-with-progressive-scoliosis.html

This woman was screwed because there is not a single surgeon who would have operated on the T30*.

TAMZTOM
01-04-2013, 04:44 PM
Here is one o f Dr. Hey's blog posts where he uses the phrase...

http://drlloydhey.blogspot.com/2007/09/29-yo-woman-with-progressive-scoliosis.html

This woman was screwed because there is not a single surgeon who would have operated on the T30*.

Skimmed it quickly, Sharon. Thanks. Listen to this. The first few explanatory paragraphs about curve progression are like reading KATERINA SCHROTH! No joke! The guy's explanation of curve progression is so similar. This is why I've said before that I've learned reams about non-invasive treatment by reading surgical papers and articles. As you know, I'm not an advocate of surgery, but that doesn't stop me learning from that field. I agree with the guy on the paragraphs I read. Th e only difference would be that he would operate, I would do what we do to correct. Both looking to achieve the same goal, stop this inevitable progression for curves of this degree.

For Marissa, the issue would be, 'Can focused, specific non-invasive treatment get this goddamn curve down below the progression threshold quickly enough to avoid surgery?'

jrnyc
01-04-2013, 05:56 PM
hi Marissa
please do not let any discussion of need for immediate decision
frighten you...
this is all what you would be best off discussing with your surgeon...
or any surgeon you might want to get another opinion from...
there is a list of top scoli surgeons all across the country,
on this scoliosis website...under "resources"

jess...& Sparky

Pooka1
01-04-2013, 06:31 PM
hi Marissa
please do not let any discussion of need for immediate decision
frighten you...
this is all what you would be best off discussing with your surgeon...
or any surgeon you might want to get another opinion from...
there is a list of top scoli surgeons all across the country,
on this scoliosis website...under "resources"

jess...& Sparky

I agree! This is just to suggest some questions that relate to length of fusion to ask her surgeon. I am very sure I made that clear. Nobody here is a surgeon so we can't know the answers to these questions.

Marissa is not technically surgical in terms of hitting the trigger angle of 50*. So there is no rush from that stand point. But as Dr. Hey's blogs point out over and over again, there are other considerations like length of fusion and where it ends and what that means. There are some things known about this and the surgeon can tell you what they are if you know to ask.

king14
01-04-2013, 06:45 PM
I just want to reiterate that although I'm not happy with my physical appearance my flexibility is great! (T4-L1)
I wish I had surgery sooner so that my compensating curve didn't get so large. And maybe my muscles and soft tissue wouldn't be so imbalanced.
I also did PT- and although it greatly reduced my pain - it did not stop my curves from progressing.
Just my experience. Good luck!!

TAMZTOM
01-04-2013, 07:08 PM
I also did PT- and although it greatly reduced my pain - it did not stop my curves from progressing. Just my experience. Good luck!!

Apologies if you've posted this elsewhere: what type of exercise did you do? Might help the poster to decide what not to try.

king14
01-04-2013, 11:05 PM
Hi, I've done numerous types of PT. one lung breathing, stretching short side, strengthening weak side. Aqua therapy, soft tissue manipulation, electric Stim.... The list goes on... I haven't followed Schroth which is what I believe you do... But It has peaked my interest, especially now - willing to try anything that may improve the imbalances in my appearance and my post surgical lean... I wouldn't rule out PT- I was just giving my experience with it.

TAMZTOM
01-05-2013, 05:54 AM
Hi, I've done numerous types of PT. one lung breathing, stretching short side, strengthening weak side. Aqua therapy, soft tissue manipulation, electric Stim.... The list goes on... I haven't followed Schroth which is what I believe you do... But It has peaked my interest, especially now - willing to try anything that may improve the imbalances in my appearance and my post surgical lean... I wouldn't rule out PT- I was just giving my experience with it.

H King

My post above was TOO short, seemed abrupt. It wasn't intended so. That's a problem with online discussion, easy to accidentally convey the wrong impression. I should have said something like "I'm really intrigued as to what you did."

In addition to much other stuff, yes, we do a lot of KATERINA Schroth type training (not to be confused with the "NU POWER SCHROTH" currently proliferating in the USA).

Regards
Tom